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ACADEMIC CALENDAR - 1977-1978 








FALLTERM 




September 


3 


Saturday 


Orientation Begins 




September 


7 


Wednesday 


Courses Begin — 8 a.m. 




September 


10 


Saturday 


Class Day 




November 


14 


Monday 


Courses End — 5 p.m. 




November 


15 


Tuesday 


Reading Day 




November 


16 


Wednesday 


Exams Begin — 9 a.m. 




November 


19 


Saturday 


Exams End — 5 p.m. 
8 Days Recess 








WINTER TERM 




November 


28 


Monday 


Courses Begin — 8 a.m. 




December 


16 


Friday 


Christmas Holidays Begin 
23 Days Recess 


- 5 p.m 


January 


9 


Monday 


Christmas Holidays End - 


8 a.m. 


February 


24 


Friday 


Courses End — 5 p.m. 




February 


25 


Saturday 


Reading Day 




February 


27 


Monday 


Exams Begin - 9 a.m. 




March 


2 


Thursday 


Exams End — 5 p.m. 
1 1 Days Recess 








SPRING TERM 




March 


13 


Monday 


Courses Begin — 8 a.m. 




March 


18 


Saturday 


Class Day 




May 


18 


Thursday 


Courses End - 5 p.m. 




May 


19 


Friday 


Reading Day 




May 


20 


Saturday 


Exams Begin — 9 a.m. 




May 


24 


Wednesday 


Exams End — 5 p.m. 




May 


28 


Sunday 


Commencement 





CORRESPONDENCE DIRECTORY 



General Administrative 

Admissions 

Development, Communications, 

Alumni Relations 
Educational Program 
Employment of Seniors 
Finance 
Scholarships 
Student Housing 
Student Interests and Counseling 
Summer School 
Transcripts and Academic Reports 



Office of the President 
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Vice President for Development 

Vice President for A cademic A f fairs 

Director of Experiential Programs 

Comptroller 

Office of Admissions and Financial Aid 

Director of Student Housing 

Dean of Students 

Registrar 

Registrar 



VISITORS ARE WELCOME at Davidson. Visitors desiring interviews or tours are urged to make 
appointments in advance. Write or phone 704/892-8021 through )uly 15, 1977; 704/892-2000 
July 16, 1977 and thereafter. 




Davidson College 



1977-78 •' 



Davidson College is fully accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools. It is a member of the Association of American Colleges, the 
Southern University Conference, the National Conference of Church-Related 
Colleges, and the Presbyterian Educational Association of the South. The 
Davidson chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was one of the first in North Carolina. 



Davidson College admits qualified students of any race, color, national and 
ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally 
accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate 
on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration 
of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, 
and athletic and other school-administered programs. 

Davidson College offers equal opportunity in its employment and educational 
activities, in compliance with Title IX and other civil rights laws. 



Davidson College reserves the right to make changes in policies, regulations, 
and fees as printed herein. 



A private college since 1837, Davidson's continuing service to young people 
is dependent on gifts and bequests from private citizens who believe in its 
mission. 

For information on how to plan gifts to fit one's own estate situation and 
obtain maximum tax benefits, call or write the Office of Special Resources, 
Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. 28036 (704/892-8021 through July 15, 
1977:704/892-2000 July 16, 1977, and thereafter). 

BEQUEST FORM 

To the Trustees of Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina, 

I give and bequeath the sum of dollars, for the use 

and benefit of such College in such manner as its Board of Trust- 
ees shall determine. 



INTRODUCTION 

THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



Introduction 


7 


The Center for Special Studies 


9 


Departmental Honors 


10 


Extended Studies 


n 


Accelerated Programs 


11 


Summer Study 


12 


Pre-Professional Preparation 


12 


The Library 


16 


The Computer 


17 


Self-Instructional Language Program 


17 


Off-Campus Programs 


18 


Requirements for Graduation 


23 


CAMPUS LIFE 


26 


Student Government 


27 


The Honor System and the Code of Responsibility 


27 


Involuntary Withdrawal 


28 


Campus Living 


28 


Social Life 


29 


Other Opportunities 


30 


HISTORY AND STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 


35 


ADMISSION AND FINANCE 


40 


Admission 


41 


Financial Aid " 


44 


Finance 


47 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 50 

OFFICIAL RECORD, 1976-77 116 

Faculty 117 

Administrative Staff 123 

Trustees 128 

Scholarships 129 

Awards 133 

Honoraries 136 

Scholarship Holders 137 

Class of 1976 140 

Student Body, geographical and by class 144 

Student Body, by zip code 145 

Student Body, cross-listed alphabetically 166 

Junior Year Abroad 170 

Alumni Association Chapter Presidents 171 

INDEX 174 

MAP 176 




Davidson College believes in the student. It exists not only to create and 
communicate knowledge, but to help students find and develop that which 
is best in each of them. Davidson expects students to change during four 
years of study — to become prepared for able careers, yes, but also to 
develop the self-awareness and selfless understanding that lead to lives of 
person fulfillment and service to humanity. 

Davidson is a college of the liberal arts, because it believes in the whole per- 
son whose profession is life-fulfilling. Creativity must be balanced by disci- 
pline, leadership by service, work by play, freedom by responsibility. 

The majority of Davidson graduates go to graduate or professional schools, 
and Davidson believes they will be better doctors or lawyers, or businessmen 
or ministers or teachers if they are first of all mature human beings. David- 
son avoids graduating "packaged products." Instead it concentrates on a pro- 
gram that is demanding, exciting, and flexible. The emphasis at Davidson is 
on the individual student. Only by being challenged can one find one's po- 
tential; only by exploring with guidance can one develop it to the fullest. 

Davidson is a small college — a friendly college — and the individual student 
finds friends among professors as well as other students. Classes are small; 




relationships are informal. Small group discussions are an essential part of 
the Davidson experience, and the emphasis is often on basic values and how 
they may be applied to life situations. There is ample opportunity to pursue 
the questions everyone has to answer, "Who am I?" and "Where am I going?" 
Davidson is a close-knit college, with an honor tradition that works and a 
spirit that breeds loyalty. 

Davidson is a college with a Christian commitment, because it believes that 
faith as well as learning makes the whole person. Davidson insists on a fear- 
less, penetrating search for truth in all realms of knowledge, denying no one 
the right of inquiry while guaranteeing a forthright hearing for the Christian 
faith. Faith can be an act of personal growth, and Davidson provides broad 
opportunities for growth through worship, study, and service. The college 
was founded by Presbyterians and retains strong ties to the Presbyterian 
Church. 



Davidson believes that college is an act of living, an act of learning, an act of 
giving. It seeks to provide an experience that is both rigorous and humaniz- 
ing, that helps the individual develop as a person — a whole person — with 
the resources for self-fulfillment and service to mankind. 







liiii 




EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 



Davidson's educational program is designed to help students 
develop the art of thinking. It offers a v^ide variety of experiences 
v\/ithin a broad range of subjects. 

The student is introduced to a curriculum divided into four general 
areas of study: 

I. Language, Literature, and the Fine Arts 
II. Philosophy and Religion 

III. Natural Science and Mathematics 

IV. Social Science 

Students choose at least three courses from each area, thus 
becoming acquainted with these four approaches by which hu- 
manity has sought understanding. 

To encourage the excitement and self-discipline that come from 
probing a subject in depth, the college requires a major in one of the 
following: 



Art French Political Science 

Biology German Premedical 

Chemistry History Psychology 

Classics Mathematics Religion 

Economics Music Sociology 

English Philosophy Spanish 
Physics 

The college also offers courses, but no major, in Drama and 
Speech, Education, Humanities, Military Science, Physical Education, 
and South Asian Studies. 

Within the framework of area distribution and the major, the 
student may pursue a wide variety of options, including independent 
study, community involvement, study of other cultures, and 
interdisciplinary study. 



Students may pursue independent study in a variety of ways. More 
details are given in the following descriptions of specific programs, 
but in general the independent study options offer the chance to 
work within the major on projects of special interest, to work on 
topics of special interest outside the range of the major and the 
regular curriculum, and, for the exceptional student, to design a 
personal course of study. 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 



COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 



STUDY ABROAD 



Recognizing that the classroom is only a part of life, Davidson 
encourages community involvement. Many students take Extended 
Studies or department projects in the town of Davidson, in the 
nearby city of Charlotte, or other area communities. Programs vary 
from assisting at hospitals to studying a police department to working 
with disadvantaged children. Some students have studied and 
worked in prison reform, others with mentally retarded children. 
Programs of this kind enable students to see others as individual 
human beings with specific and unique needs, as well as helping 
them understand the processes of applying and acquiring 
knowledge. 



A significant part of a liberal education is the study of other cultures, 
and Davidson encourages this both at the college and by study 
abroad. A wide range of opportunities prepares the student both 
culturally and linguistically for study in France, Germany, England, 
the lands of the Classics, and Spain. These programs enable students 
to experience cultures which have values, attitudes, and mores 
different from their own and thus acquire a better understanding of 
and feeling for their own culture as well as others. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY 



Davidson affirms strongly the value of interdiscipinar^ study 
undertaken in a responsible fashion. A highly respected program at 
the college is the two-year interdisciplinary Humanities sequence, a 
six term course in thedevelopmentof Western civilization, taughtby 
fifteen different faculty members in two teams, one for the freshman 
year and one for the sophomore year. The Humanities course now 
enrolls 120 freshmen, who must complete both years of the program 
to receive credit for it. The special value of the Humanities course is 
that it permits students to learn early in their college careers ways in 
which the integration of several disciplines such as literature, history, 
philosophy, and religion can afford insights not usually available in a 
purely departmental framework. The interdisciplinary method helps 
to remind the student of the unity of all knowledge. 

While the Humanities program is the largest interdisciplinary 
course at the college, there are other cross-disciplinary courses such 
as American Literature and Religion, Philosophy of Religion, The 
Physics of Music, and Physiological Psychology which challenge the 
student to approach traditional subjects from a new perspective. 

Davidson, then, is a small, liberal arts college which utilizes the 
area distribution requirement, the major, and additional oppor- 
tunities as the basis of its academic program. It is Davidson's hope 
that the academic program is both rigorous and humanizing, that a 
Davidson education is an experience that helps men and women 



develop as persons, but that it also is one that supplies its graduates 
with the skills necessary to pursue advanced work at graduate 
institutions of the highest quality. Because Davidson has a faculty of 
men and v^omen devoted to teaching, because it has a student body 
of highly capable young men and women, because its historic 
commitment to the Christian faith has produced graduates who 
believe in service to others, and because Davidson is concerned 
enough to insure that each person is treated as an individual, 
Davidson believes its hopes can be realized. 



THE CENTER FOR SPECIAL STUDIES 



The Center for Special Studies provides an alternative academic 
framework for the self-motivated student and the student interest- 
ed in interdisciplinary studies. Applicants may be admitted to the 
center either as participants in Special Programs or as participants 
in Interdisciplinary Studies. Both groups of students pursue a 
combination of regular courses, independent study courses, and 
tutorials and seminars offered in the Center; and they share and 
participate in the lectures, symposia and other events in the 
Center. 

Enrollment in the Center is voluntary and can begin v^^ith any 
term; however admission is determined by the Faculty of the Cen- 
ter. Standard registration and grading procedures are followed. All 
students, whether in Special Programs or in Interdisciplinary Stud- 
ies, work with an adviser from the Center Faculty and, at the end 
of each term, have their work evaluated by the entire Faculty of 
the Center. The satisfaction of all graduation requirements and the 
writing of a senior thesis is expected, although specific require- 
ments may at times be waived. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS -The Special Programs option provides 
an educational opportunity for the self-motivated student who 
wishes to design an individualized program of study. Students in 
Special Programs pursue advanced work of a disciplinary nature 
or programs of interdisciplinary study not embraced by the three 
more structured programs described below. Within their individ- 
ualized programs, students may progress as fast and as imaginative- 
ly as their abilities and maturity permit. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES - The Center for Special 
Studies offers interdisciplinary programs in American Studies, 
Public Policy, and Dramatic Literature and Theatre. Although 
more structured than the personally designed Special Programs, 
these interdisciplinary "majors" offer students an opportunity 



to integrate the knowledge and resources of two or more aca- 
demic fields in an organized and intensive manner. Interdis- 
ciplinary studies do not follow traditional departmental lines but 
draw from the traditional disciplines whatever materials seem to 
promote understandingof the specific, multidisciplinary emphasis. 



American Studies. By utilizing material from a wide variety of disciplines (including 
American history, literature, religion, and art), the American Studies program provides 
an innovative approach to the study of American culture and thought. It offers students 
an opportunity to acquire a broad understanding of the American experience, to think 
systematically about the nature of cultural analysis, and to analyze in depth a salient 
theme in American life. During 1977-78, the program will focus upon the theme of 
"rural, small town, and city life in America." 

Public Policy. In light of the increasing influence and complexities of local, state and 
national governments, the Center offers an undergraduate "major" in Public Policy. The 
study of public policy focuses on decision making in the public sector and is therefore 
social scientific in its approach. It consists of regular courses. Center seminars, field ex- 
perience and the senior thesis. To complement the emphasis on public solutions to 
social problems, the Center plans to initiate an interdisciplinary research project con- 
cerning the response of small towns to the prospect of urban growth. Entitled, "On the 
City's Rim," the project will afford students an opportunity to apply the tools of public 
analysis. 

Dramatic Literature and Ttieatre. The Interdisciplinary Program in Dramatic Liter- 
ature and Theatre is designed especially for juniors and seniors who are interested in re- 
lating literature and theatre or are preparing for careers in communication-related fields. 
The dual emphasis on dramatic literature and theatre arts will permit the student to ex- 
plore plays of classical, European, British, American and Oriental origin in conjunction 
with a history of theatre and independent study in the student's area of special concern. 

Because interdisciplinary courses provide participating students 
the opportunity for a shared educational experience, alKtudents 
in the Center, including those in Special Programs, must take at 
least one course each year in one of the Interdisciplinary Programs. 



DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

A program of departmental honors is available in most departments 
that offer a major. Students of exceptional ability may substitute 
special work on an individual basisfor a portionof the normalcourse 
requirements during the junior and senior years. Successful 
completion of the program entitles students to be graduated with 
"Honors" or "High Honors" in the department of their major. 

Students with an average of 3.0 for all work prior to their junior 
year may apply to the appropriate department chairman for 
permission to become candidates for honors, specifying in detail the 
work they wish to pursue. Applications should be made in the spring 
of the sophomore year when courses for the following year are 
selected. Approval of applications is contingent upon maintenance 
10 of a 3.0 average through the term. 



EXTENDED STUDIES 



Seniors applying for honors must be recommended by the 
professors in their major department. The senior applicant must have 
completed all work of the first three years with a 3.5 average and 
maintain an average of 3.0 in non-honors classes during the senior 
year. 

Extended Studies 1 and 2 is a unique feature of the Davidson College 
curriculum which allows freshmen and sophomores to tailor an 
academic undertaking according to their own interests and needs. 
The primary purpose is to enable students to broaden their 
knowledge and experience outside the field of their prospective 
major. There is faculty supervision, but within broad limits students 
may pursue a variety of ideas and receive academic credit for doing 
so, greatly increasing the flexibility of the curriculum. 

The freshman-sophomore Extended Studies program has two 
broad options, academic projects and interdisciplinary seminars. The 
seminars require the integration of information and ideas from many 
fields, for example, "Penology and Criminal justice in North 
Carolina" and "Poverty and the Legal Process: Do the Poor Really Pay 
More?" 

For an academic project, students may pursue projects of their 
own design, working with a faculty sponsor. Recent projects include 
"Dissent in the Soviet Union, Emphasizing Solzhenitsyn," "Peer 
Group Influences, Values, and Pressures in a Home for Children," 
"Black Voting Behavior and the Black Experience in America," "The 
Retail Drug Industry in North Carolina," and "The Psychology of 
Caring for Terminal Patients" (done in conjunction with hospital 
work). One student researched and built a Revolutionary era rifle. 

Extended Studies 3 and 4 allows juniors and seniors to do 
significant advanced work in their majors on an independent and 
individual basis. The departments vary in their requirements for 
these programs, and details may be found under "Major Re- 
quirements" for the appropriate departments. 

Extended Studies 1 and 2 are elective courses which freshmen and 
sophomores may choose instead of another course. They do not 
fulfill distribution requirements. Extended Studies 3 and 4 are 
required; each junior and each senior must complete one extended 
studies course as a requirement for graduation. Details are provided 
in the manual on Extended Studies. 

ACCELERATED PROGRAMS 

By taking extra courses a student might graduate early, make up a 

deficiency, or gain enrichment. Students with a grade point average 

of not less than 3.0 for each of the two preceding terms, or those 

without a two-term record upon the recommendation of the adviser, 

and freshmen who are recommended by an adviser, are eligible to 

apply. Those enrolled take four rather than three courses per term. 

This program is limited to five percent of the enrollment of each n 

class. 



SUMMER STUDY 



Four opportunities for study programs are offered by the college 
during the normal summer vacation period. Detailed information 
about them becomes available each winter. In brief, they are: 

1. Independent Study and Extended Studies. Students may 
arrange individual courses with specific professors on a contract 
basis. Contracts are available in the Registrar's Office. Independent 
Study course contracts require the approval of the Vice Presidentfor 
Academic Affairs, and those in Extended Studies the approval of the 
Director of Extended Studies. Registration (a completed and 
executed contract) should be completed usually before the 15th of 
July. 

2. Special Workshops and Conferences. For the past six summers, 
in cooperation with Broughton Hospital, Davidson has offered a two- 
course program which combines Psychology 131 (Abnormal 
Psychology) and Psychology 231 (Advanced Abnormal Psychology). 
This program is open to a limited number of students. 

3. Davidson in England. A select group of students from the Eight- 
College Consortium may study for six weeks in the summer at St. 
Anne's College, Oxford University, in Oxford, England. See details 
under "Study Abroad." 

4. Study as a transient or visiting student at another accredited 
college while maintaining matriculation at Davidson. Advance 
consultation with the Registrar is advised. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION 



Approximately 70 percent of Davidson's graduates continue their 
education at graduate or professional schools. The sound liberal arts 
education which Davidson offers serves as excellent preparation for 
further study or for entering a career directly following graduation. 
Students with definite plans for graduate or professional school are 
urged to familiarize themselves with graduate school admission 
requirements and to consult with their advisers early about the most 
advantageous program to pursue. In general, graduate school 
standards are high. Applicants are expected to have done un- 
dergraduate work of good quality, to have a reading knowledge of at 
least one foreign language, and to make acceptable scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination. 



PREMEDICAL 



Davidson offers a premedical major, but students planning to attend 
medical school may major in another discipline and also fulfill 
requirements for medical school admission. An active Premedical 
Committee works closely with premedical and pre-dental students 
to guide them in their work at Davidson and to help them attain 
12 admission to a medical school suitable to their interests and talents. 



PRE-LAW 



Law schools require no specific courses as preparation, but the Pre- 
law Committee wori<s with interested students to guide them in the 
type of preparation deemed most helpful. The Law School Admission 
Test may be taken at Davidson during the senior year. 



An active Pre-Ministerial Committee holds seminars on aspects of 
the contemporary ministry and brings to campus representatives of 
the various graduate schools for theological education. Among 
Davidson's living alumni, there are over 900 ministers, testifying to 
the college's continuing work in preparing students for advanced 
study in theological seminaries or graduate schools of religion. 



PRE-MINISTERIAL 



TEACHER EDUCATION 



The Davidson curriculum offers good preparation for professional 
work or graduate study in education. No work in elementary ed- 
ucation is provided at Davidson, but the student wishing to obtain 
the A-certificate for secondary school teaching may do so in 
English, Mathematics, Foreign Language (French, German, Latin, 
Spanish), Natural Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Social 
Science, Economics, History, Political Science, or Sociology. To 
obtain the A-certificate, students must complete eight courses in 
education and psychology in addition to subject matter require- 
ments (Education 121, 142, 152,212-214,216; Psychology 101; 
either Education 141 or Psychology 102). The North Carolina A- 
certificate is currently accepted in 30 other states. More complete 
information is available from the Director of Teacher Education 
or the Chairman of the Department of Education. 



MUSIC 



Davidson's Music Department offers thorough musical training and a 
variety of opportunities for participation — the Women's Chorus, the 
Male Chorus, the Madrigal Singers, the Wind Ensemble, Woodwind 
or Brass Ensembles, and a Wildcat Pep Band. The department 
maintains an excellent library of music and records and has modern 
recording and reproduction equipment. There are two excellent 
pipe organs for use by students. The College Church organ, designed 
by the college organist in the style of Gottfried Silbermann of the late 
Baroque period, has 3576 pipes in 67 ranks and is played from a three- 
manual and pedal console. 1 3 



ENGINEERING 

Believing that the liberal arts college has a contribution to make 
toward the education of engineers in a society faced with 
increasingly complex technological and humanistic problems, 
Davidson has entered into cooperative engineering programs with 
Columbia University in New York, Georgia Institute of Technology in 
Atlanta, North Carolina State University at Raleigh, and Washington 
University in St. Louis. They offer an opportunity for five years of 
study leading to bachelor's degrees from both Davidson and the 
engineering school. The student attends Davidson for three years 
and the engineering school for the last two years. In some cases 
summer work is necessary. The program guarantees acceptance into 
one of the engineering schools provided the student's average is 3.0 
for the courses required by the engineering school and his conduct 
at Davidson is of high quality. To receive a Davidson degree under 
the cooperative 3-2 plan a student must: 

1. Complete TI courses that will satisfy the regular distribution 
requirements for graduation, with at least a C average 

2. Demonstrate the regularly required proficiency in foreign 
language, composition, and physical education 

3. Graduate from one of the cooperating schools in an approved 
engineering curriculum. 

Since many of the required courses must be taken in proper 
sequence, it is essential for a prospective 3-2 student to get started on 
the program during his first term at Davidson. For further 
information and assistance, contact the faculty engineering adviser. 

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Davidson is vitally interested in contributing to business leadership 
persons with a rich liberal arts background. Many Davidson 
graduates enter the business world directly, and many others go on 
to graduate school in business administration or management. A 
major in economics is especially appropriate for those planning to 
enter business. 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

The Reserve Officers Training Corps at Davidson leads to a com- 
mission upon graduation as a Second Lieutenant, United States 
Army Reserve. The program provides ROTC graduates with a 
choice of all Army Branches; however, the Medical and Judge 
Advocate General (Law) require completion of medical school or 
law school and the Chaplain Corps requires active duty service in 
addition to seminary. 

Women are encouraged to enroll in ROTC and to participate in 
the Army ROTC Scholarship program (see details under Financial 
14 Aid). 



The Military Science Program consists of a two-year Basic 
Course and a two-year Advanced Course. The Basic Course is tal<en 
during the freshman and sophomore years and covers management 
principles; military history; leadership development; and military 
courtesy, discipline and customs. The Basic Course imposes no 
obligation; students may withdraw without penalty during normal 
drop-add periods. The Basic Course may be waived for those who 
have had Junior ROTC or active duty experience. 

The Advanced Course is limited to cadets who have demonstrat- 
ed potential for becoming Army officers and meet Army physical 
standards. It provides instruction in advanced leadership develop- 
ment, organization and management, tactics and administration, 
and pays a cadet $100 a month each month he or she is in school, 
for up to 20 months. Advanced course cadets must attend a five- 
week advanced camp between their junior and senior years of col- 
lege. Cadets receive pay during camp, plus travel expenses, room 
and board, medical and dental care and other benefits. 




THE LIBRARY 




16 



The E. H. Little Library opened in September 1974. The well- 
appointed building, 100,000 square feet and completely air con- 
ditioned, took five years to plan and two years to build. 

Research materials are housed on three floors, and all of the 
225,000 volumes and 1,500 periodicals are on open stacks, available 
for students to select for themselves. About half the student body can 
be seated in the library at one time, and a 24-hour Study Room is 
provided for those wanting study space during times other than the 
105 hours per week the library is open. 

The microform collection has more than 10,000 reels of microfilm, 
including complete runs of The Times of London from 1785, The New 
York Times from 1851, The New York Tribune from 1841-1924, The 
Atlanta Constitution from 1868, The Charlotte News from 1888 and 
The Charlotte Observer from 1892. Its 35,000 microcards include all 
of Evans' Bibliography of Books Printed in America from 1639-1800. 

The Davidsoniana Room contains works by and about alumni, 
faculty, and staff members of the college. Of particular interest are 
collections dealing with Woodrow Wilson and Peter Stuart Ney. The 



THE COMPUTER 



Rare Book Room houses a first edition of the world's first great 
encyclopedia, several incunabula, special and numbered editions, as 
well as many objects d'art. 

Reference assistance is available during most hours when the 
library is open from any of the seven professional librarians. One 
librarian serves as Reference Coordinator for Independent Study, 
giving particular attention to assisting students and faculty in their 
independent study and research projects. 

Davidson students have access to two computer systems. Assistance 
is provided for students to learn to test and run their own programs 
on either system. 

One computer is the NCR Century 101, installed in 1974. It features 
four on-line discs with a total capacity of over 20 million characters. 
Its high-speed line printer can produce 1200 lines of information per 
minute. Its internal memory unit has more than 32,000 storage 
positions and its memory speed is about 1.2 microseconds. This 
computer uses four languages: COBOL, FORTRAN IV, RPG, and 
NEAT/3 (NCR's general purpose language). 

The second computer, a PDP/8f built by Digital Equipment 
Corporation, was installed in 1975. It has 24,000 memory positions, 
one disc unit, and eight terminals located in four campus buildings. 
The programming language on this system is BASIC. 

SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL LANGUAGE PROGRAM 
(excepting French, German, and Spanish) 

Dependent upon the availability of tutors, three-term sequences of 
independent study in non-western languages are offered to students 
of high motivation and demonstrable language-learning aptitude. 
Emphasis is placed on the spoken language, though reading skills 
are also developed. Auditing is not permitted. Completion of Level 
20 meets the foreign language requirement. Consult the director for 
application materials and a list of languages now being offered. 
1 Intensive Basic (Japanese, Swahili, etc.) 
An intensive audio-lingual course utilizing self-instructional 
texts and tapes combined with three one-hour tutorial 
sessions/week with a native speaker and a final examination by a 
specialist who will usually be invited from another institution. 
The outside examination is the basis for the term grade. 
10 Continuing Elementary (Japanese, Swahili, etc.) 

A continuation of the audio-lingual study of the language aimed 
at the further development of oral-aural skills and reading 
ability. Method as for Level 1. 
20 Intermediate (Japanese, Swahili, etc.) 

Extensive oral-aural drill and reading in texts of moderate 
difficulty. Emphasis on speaking fluency, oral composition and 
vocabulary building. Method as for Level 1. ^7 



OFF-CAMPUS PROGRAMS 

EXPERIENTIAL PROGRAMS AND LIFE/WORK PLANNING 



The Office for Experiential Programs and Life/Work Planning 
provides information, planning workshops, counseling and other 
support for: 

— those students who wish to develop a plan for their life and their 
work. 

— those students who wish to participate in carefully selected field 
experiences. 

— those students who wish to develop alternative options 
following graduation. 

The entire program is flexible, and students may take advantage of 
it in many ways. Individual counseling and workshops help in 
developing self-understanding and a sense of direction. A resource 
center provides information on hundreds of opportunities for off- 
campus participation in service projects, business, industry, pre- 
professional internships, and travel. The staff assists the students in 
developing the experiential program they need, keeps in touch with 
them during the experience, and helps them evaluate it afterwards. 

Field experiences have varied widely, with some students working 
with African villagers and others serving internships in business firms. 
The Extern Program during spring break each year places students 
with selected alumni for a one-week career testing experience. 

Although academic credit is not given for the experience itself, 
students may make arrangements with a professor to earn credit 
upon successful completion of an independent study or Extended 
Studies project connected with it. A student's time off-campus may 
range from several afternoons weekly to a full year. Students benefit 
from the experience itself and also from the preparation it gives them 
for future interviews with graduate school or employer represent- 
atives. 

Interested students are urged to contact the Office for Experiential 
Programs and Life/Work Planning early to allow time for necessary 
planning and preparation. 



CHARLOTTE AREA EDUCATIONAL CONSORTIUM 



The CAEC is a loosely structured organization of the eleven 
institutions of higher education within approximately twenty-five 
miles of Charlotte. Those colleges and universities have agreed to 
work together to foster the highest possible level of college and 
university education in the Charlotte area, and to encourage the 
development of mutually beneficial relationships between the 
consortium institutions. 

Students in the member institutions may cross-enroll to take 
advantage of courses not offered by home institutions; for inter- 
library use of books, journals, reference works, and related 
resources; and for planning inter-institutional student programs. 



STUDY ABROAD 



The consortium also offers assistance for arranging meetingsof the 
faculties of the academic disciplines and of the administrative areas 
of the institutions. Limited funding and other assistance is given in 
the development of workshops and conferences for various interest 
groups in the member institutions. For example, the English 
departments of the CAEC schools have sponsored an annual Writers 
and Readers Conference. 

Those wishing more information should contact the Davidson 
representative of the CAEC. 



Study abroad is an important element in a liberal education, and 
there are many opportunities for foreign study open to Davidson 
students. In the case of the junior year abroad, the cost, including 
tuition, room, board, and most travel expenses, is approximately the 
same as that of a similar period at Davidson. Students receiving 
financial aid may apply it to the cost of the year abroad. 

Qualified students in all disciplines are encouraged to participate. 
A resident adviser, usually a member of the Davidson faculty, serves 
as director of the program at its overseas location and, in most cases, 
teaches and supervises academic work. All programs allow time for 
program-related and independent travel. 

Davidson-sponsored programs are: 

1. An academic year abroad (usually the junior year) with full 
credit in either Marburg (Germany) or Montpellier (France). 

2. One-term programs (usually in the spring): Classics Seminar, 
Spain or Latin America, and Art FHistory in France. 

3. A summer session at St. 'Anne's College, in Oxford, sponsored 
jointly with Mary Baldwin College. 

Students may also join academic programs sponsored and 
administered by other accredited American colleges or universities, 
or make arrangements with the major department and the 
Committee on International Education for independent study 
abroad. 



DA VIDSON IN FRANCE 

Davidson students may study as fully matriculated students at the 
University of Montpellier, one of the oldest and most eminent 
universities of Europe, dating from 1221. Some of its most 
distinguished alumni include Petrarch, Rabelais, Paul Valery and 
Auguste Comte. The university includes five faculties, eight 
institutes, and an internationally known botanical garden. Course 
work is available in all disciplines of the humanities and sciences, 
and, in fact, more than half the participants are other than lan- 
guage majors. Although Montpellier is a thriving commerical cen- 
ter, there is little heavy industry and the life of the university 19 



dominates the community. Of the city's 1 65,000 inhabitants over 
one-seventh are students and faculty. Ideally situated in the old 
province of Languedoc, of which it was the capital, Montpellier 
looks toward both the sea and the mountains, with a beautiful 
beach and resort just to the south, and the Cevennes Mountains a 
few miles to the north. Within an hour's drive are many mon- 
umental remains of the Roman epoch in cities such as Nimes, 
Aries and Avignon. The Pyrenees Mountains and Spanish border 
are only about two and one half hours away to the southwest. 



SEiVilNA R IN ART HIS TOR Y IN FRA NCE 



A three-course credit art history program is planned for alternate 
years in the Spring Term. It will be open to sophomores, or 
juniors regardless of major, and in exceptional cases, to seniors. Non- 
art majors may apply one course credit toward their major providing 
they have received advanced approval from their advisers. The first 
two weeks will be spent at Davidson researching topics which will be 
presented by the participating students to the other members of the 
seminar when on location in France. The remaining eight weeks will 
be spent in Paris, Chartres, and on study tours of important artistic 
centers. The seminar will terminate in France, permitting further 
individual study and travel. No prerequisites; limited to 15 students. 
Applications must be made in the Fall Term. "' 



DA VIDSON IN GERM A N Y 

Davidson's study center in Germany is at Philipps University in 
Marburg on the Lahn. Philipps was founded in 1527 by Philipp the 
Magnanimous as the world's first Protestant university. It now has 
about 12,000 students. The site of the famous disputation between 
Luther and Zwingli in 1529, it houses a world-famous collection of 
materials on the history of religion. Marburg has exerted a special 
intellectual influence on the reformed churches of the world. The 
noted theologian, Rudolph Bultmann, wasa professor in the Philipps 
School of Theology. 

Great men of other disciplines associated with the university 
include the Grimm Brothers and Boris Pasternak, in philology and 
letters; von Savigny in law; Christian Wolff, Herman Cohen, and 
Ortega y Gassett in philosophy; Emil von Behring in medicine; and 
Bunsen, Braun and Hahn in physics. 

The city of Marburg, about 60 miles northeast of Frankfurt, is a 
charming mixture of old and new. It survived World War II almost 
20 intact. 



DA VIDSON IN THE LANDS OF CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY 



A traveling seminar devoted to the study of classical antiquity, 
developed by the Department of Classics, is generally conducted 
each year in the Spring Term. The seminar lasts about ten weeks and 
terminates in Europe. Return travel arrangements are the respon- 
sibility of individual participants, who may return to the United States 
or continue to travel or study in Europe. 

Sophomores and juniors, regardless of major, are eligible. 
Application should be made to the Chairman of the Classics 
Department in September of the academic year in which the student 
wishes to participate. 

The academic program includes student-directed instruction on 
location in Greece, Italy, and Southern France. The professor 
conducting the seminar holds group sessions at selected 
archaeological locations and museums. The seminar carries three 
course credits. 

The professor conducting the seminar makes living arrangements, 
usually involving inexpensive native accommodations and food. 
Group travel is the rule, but sometimes research assignments 
necessitate individual travel in which the student makes his own 
arrangements. 



DA VIDSON IN ENGLA ND 

A program at St. Anne's College in Oxford is sponsored jointly by 
Mary Baldwin and Davidson for 30 students. 77?^ Literature, His- 
tory and Society of Tudorr, Stuart England will be the central 
theme of both lectures and tutorials for the six week session in 
1977. Participants may earn one credit each in history and in 
English. 

Cooperative year-round programs exist also with the University 
of Reading and the University of East Anglia. Davidson has recent- 
ly become a partner with the University College of Buckingham, 
the new and only private university of England. 

DA VIDSON IN SPA IN OR LA TIN AMERICA 

A one-term program began in 1975 for a minimum of ten qualified 
students who wish to study in a Spanish-speaking country for less 
than a full academic year. Freshmen and upperclassmen are eligible, 
regardless of major. A Davidson professor will serve as resident 
director and will be assisted by a professor from the host country in 
teaching, arranging for special projects, and planning activities. Each 
student will take the normal load of three courses, live with a local 
family, and participate in a broad range of course-related activities. 
Program locations will alternate between Spain and Latin America. 21 



TfTTfri 

j. 5 gi i. 



si^^s^^ps^i?*^!!*^!'**^^^ 



WASHINGTON SEMESTER AND RELATED PROGRAMS 



22 



A cooperative arrangement between The American University, 
Washington, D.C., and 118 accredited colleges, including Davidson, 
permits students to spend the spring semester at The American 
University for a study of American government in action. The 
purpose is to provide a realistic picture of the processes of 
governmient through practical analysis and observation. The study is 
carried out through a seminar, an individual research project, and 
either one additional course or an internship. These curriculum 
features are planned to provide a common core of study and a 
reasonable degree of flexibility. The Washington Seminar serves not 
only students majoring in political science but also those in other 
disciplines who desire to deepen their understanding of American 
government. 

The seminar is offered for two course credits and consists 
principally of meetings with public officials, political figures, 
lobbyists, and others active in American national government. 
Meetings are held approximately four times a week with most of 
them occurring at the offices of the speakers concerned. 

The project is an individual research undertaking for one course 
credit which each student has defined in consultation with his 
Davidson professor and which is further defined after he arrives in 
Washington. This is designed to give the student a depth of 
understanding of a single political problem or government activity, 
and to permit the student to explore fully a problem of individual 
interest to him. 

The course which the student may elect in addition to the seminar 
and the project is chosen from the regular curriculum of The 
American University. The internship which may be elected as an 
alternative to the course, is arranged by the student and his instructor 
with an appropriate legislative, administrative, or political office. 

In addition to the regular Washington Semester program, there are 
three related programs available to Davidson students during the 
spring semester. The Washington Urban Semester is designed to 
provide a realistic picture of the urban political system. The Foreign 
Policy Semester is designed to give the student an opportunity to 
observe and study the foreign policy decision-making community in 



Washington. The International Development Seminar is designed to 
permit the student to gain insight into the breadth and complexity of 
the issues concerning international development through a first- 
hand view of the many governmental, international, and private 
organizations in Washington concerned with development. 

The curriculum features of these related programs are similar to 
those of the regular Washington Semester program. 

Tuition is paid through Davidson College by the student, while 
charges for room and board are paid at The American University, 
While especially designed for majors in the social sciences, the 
programs are open to students regardless of their major field, 
provided their academic work has been of sufficiently high quality. 

Students interested in the program are invited to consult with the 
Department of Political Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

A student may earn either a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science 
degree, depending upon the department in which he chooses to do 
his major work. To receive a Bachelor's degree, a student (unless 
enrolled in "special programs" in the Center forSpecial Studies where 
students have individually defined requirements in lieu of any or all 
of these described below) must: 

1. be of good character and conduct, and discharge all college 
financial obligations to the satisfaction of the Comptroller. 

2. complete satisfactorily 36 courses. 

3. achieve a minimum of 72 grade-points on the 36 courses used to 
satisfy graduation requirements. 

For this computation", only the most recent grade will be used 
for repeated courses. 

4. complete the foreign language requirements. 

A student may satisfy the foreign language requirement for 
the bachelor's degree by successfully completing the third- 
term level of a Davidson foreign language course (or its 
equivalent by transfer) or by a proficiency examination grade 
determined by the chairman of the appropriate foreign 
language department as meeting Davidson's requirements. 

5. complete the composition requirements established by the 

faculty. 

All entering students except those with a score of 650 or 
higher on the College Entrance Examination Board Verbal 
Aptitude Test or those with a score of 600 or higher on the 
College Entrance Examination Board English Achievement 
Test must take as part of their normal freshman load either 
Humanities 111-112-113 or English 21 or 22 or 23. 

6. complete all requirements for a major field of study, including 
an average of 2.00 on all the courses in the major and achieve a 
grade of "B" or better in two courses in the major: see each 
department heading in "Courses of Instruction" section of this 

catalog for specific requirements. 23 



when a course is repeated^only the most recent grade counts 
in computing the average. The student may use the same 
course to meet an area requirement and a major require- 
ment. 
7. complete all Area Requirements as follows: 

a. Area 1 — Language, Literature, Music and the Fine Arts. 

(1) Language and Literature. (Departments of Classics, 
English, French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish). 

(2) Art, Music, Drama and Speech (Departments of Art, 
Drama and Speech, Music). 

Requirement: three courses, including at least one course in 
each subdivision. 

b. Area II — Religion and Philosophy (Departments of Religion 
and Philosophy) 

Requirement: Three courses; at least two from Religion. 

c. Area III — Natural Science and Mathematics. (Departments of 
Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics) 
Requirement: Three courses from at least two departments. 
(Philosophy 205 is accepted by the Mathematics Department 
towards the fulfillment of this area requirement.) 

d. Area IV — Social Science. (Departments of Economics, 
Education, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, 
South Asian Studies). 

Requirement: Three courses from at least two departments. 

8. remain in residence at the college for at least two academic 
years (18 courses), one of which mustbethesenioryear (the last 
9 courses.) 

This requirement is interpreted to mean: (1) that, in addition 
to the general residence requirement stated above, astudent 
will normally be required to complete his or herfinal courses 
at Davidson College; (2) that a senior with the approval of the 
Registrar may obtain transfer credit toward graduation by 
attending another college or university during the summer 
preceding hisor hersenior year, even though such credit may 
reduce the number of courses to be completed successfully at 
Davidson in his or her senior year to less than nine; and (3) 
that a student participating in an off-campus program under 
Davidson auspices is considered to be in residence, provided 
the student has at least two academic years of on-campus 
residence. 
All students in the college will receive their degrees either at 
the end of the spring term or of the summer session. Normally 
the final courses may not be completed in the fall term. 

9. satisfy the requirements in physical education, unless excused 
by the college physician. Each student is required to 
demonstrate or attain proficiency in three individual sports and 
to participate on two team-oriented sports. The college 
equipment and facilities will be available to all students who 

24 wish to use them. 



Each student is encouraged and advised to complete in the 
freshman and sophomore years the proficiences and courses 
designated. Service classes in Senior Life Saving, Water Safety 
Instruction, and Red Cross First Aid are available for students 
who need certification for summer employment as camp 
counselors and waterfront directors. 

During each of the student's four years, regular classes or 
tutorials are conducted in most activities. Students who elect to 
take a class will be given the opportunity to take proficiency test 
in the activity through the second Friday in each term only. 

Individual sports include gymnastics, beginning and in- 
termediate swimming, senior life saving, water safety instruc- 
tion, Red Cross First Aid, ballet, modern and tap dance, weight 
training, canoeing, scuba diving, sailing, water skiing, fencing, 
handball, golf, bowling, snow skiing, ice skating, squash 
racquets, raqcquet ball, tennis, jogging, archery, physical 
conditioning, karate, backpacking, rappelling, markmanship 
and cycling. 

Participation on intercollegiate, intramural and club teams 
may count toward fulfilling the two team sports requirement. In 
addition, classes are offered in flickerball, volleyball, softball, 
and basketball. 

The Department of Physical Education determines and 
publicizes proficiency levels for each activity or sport. Bowling, 
snow skiing, and scuba diving are offered at facilities away from 
the campus. A charge will be made for these activities. 




25 



Davidson College is more than an educational program; it is also a 
wide variety of social and learning experiences through which 
Davidson provides opportunities for cultivating friendships and 
having fun, finding a sense of community, developing a personal 
concept of responsibility and values, and applying the knowledge 
learned in the classroom to broader situations. Davidson sets high 
goals, recognizing the special talents and limitations of each student. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Davidson students govern themselves through the senate and 
committees of the Student Government Association, which consists 
of all regularly enrolled students. Davidson had one of the earliest 
studentgovernment constitutions (1910), and the tradition of student 
government at Davidson is strong. Its purpose, as stated in the SGA 
by-laws, is "to share with the Board of Trustees, the Faculty, and the 
Administration the responsibility for developing and maintaining 
Davidson as a superior academic community." 

The student senate, headed by the presidentand vice-presidentof 
SGA, is the governing body. It is made up of three representatives 
from each class and nine from the residence halls in proportion to 
population, and two representatives from the off-campus students. 
Officers and senators are elected by student vote. 

Although activity is centered in the senate, active participation in 
student government is not restricted to elected officials. Students 
from all classes serve on numerous committees of the senate and fill 
student positions on faculty committees. 

THE HONOR SYSTEM AND THE CODE OF RESPONSIBILITY 

Davidson's honor system is a basic component of the college's 
heritage, and one in which both alumni and present students take 
pride. The word "pledged" on an examination paper is the student's 
bond that aid has been neither given nor received; the pledge is 
accepted without question. Self-scheduled exams and the absence 
of proctors pay tribute to a tradition of honor. 

The students themselves take full responsibility for upholding the 
honor code. Each student, before coming to Davidson, signs a 
statement agreeing to live under the Code of Responsibility, which 
includes the Honor System, and the judiciary system of the college. 
Any student found guilty by the Student Hearing Committee or the 
Dean of Students of lying, cheating, or stealing — all honor offenses — 
is ordinarily suspended from the college. 

The Code of Responsibility, which governs student relationships, 
calls upon each student to maintain a standard of behavior that 
upholds community standards and does not infringe on the rights of 
others. The code represents a common-sense approach to personal 
conduct and elicits a high degree of maturity and self-discipline on 
the part of the students. Students are subject to discipline for any 
infraction of the Code of Responsibility. 27 



INVOLUNTARY WITHDRAWAL 



CAMPUS LIVING 



The college reserves the right to suspend, enforce the withdrawal of, 
or expel a student whose academic standing is in its judgment 
unsatisfactory or who violates the Code of Responsibility or college 
regulations. For copies of the Code of Responsibility, write to the 
Office of the Dean of Students. 

The college, upon the advice of its professional staff, may for 
medical or psychological reasons require a student to withdraw 
temporarily from the college (if his health may endanger himself or 
others) while encouraging the student to seek professional care. 



Life at Davidson is democratic in nature, and the small student body makes 
for a friendly atmosphere. Davidson is a residential college; almost 90% of 
the students live in college-owned housing. A limited number of upperclass- 
men desire to live off campus and are given official permission to do so. 
Normally, there is adequate college housing for those who want to live on 
campus. Residence hall spaces are assigned by seniority; a variation in num- 
bers could result in some sophomores having to seek off-campus housing. 

The Director of Student Housing is responsible for the assignment 
of rooms, care of buildings, and counseling of students in problems 
related to living conditions. Roommates and rooms are assigned by 
the director, who makes every effort to see that students are 
congenially paired. Changes in room assignments are made on 
request whenever possible, but no student may transfer f/om one 
room to another without permission. If a freshman is physically 
handicapped in any way, this should be made known to the director 
as early as possible so that special consideration may be given. 

Upperclass students are entitled to a room reservation only after 
they have made the $100 deposit due April 1. 

Each student is responsible for his or her room and its furnishings. 
Each room has beds, mattresses, study desks, chairs, chests of 
drawers, reading lamps, and draperies. All rooms have lavatories. A 
few rooms are singles, but most are designed for two students. 

The seven residence halls (Belk, Cannon, Duke, Little, Richardson, 
Sentelle, and Watts) are brick, thoroughly equipped, steam heated, 
and fireproof. Older buildings have been renovated in the past few 
years; Richardson and Little are air-conditioned, and further air- 
conditioning is planned. Residence halls are usually closed during 
vacation periods, but they are sometimes used during these times for 
conferences at the college. Any student remaining on campus during 
holidays must register with the Director of Housing. 

No solicitation of any kind isallowed in the residence halls, and the 
use of rooms as sales offices or store rooms is prohibited. 

A Residence Hall Association is composed of all resident students 
and operates through a council to promote self-government and 
28 social activities in the residence halls. 



SOCIAL LIFE 



Recognizing that social opportunities are a necessary and important 
part of college life, Davidson seeks to provide a variety of social 
experiences for all students. 



GREY COLLEGE UNION 

The College Union plans campus-wide social, recreational, and 
cultural events, as well as opportunities for pursuing personal 
interests. 

With a new and more spaciousfacility which opened in September 
1975, the Grey College Union is a gathering place for students, faculty 
and visitors. Lounge areas, game rooms, a snack bar, a student store, 
an art gallery and a groupof meeting rooms, student offices and the 
like are used for a wide range of activities. 

A planned program of social and co-curricular presentations is run 
by the College Union Board, composed of students and assisted and 
encouraged by many members of the faculty and staff. Student 
committees are responsible for programs in areas including fine and 
popular films, speakers, art, concerts, games, Broadway plays, and 
poets. 

Social highlights of the year center around three big weekends, 
one each term, open to all students, their dates, and the other 
members of the community. Some special big weekend attractions in 
the past included Chicago, Dionne Warwick, Two Generations of 
Brubeck, The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John Hartford and Josh 
White, Jr. The 900 Room in the Union provides an informal gathering 
place for students as well as professional entertainment. 

The Union works closely with freshmen in residence hall social 
programming and coordinates with Patterson Court for a well- 
rounded social life. 

Special programs created by joint faculty-student committees 
include the Artists Series, which has recently presented Marcel 
Marceau,the National Shakespeare Company, Windom as Thurber, the 
Branko Krsmanovich Chorus of Yugoslavia, and the Fiesta Folklorico. 
The Public Lecture Series has recently included Charles Kuralt, Ralph 
Nader, James J. Kilpatrick, and T. N. Kaul, India's ambassador to the 
United States. 

PATTERSON COURT FRATERNITIES 

The majority of upperclass students participate in the small-group 
social system provided by the nine houses on Patterson Court. Each 
house provides facilities for dining and social life; none have living 
accommodations. Four are national fraternities: Kappa Alpha, Phi 
Kappa Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Fiveare local 
fraternities: Et Cetera, ATO, Emanon, Fanny and Mabel, and PAX. 
Two fraternities, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Phi Gamma Delta, conduct 
their social activities in houses off campus. 29 



lEALTIME 



Affiliation with the Patterson Court fraternities is based on 
individual self-selection. Freshmen are introduced to the fraternities 
by open houses and invitations to meals, and they are invited to big 
dances and informal parties throughout the year. During the v\/inter 
term, freshmen may select the house they wish to join, and every 
effort is made to place them in the house of their first choice. Both 
men and women are eligible for social and dining privileges, 
although some fraternities cannot induct women into national 
membership. 



The dining hall system is flexible and offers a variety of opportunities 
for small-group dining. Freshmen and those upperclassmen who do 
not join a Patterson Court fraternity usually eat in one of the college 
dining houses or the Union Snack Bar, which are operated by the 
college Central Dining Service. A dining club plan offers a meal 
ticket which can be used at all college-operated facilities. These 
facilities are not open during vacation or holiday recesses. 

The Patterson Court fraternities operate their own dining services 
and collect fees directly from members. 



THURSDAY COFFEE AND COKES 



Between 10:00 and 10:30 on most Thursday mornings, students, 
faculty, and staff gather in the Art Gallery of Chambers for coffee, 
cokes, doughnuts, and informal conversation. When schedules 
permit, the President and other members of the administration are 
available for answering questions about college policy or practice. 



OTHER OPPORTUNITIES 



In addition to those already named, Davidson offers many other 
opportunities for broadening the formal classroom experience. 



DRAMA 



The college drama program, open to all students, presents two major 
productions, usually three-act plays, in the fall and spring. In the 
winter, workshop productions of one-act plays are directed by 
students and emphasize experimentation. Many of these plays are 
also written by Davidson students. Tryouts for all productions are 
open to the entire student body. Davidson has no drama majors; 
courses in the Department of Drama and Speech seek to develop 
appreciation of the theatre by expanding theatrical experience. The 
Seminar in Performing Arts class takes an annual theatre trip to New 
30 York. 



FORENSICS 



Forensic activities at Davidson have been growing in popularity in 
recent years. The Eumenean and Philanthropic Literary Societies are 
among the oldest groups on campus. 

Today's forensic program includes participation in intercollegiate 
debate and individual-event tournaments throughout the country. 
Recent teams have placed in the top ten nationally for the schools 
with under 2500 students. Each year qualified students are admitted 
to the Davidson Chapter of Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha, the 
national forensic honorary. In addition to traditional debate, 
students compete in impromptu, extemporaneous, persuasive, and 
after-dinner speaking, original oratory, oral interpretation, and 
radio-television announcing. The experience gives valuable training 
in how to gather and use evidence, organize material, present 
arguments, and offer rebuttal. 



The Art Department encourages all students to explore this creative, 
non-verbal medium of expression. Aseminar is held in Franceduring 
the Spring Term, and the course in Twentieth Century Art includes a 
field trip to New York City. 

The Art Gallery in Chambers houses the permanent collection of prints 
and drawings and hosts exhibits which change monthly. Often the artist 
attends a showing to talk about his work. The annual student art show 
opens in the spring with a showing of experimental films. 



ART 



MUSIC 



The Department of Music offers a wide range of opportunities for 
students interested in singing and in instrumental performance. All 
students are eligible to audition for the Male Chorus, Women's Chorus, or 
the Madrigal Singers or to participate in the choir of a local church. The 
Male Chorus tours during Spring Holidays. These tours have taken them to 
26 states. For the instrumentalists there are various wind ensembles and the 
Wildcat Pep Band. The department annually sponsors a Sacred Music Convo- 
cation with outstanding guest artists for area musicians with a particular 
interest in church music. 

Individual instruction is available in organ, voice, piano, violin, 
flute and brass instruments by special arrangement with the music 
faculty. 

The college sponsors an Artists Series of excellent quality. These 
events are open to the students without charge. Many students like 
to attend some of the professional-level performances by the 
Charlotte Symphony, the Oratorio Singers of Charlotte, the 31 



Charlotte Opera Association as well as the Community Concerts and 
other cultural events in that nearby city. 

ATHLETICS 

Davidson's physical education program emphasizes the carry-over 
value of sports plus the importanceof physical attributes in a person's 
development. 

An active and well-organized intramural program offers a wide 
choice of sports, including flickerball, golf, soccer, cycling, basket- 
ball, volleyball, Softball, swimming, track, wrestling, tennis, handball, 
racquetball, marksmanship, squash, table tennis, orienteering, 
horseshoes, and three-on-three basketball. Teams represent frater- 
nities, dormitories, faculty, staff, and other groups. In 1976-77, about 
eight out of ten students were active in one or more intramural 
activities. 

Davidson College competes in 12 intercollegiate spPrts and is a 
member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the 
Southern Conference. Keen competition, coupled with a realistic 
level for each sport, sets the goals. Even though Davidson is a small 
college, its basketball teams rank in the nation's top college and 
university teams, and many of the varsity games are played in the 
Charlotte Coliseum, which seats over 11, 000. Tennis, go If, and soccer 
teams have also won conference championships in recent years. 
With the exception of basketball, all scholarships are granted only on 
the basis of need. 

Women have intercollegiate teams in tennis, field hockey, and basket- 
ball, and participate with men on the swim team. Most physical education 
classes are coeducational, and there are women's, men's, and 
coeducational teams in intramurals. As the number of women on 
campus grows and interests broaden, more teams will be organized 
for both intercollegiate and intramural competition. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Davidson offers a variety of ways to affirm faith, ask searching 
questions, and be of service to others. Some students participate fully 
in the life and work of area churches, while others express their 
convictions apart from or indifferent to religious institutions. 

A campus minister, the assistant pastor of the Davidson College 
Presbyterian Church coodinates a number of activities, including 
discussion sessions and individual counseling. Very popular are 
Tuesday night services where worship may vary from a 16th Century 
choral evensong to a modern dance interpretation of a Bach chorale. 
At least monthly, a well-known religious leader conducts the service. 
Faculty and staff members, students and others in the community are 
invited to participate in both planning and leading occasions of 
worship. 



There are also small-group opportunities for exploring issues — 
ethics in professions, or the relationship of religion to economic or 
political life. Frequent retreats offer fellowship, understanding, and 
growth. 

For those who want the experience of working with others, there 
are active volunteer programs coordinated by the student YM- 
YVVCA. Some 85 students are now helping with STEP — tutoring 
elementary school children on a one-to-one basis — while others 
are involved with community recreation. Other students are 
working with prison reform, unemployment, low-income housing, 
programs to feed the hungry or day care for children of working 
parents. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Students interested in writing, editing, photography, or broad- 
casting enjoy working with the following: The Davidsonian: a 
weekly newspaper, edited, written, and managed by students. It has 
received an Ail-American rating by the Associated College Press 
twenty times since 1951. The Department of Communications 
publishes Update, a tabloid paper with news of the college, its 
students, faculty, and alumni. Quips and Cranks: the college 
yearbook, a student project. The Wildcat Handbook: a guide 
designed to acquaint students with the traditions, policies, 
activities, and personnel of the college. The Miscellany: a magazine 
managed and edited by student^. It features short stories, reviews, 
I poems, essays, forums, and plays contributed by students, 

' professors, outside writers, and alumni. WDAV: an FM radio 

I station, run by students under the supervision of a faculty-student 

i board of directors. It has a radius often miles and operates each day 

1 from 8 a.m. until 2 a.m. 

' Publications Board: student representatives and appointed 

I members of the faculty which supervises the policy and financial 

I responsibilities of the student publications. 

■ SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS 

The following groups are active on campus and offer opportunities 
for the development of special interests: 

Academic Speciality Clubs: active groups of students and faculty 

members with special interests in physics, mathematics, 

philosophy, psychology, and other disciplines. Their activities vary 

from social occasions to bringing speakers to campus. See also the 

list of honorary societies in the official record. 

, Alpha Phi Omega: a national service fraternity composed of 

I students who wish to carry through college days the ideal of service 

! to college, community, and nation. 

American Guild of Organists: seeks to stimulate interest in organ 
and church music through lectures, discussion, and recitals. „_ 

Affiliated with the Charlotte chapter. 



Archaeology Club: for all students interested in archaeology, 
especially American colonial and prehistorical archaeology (In- 
dians). Regular programs include discussions on history as revealed 
by archaeological techniques, study of techniques, and location of 
sites. 

Black Student Coalition: membership includes all Davidson Black 
students. It seeks to encourage camaraderie among iis constituency 
and to provide ethnic identification for Black students on campus. 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes: dedicated to making the 
challenge of following the teachings of Christ more real and vital 
within the life of the individual athlete. 

Outing Club: seeks to study, explore, and protect wild places in 
North Carolina. Films and seminars supplement outdoor activities 
such as backpacking, mountaineering, orienteering, and white 
water canoeing. Open to all students. 

Photographic Society: student photographers who are not on the 
staff of one of the college publications have available a well- 
equipped darkroom in the new College Union. 

ROCS: for highly motivated students interested in becoming 
more proficient in leadership and military skills through adventure 
training such as mountain climbing, rappelling, or survival 
techniques. Open to both ROTC and non-ROTC students. 

Sailing Club: for experienced and novice sailers, including the 
members of the sailing team, which races intercollegiately. 

Young Democrats and Young Republicans Clubs: designed to 
create an interest in politics and their respective parties, they 
sponsor political programs. 



34 




Ham radio, scuba, and ski groups are sponsored 
by ROTC but open to al! students. Ceramics 
has recently become a popular activity in the 
Union. The pursuit of special interests is encour- 
aged and assisted by the Dean of Students' 
Office and the Union. 



HISTORY 

When Davidson College first opened its doors to students in 1837, its 
65 young men were expected to do manual labor to help pay the cost 
of their education. The manual labor system did not last long, but 
student life at Davidson during the 19th century differed substantially 
from life today. There was little emphasis on sports for physical 
development; students got the exercise they needed by chopping 
wood for their fires and drawing their water from the well. The early 
students lived in the row houses, of which Oak and Elm still stand, 
studied by kerosene lamps, and took their meals at boarding houses 
in the village. Their campus was a meadow from which hay was 
harvested, and before the Civil War its main buildings were the rows 
(dormitories), the chapel, and the Eumenean and Philanthropic 
literary halls. The first faculty consisted of President Hall Morrison 
and two professors, who taught "everything and all day long," even 
before breakfast. 

Today Davidson College has an excellent physical plant, a healthy 
endowment, a loyal and generous group of alumni and friends, a 
student body of over 1 300, an outstanding faculty of approximately 
100, and a reputation for academic excellence in the liberal arts. 
Much has changed since 1837, but the purpose for which the college 
was founded has held firm: to promote "knowledge and virtue" and 
prepare youth for lives of service to humanity. 

Davidson was founded by Concord Presbytery, which committed 
itself to an institution that would be "safe and sound as long as the 
Church is sound." The undergraduate education of ministers was 
one objective, but the college was Christian, not sectarian. The early 
curriculum consisted of studies in moral and natural philosophy, 
evidences of Christianity, logic, mathematics, and classical 
languages. 

The land on which Davidson College is built was acquired from 
William Lee Davidson, and the college was named for his father, a 
brigadier general who died in battle against Cornwallis' troops at 
nearby Cowan's Ford in 1781. The college's early growth was slow, 
but it received a tremendous boost in 1856 when Maxwell Chambers, 
a merchant from Salisbury, gave over $200,000. The first Chambers 
Building was built, faculty was increased, and for a period before the 
Civil War Davidson was the most prosperous liberal arts college 
south of Princeton. But the Civil War wrecked the endowment, and 
in 1867 there were only 25 students enrolled. 

Recovery was slow but steady, and by 1890 the college as it is today 
began to emerge. The first Ph.D.'s were secured for the faculty, and 
the curriculum was expanded to include chemistry, physics, English, 
and history. 

In the 1920s the curriculum was divided into four degrees, two A. B. 

courses and two B.S. courses. One A.B. degree was the basic classical 

course, including two years each of Greek and Latin. The other A.B. 

36 permitted two years of a modern language in place of one of the 



classical languages. The B.S. degrees were for those who majored in 
science or the social sciences. 

Gradually the curriculum expanded. As early as 1927 the 
exceptional student could work on a semi-independent basis in a 
departmental honors program. Accounting, business, and music 
became part of the offerings; seminar courses were begun. In 1957 
the four degrees were changed to two, the A.B. and the B.S., and 
each student took two years each of English and religion; one year 
each of mathematics, history, and a laboratory science; plus a third 
year proficiency in a foreign language. In 1968 the curriculum was 
again revised, to take the form it has today. 

The physical growth of the college paralleled its 
intellectual growth. The first Chambers Building 
burned in 1921, and the best available architect of 
the day was hired to plan its replacement. The 
Jefferson theme, evident in the original 
quadrangle, was retained. Through the generosity 
and support of Presbyteries, The Duke Endowment, 
alumni and other friends, all of whom made 
substantial contributions to the college, dor- 
mitories were built, plus science buildings and a 
gymnasium and a fine arts building. Old buildings 
were remodeled or razed and new ones took their 
place and were added as the needs of the college 
changed. 

Nowhere has this been more evident than in the 
evolution of the college library. Until 1887 there 
were three competing libraries on campus — two 
belonging to the literary societies and one spon- 
sored by the college. In that year the Union Library 
was created by consolidating the three collections 
in the library of old Chambers building. In 1910 the 
first separate building for library services was 
constructed through the generosity of Andrew 
Carnegie. In 1941 the Grey Memorial Library (now 
the College Union) was built, and in 1974 the E. H. 
Little Library, with a capacity of 500,000 volumes, 
became the central hub of intellectual life. 

College buildings, the most visible element of growth, assume 
special meaning because the educational program they house is of 
value. Through the years Davidson's major priorities have been 
maintaining an excellent faculty, a good library, and a sound 
curriculum. A succession of outstanding men as college president 
has ensured that the college would continue to build on its heritage, 
yet move forward to meet contemporary challenges. Davidson's 
doors are open to all races and both sexes, and there is a democratic 
campus social system and a dynamic intramural athletic program. 
The current curriculum, with flexibility as its key, seeks to encourage 
maximum development and individual responsibility. It has been 




37 



said that "Davidson takes a good mind and puts it through the rigors 
of the academy." 

Davidson has believed, and still believes, that a liberal education is 
an adventure of both mind and spirit which can free man from the 
future as well as the past. The details of how that adventure is charted 
have changed since 1837, but the adventure itself is ongoing. 
Davidson's conception of its role in the broad adventure of 
education is expressed in the Official Statement of Purpose: 

STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

Davidson College is an institution of higher learning established by 
the Presbyterians of North Carolina in 1837. Since its founding the 
ties which bind the College to the Presbyterian Church have 
remained close and strong. It is the desire of all concerned that this 
vital relationship be continued in the future, to the mutual advantage 
of church and school. The primary loyalty of the College extends 
beyond the bounds of denomination to the Christian Community as 
a whole, through which medium it would seek to serve the world. 

Davidson recognizes God as the source of all truth. As a college 
committed to the historic Christian faith, it sees Jesus Christ as the 
central fact of history, giving purpose, order, and value to the whole 
life. Davidson is dedicated to the quest for truth and would set no 
limits to the adventures of the mind. Hence, it encourages teachers 
and students to explore the facts of the universe through the full and 
dedicated use of their intellectual powers. Faith and reason must 
work together in mutual respect if Davidson is to realize and 
maintain her vision of excellence in the field of Christian higher 
education. 

In implementing its purpose to promote higher learning, Davidson 
has chosen to be a college, to maintain itself as a small community of 
learners, to emphasize the teaching responsibility of all professors, 
and to ensure the opportunity for personal relationships between 
students and teachers. It is vital that all students, freshmen as well as 
upperclassmen, know and study under mature and scholarly 
teachers who are able and eager to provide for each of them 
stimulus, instruction and guidance. 

In meeting its responsibilities, the College must constantly 
endeavor to provide adequate physical facilities, and to increase its 
financial resources; but more important, it must seek persons of the 
highest caliber for student body and faculty alike. Davidson must 
always seek students of character, of general as well as academic 
ability, of loyalty to the ideals of the College, and of promise for 
future usefulness. In the selection of teachers, it must seek 
individuals of genuine spirituality who are outstanding intellectually, 
who have the best training available in their fields of study, and 
whose interest in the students and in teaching is unfeigned and 
profound. It must also provide these teachers with the time and 
opportunity for creative scholarship which is fundamental to the best 
38 teaching. 



Davidson is a college of liberal arts. As such it emphasizes those 
studies, disciplines and activities which liberate mankind physically, 
mentally and spiritually. Although its curriculum prepares students 
adequately for graduate study, Davidson's primary purpose is to 
develop persons of humane instincts, of disciplined and creative 
minds, and of Christian character for full lives of leadership, of 
service, and of self-fulfillment. The College requires physical 
education, provides for competitive athletics, and encourages varied 
social and cultural activities. It endeavors to teach students to think 
clearly and accurately, to make relevant and valid judgments, to 
discriminate among values, and to communicate freely with others in 
the realm of ideas. Since this can be significantly realized only on the 
basis of an appreciative knowledge of the past and a working 
acquaintanceship with current theory, Davidson concentrates upon 
the study of history, literature, music and the arts, the physical, 
natural and social sciences, languages, mathematics, philosophy and 
religion. 

As body and mind require exercise and nourishment for healthy 
growth, so does the spirit. Davidson maintains, therefore, that a 
college must be a worshipping as well as a studying community, if it is 
to nurture the whole person and is to be genuinely Christian. Hence, 
religious services and activities, as well as courses in religion, form an 
integral part of its program. 

Davidson College possesses a priceless heritage bequeathed by 
those who have given their lives and tifeir possessions for its welfare. 
To it much has been entrusted, and of it much is required. In 
gratitude for what has been accomplished, but in humble recogni- 
tion that it has not fully measured up to its own ideals either in 
learning or in life, its trustees, its faculty, its students and its friends 
must constantly rededicate themselves to their task. Only with divine 
guidance and through ceaseless effort can Davidson attain its goals 
and be what it ought to be. 



DAVIDSON'S PRESIDENTS 

The Reverend Robert Hall Morrison (1836-1840); The Reverend Samuel Williamson 
(1814-1854); The Reverend Drury Lacy (1855-1860); The Reverend John Lycan 
Kirkpatrick (1860-1866); The Reverend George Wilson McPhail (1866-1871); The 
Reverend John Rennie Blake, chairman of the faculty (1871-1877); The Reverend 
Andrew Dousa Hepburn (1877-1885); The Reverend Luther McKinnon (1885-1888); 
Colonel William Joseph Martin, vice-president and acting president (1887-1888); The 
Reverend John Bunyan Shearer (1888-1901). 

Dr. Henry Louis Smith (1901-1912); Dr. William Joseph Martin (1912-1929); The 
Reverend Walter Lee Lingle (1929-1941); The Reverend John Rood Cunningham 
(1941-1957); Dr. Clarence John Pietenpol, acting president (1957-1958); Dr. David 

Crier Martin (1958-1968); Dr. Frontis Withers Johnston, acting president (1968); Dr. „ 

Samuel Reid Spencer, Jr. (1968- ). ^^ 



ADMISSION 

Admission to Davidson is based on many factors, with evaluation in 
two general areas: (1) academic, including achievement as indicated 
by secondary school grades and ability as indicated by testscores; (2) 
personal qualifications as evidenced by participation in and 
contribution to the activities of the school, church, and community. 
Davidson College is committed to its responsibility as a liberal arts 
college within the context of the Christian faith, and it seeks toenroll 
students from a variety of racial, economic, social, religious, and 
geographic backgrounds. Davidson does not discriminate against 
applicants or students on the basis of race, color, or national or ethnic 
origin. 

SECONDARY SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants should be in the senior year of secondary school and 
ordinarily should complete graduation requirements before enroll- 
ment at Davidson. At least 16 high school units are required, which 
should include the following: English 4, intermediate mathematics 2, 
plane geometry 1, foreign language 2, and history 1. Electives should 
include such courses as two or three years of science and additional 
courses in history and mathematics. It is strongly recommended that 
high school students continue in the same foreign language for the 
third and fourth year. 

Candidates considering Davidson should take at least four 
academic subjects each year in secondary school. It is important that 
a strong academic program be taken in the senior year. 

All applicants are required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of 
the College Entrance Examination Board and have an official score 
report sent to Davidson. Registration for the test should be 
completed at least five weeks before the date on which the test is 
scheduled. Either SAT or Achievement tests may be taken on any of 
the following test dates: 

Novembers, 1977 March 11,1978 

December 3, 1 977 May 6, 1 978 

January 28, 1978 June 3, 1978 

It is recommended that juniors take the SAT not later than the end 
of the junior year. This must be done by those interested in the Early 
Decision Plan. Those interested in the Regular Plan musttake the test 
not later than January of the senior year. 

It is recommended, but not required, that applicants take any 
three achievement tests of the College Board not later than January 
of the senior year. Achievement tests in subjects which will not be 
continued in the senior year should be taken in the spring of the 
junior year. Tests should be taken in December or January in subjects 
which will be continued in the senior year. 41 



HOW TO APPLY 



EARLY DECISION 



Students should write to the Dean of Admissionsand Financial Aid as 
soon as they become interested in Davidson. A catalog and other 
material will be mailed promptly. A sheet giving detailed information 
on procedures is attached to the application for admission, which 
will be mailed in September of the senior year in high school. 

The application should be completed and returned to the 
Admissions Office with a $15 nonrefundable application fee. 
Applicants then will receive a transcript form, a personal statement 
form, and three recommendation forms. When these forms are 
completed and returned and the results of the Scholastic Aptitude 
and Achievement Tests are received, the application procedures are 
complete. 

Application should be made as soon as possible in the fall of the 
senior year. The deadline for application under the Regular Plan is 
February 15. Letters informing applicants of the decision on their 
application will be mailed on April 1. Applicants who are accepted 
are required to make a $200 nonrefundable deposit on tuition by 
May 1. 



The Early Decision plan is for realistic applicants who are certain they 
want to attend Davidson. Those accepted under Early Decision have 
approximately the same average scores and class rank as those 
accepted under the Regular Plan. 
To apply under Early Decision, the student should: 

1. Take the Scholastic Aptitude Test in the junior year and have 
the results sent to Davidson by the College Board. 

2. Send a letter with the application requesting Early Decision, 
stating that Davidson is definitely the first choice, application 
has not been made to any other college, and if accepted at 
Davidson, the student will enroll. 

3. Complete all the requirements for admission, and financial aid 
if appropriate, before November 1 of the senior year. 

All students will be notified by December 1. Those not accepted 
will be given full consideration again underthe Regular Plan. Having 
applied for Early Decision in no way jeopardizes chances for 
acceptance under the Regular Plan. Students who wish to do so may 
take the Scholastic Aptitude or Achievement tests again in January. 

Accepted applicants must make a $100 nonrefundable deposit on 
tuition by December 15. Those whose parents he 'e submitted a 
Parents Confidential Statement of the College Scholarship Service 
will be awarded financial aid if, according to the college's evaluation, 
financial need has been established. All accepted applicants will be 
42 considered for Honor Scholarships, and all awards will be made by 

December 6. 



INTERVIEWS AND VISITS 

Interviews are not required in cases where distance poses a 
transportation problem, but students living within a reasonable 
distance of Davidson College definitely should schedule an 
interview between April of the junior year and January of the senior 
year. It is better to visit Monday through Friday in order to attend 
classes and meet faculty members and students. 

Applicants can make arrangements to spend a night in one of the 
dormitories by writing directly to a student or to the Admissions 
Office. 

The Admissions Office is open during the entire year and 
appointments may be made by writing or telephoning (704-892-8021 
before July 16, 1977, or 704-892-2000 on July 16, 1977. and thereafter) 
at least a week before the proposed visit. Appointments may be 
scheduled between 8:30 a.m. and noon, or between 1:30 p.m. and 4 
p.m. Monday through Friday. Between September 1 and December 
1,or between March 1 and May 15, appointments may be scheduled 
on Saturdays between 8:30 a.m. and noon. 

Juniors are requested not to make appointments before April. For 
maximum benefit, seniors should schedule appointments before 
January. 

Students who have completed college level work in secondary 
school and wish to apply for placement or credit at Davidson should 
take the appropriate examinations offered by the Advanced 
Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Interested students whose schools do not administer the ex- 
aminations should arrange to take them at another school. For 
further information, write the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Suite 200, 17 Executive Park Road N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30329. 

Academic credit will be granted for a score of 4 or 5, and at the 
discretion of the department concerned, credit may be given for a 
score of 3. These policies apply to transfers also. 

TRANSFER 

Students wishing to transfer to Davidson should complete the 
requirements for admission listed above and submit a complete 
college transcript and a statement of honorable dismissal. 

Davidson accepts transfer credit from other colleges and 
universities approved by a regional accrediting agency, provided 
each transferred course is consistent with the academic objectives of 
Davidson College and the grade earned in the transferred course is 
comparable to a Davidson grade of "C" or better. Credit for one full 
or normal academic year at another college or university is ^^ 



transferred to Davidson as nine courses; the Registrar determines the 
amount of credit for less than one yearof satisfactory academic work 
at another institution. Credit earned in high school under a joint 
enrollment program is considered as regular college transfer credit. 
Davidson will accept a maximum of 18 transfer courses toward 
graduation. The maximum number of transfer courses accepted for 
the major is determined by the major department. 



FINANCIAL AID 



Davidson College has a comprehensive financial aid program, and 
approximately 40 percent of Davidson students receive financial aid 
from Davidson or someothersource.Themajority of those receiving 
aid from Davidson receive amounts equal to the computed estimate 
of financial need based on the Parents' Confidential Statement, and 
no student should hesitate to apply to Davidson because of limited 
resources. 



WHO IS CONSIDERED 



All applicants for admission whose admissions files are complete by 
February 15 are automatically considered for Honor Scholarships. In 
cases in which there is no financial need, the scholarship may not 
include a stipend. 

If an applicant wants to be considered for any form of financial aid, 
his parents must complete the Parents' Confidential Statement. 
Forms are available in high school guidance offices and from CSS. 
The completed form must be sent to the College Scholarship Service, 
Box 176, Princeton, N.j. 08540, with a request that a copy be sent to 
Davidson. After a student applies for admission, the student will be 
mailed a card-application for financial aid. If the parents have filed a 
financial statement with the College Scholarship Service, thestudent 
must complete the card and return it to Davidson. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



Edward C. Stuart Scholarships: In 1976 the Edward Crosland Stuart 
Scholarships for especially able young men and women were established 
by the Edward C. Stuart Foundation. For 1977-78 two $3000 scholar- 
ships and ten $500 scholarships were awarded to students from North Car- 
olina and Florida who enrolled at Davidson. Financial need is not considered 
in selecting recipients. Ordinarily each scholarship is renewable for three 
additional years. It is expected that the program will be enlarged in future 
years, both in number of scholarships and in the states from which nomina- 
tions are considered. Nominations for consideration are made by secondary 
school principals. While Davidson officials work closely with the Directors 
of the Stuart Scholarship Fund, the selection of winners is made by com- 
44 mittees formed by the Directors. 



Honor Scholarships: Approximately 35 of the most outstanding 
applicants for admission are awarded Honor Scholarships each year. 
In late March those applicants chosen as scholarship finalists are 
invited to Davidson to be interviewed by the Scholarship Committee 
and to be evaluated also for possible invitation to participate in the 
Center for Special Studies. 

Since scholarship finalists are selected from all applicants for 
admission without regard to financial need, it is not necessary to 
apply for consideration. Selection is based on scholastic promise, 
leadership ability, character, and promise of contribution. The 
stipend for each Honor Scholar is based on financial need. In cases in 
which a student does not need financial aid, or has not completed a 
financial statement, he or she will receive an Honor Scholarship 
without stipend or with a token stipend. 

A student receiving an Honor Scholarship is awarded a stipend 
equal to all or the majority of his financial need, eliminating or 
reducing the need for either a loanor a job. In addition, the recipient 
will have a guarantee, as long as his scholarship is renewed, of the 
resources necessary to pay his college expenses for four years. In past 
years, some scholars who have received scholarships without stipend 
for their freshman year have received stipends of $1,000 to $3,000 for 
a later year at Davidson because of a substantial change in the 
financial situation of their parents. 

Scholarships are listed by name in the back of this catalog. 

General Scholarships: In addition to the Honor Scholarships, 
Davidson awards a substantial number of additional scholarships. All 
students admitted are eligible for consideration. These scholarships 
are awarded on the basis of personal qualities, satisfactory academic 
record, contribution to college life, and financial need. Usually they 
are combined with jobs and offers of loans. 

The Scholarship Committee gives special consideration to the sons 
and daughters of ministers and missionaries and to candidates for the 
ministry. 

North Carolina Grants: By action of the State Legislature of North 
Carolina, each private college in the state receives funds equal to the 
number of full-time residents enrolled from North Carolina 
multiplied by $200. From these funds Davidson College makes 
scholarship grants in varying amounts to North Carolina students 
with established financial need. In addition, the State Legislature 
of North Carolina provides a tuition grant of $200 per academic year 
to each full-time undergraduate student who is a legal resident of 
North Carolina and attending a private institution in North Carolina. 

Music Scholarships: A limited number of music scholarships are 
awarded to students who possess a marked degree of proficiencyon 
an instrument or in voice and are in need of financial aid. Awards 
range from $100 to $600 per year, and application should be made 
directly to the Director of Music. 45 



LOANS 



International Scholarships: About 10 International Scholarships 
are awarded each year to nationals of countries other than the 
United States. In most cases these awards are for one year only. They 
vary in amount but may provide tuition, fees, room, board, laundry, 
and books. 

Recipients are selected on a competitive basis with the coopera- 
tion of selection committees in each of the foreign countries and the 
Institute of International Education. Applications should be sub- 
mitted to the Office of International Education at Davidson. 

Army ROTC Scholarships: For men and women, these scholarships pay 
tuition, fees, books and laboratory expenses plus a tax-free allowance of 
$100 per month for up to 10 months per year. Applications for a 4-year 
scholarship must be completed by December 15 of the senior year of high 
school. Interested students may contact the Professor of Military Science at 
Davidson. 

6a5/c Educational Opportunity Grants: Basic Grants provided by 
the federal government are a form of gift assistance based on a 
federal needs-analysis formula. They range in value up to ap- 
proximately $1400. Applications and information are available in 
high school guidance offices, college financial aid offices, and most 
municipal buildings. 



Investment in a college education often requires financing on a long- 
term basis, and some Davidson students borrow up to $1000 or more 
per year for their education. 

National Direct Student Loan Program: Davidson makes loans of 
up to $2500 total for the first two years of college and a maximum of 
$5000 total for the four undergraduate years under the NDSL 
program. No interest is charged while the student is enrolled at 
Davidson. Repayment begins nine months after graduation and may 
extend over a 10 year period. The minimum repayment is $45 per 
quarter. During the repayment period, three percent interest is 
charged on the unpaid balance of the principal of the loan. Loans are 
made only to students who need assistance. 

Federally Insured or Guaranteed Loans: Participating banks or 
commercial lending agencies make loans up to $2500 per year. The 
Federal Government will pay the seven percent interest while the 
student is in school and during authorized periods of deferment 
for: (1) a loan if the "adjusted" family income is less than 

$25,000 or (2) a loan which is based on demonstrated need as 
indicated by the Parents' Confidential Statement. If a loan does not 
meet either of these conditions, the student must pay the interest 
while he is in school. Additional information is available from the 
46 Davidson Financial Aid Office. 



EMPLOYMENT 



Approximately 300 Davidson students have on-campus jobs which 
enable them to finance part of their education. Jobs are awarded by 
the Financial Aid Office as part of the total package of financial aid. 
Assignment to a specific job is made by the Financial Aid Office. All 
students who receive General Scholarships are required to work on a 
part-time basis. Freshmen usually are able to work eight to ten hours 
a week without handicap to their academic work. 



During the summer preceding the academic year, the college 
Comptroller sends each student a complete bill for tuition and fees. 
Scholarship awards made by Davidson College, Basic Education 
Opportunity Grants, and ROTC Scholarships are credited on college 
bills. Outside awards, campus jobs, and loans are not shown as credit. 

Advance payment by mail is requested, as it is easier for both the 
student and the college. 

The comprehensive fee for 1 977-78 is $4,665 payable according 
to the following schedule: 



By April 1 (upperclass students) or 

May 1 (first-year students) 
By September 6 
By January 13, 1978 



Total 



$ 200.00 

$2,132.50 
$2,332.50 
$4,665.00 



Other charges, where applicable, are included in the September bill: 

Freshman orientation fee (payable by all freshmen)$60 

Accident and sickness insurance 
(payable by all who do not request 
exemption; see below) approximately $30 

There is a $10 penalty charge for late payment. No transcripts will 
be released and no diploma will be granted before a student has met 
all financial obligations. 

Students who enter at the beginning of the second or third term 
will be billed at the appropriate percentage of annual fees. 

After the term begins, no refunds on tuition will be made. Fees 
paid in advance for subsequent terms for which a student does not 
register will be refunded in full. Board and laundry are refunded on a 
pro rata basis. 

The Comprehensive Fee includes: 

1. Double occupancy room rent. Single rooms cost somewhat 
more. All students are required to live on campus unless 
officially excused by the Director of Housing. 



FINANCE 

TUITION AND FEES 



47 



2. A full board plan, based on 1 9 meals per week. The college reserves the 
right to adjust the amount as necessary. The plan does not include 
meals during term or holiday recess periods. Upperclass students may 
elect to eat elsewhere, in which case they may deduct $395.00 from 
the September and January payments (a total of $790.00). Upperclass 
students must notify the Comptroller by September if they want to 
participate in the college Dining Club Plan. 

To accommodate those who eat less a reduced board plan is avail- 
able. Full meal plan details accompany the college bill. 

3. Routine medical care (not full health services) at the College Infir- 
mary. A college physician and a registered nurse keep regular office 
hours and are available for emergencies; students are encouraged to 
consult them freely. Additional charges are made for consultation or 
treatment by a physician other than the college physician, extra nurs- 
ing, meals while in the infirmary, medicines, bandages, or other sup- 
plies. These charges are billed directly to the student. 

4. Laundry. The college laundry furnishes bed linens to all single 
students, plus shirt/blouse service and the washing, drying, and 
folding of other laundry. The fee for laundry service, included 
in the comprehensive fee, is required of all single students. Dry 
cleaning and pressing are on a cash basis. 

5. Activity fee. The fee is for student publications, student 
government, the campus radio station, and some social and 
cultural activities. 

6. Applied music fee. The hour-per-week applied instruction 
required of majors by the Department of Music is covered in the 
comprehensive fee, but there are separate charges for additional 
instruction or for private lessons for those who are not music 
majors. Fees per term for individual instruction in voice, piano, 
organ, or orchestral instrument: one hour or two half-hour 
lessons per week, $80; one half-hour lesson a week, $45. Charges 
for use of practice facilities each term, one period daily: organ, 
$15; piano, $10. Use of orchestral instruments per term, $10. 
Payable as billed. 



48 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Insurance: College-sponsored accident and illness insurance is 
available for approximately $30 per student. This fee is included in 
the September billing. Participation is compulsory unless an 
exemption request form, sent to each student with a full description 
of the insurance, is filled out and returned. 

Books: Books and other supplies are available at the college 
bookstore, where all purchases are on a cash basis. The cost of books 
varies with the course of study, but averages approximately $150 per 
year. 

Miscellaneous fees: Fees for late registration, change of courses, 
library fines, damaged property, etc., are payable when incurred. 

Transcripts: Every student is entitled to one transcript of his record 
free of charge. There is a fee of $1 for each additional transcript. 

Fire or theft:Jhe college assumes no responsibility for damage or 
loss of personal property due to fire, theft, or other casualties. The 
parents' insurance may cover such loss. 

Deferred Payments: Davidson College must collect fees in two 
installments, but it recognizes the need of many parents to pay on a 
deferred basis. The college does not endorse any particular plan, but 
a number of parents have satisfactorily used the Insured Tuition 
Payment Plan, Richard C. Knight Insurance Agency, 53 Beacon 
Street, Boston, Mass. 02108. Information is mailed to freshmen and is 
available to upperclassmen on request. Different states and banks 
offer a variety of arrangements, and students are advised to inquire at 
their local banks for further information. 



49 



ART 



Professor Houchens. 
Assistant Professors Jackson, Ligo. 



Area Requirement: Any course under 200 will counttoward the fulfillment of the area 
requirement in Language, Literature, and the Arts. 

Major Requirements: A major is offered in Art with emphasis in studio or history. In 
either casethe requirement is ten courses plus 301 and 401, to be broken down as 
follows: 

Emphasis in studio: Three courses in art history to include 121. Seven studio 
courses and 301 and 401 in studio. 

Emphasis in art history: Three courses in studio to include 125. Seven art history 
courses and 301 and 401 in art history. 



ART HISTORY 

107 AESTHETICS Staff 

Same as Philosophy 107. A study of the philosophy of art through a consideration of the 
conditions and nature of the creation, experience, and criticism of art. 

121 INTRODUCTORY SURVEY Mr. Ligo 

The history of art from prehistory to the p(resent examined in relation to the cultural 
background in which it was shaped. 

132 MEDIEVAL ART Mr. Ligo 

The development of western painting, sculpture, and architecture; beginning with 
early Christian and Byzantine art through the Romanesque and Gothic phases. 

141 RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY Mr. Ligo 
A critical study of painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from 1200-1600. 

142 BAROQUE SEMINAR Mr. Ligo 

A study of the painting of the seventeenth century with special emphasis upon the 
works of Caravaggio, Rubens, and Rembrandt. 

151 NINETEENTH CENTURY PAINTING Mr. Ligo 

The development of pain ting from neo-classicism to neo-impression ism, emphasizing 
primarily the artists of France, and secondarily certain of those in England, Germany, 
and Spain. 

152TWENTIETH CENTURY ART Mr. Ligo 

A study of major trends in twentieth-century painting, sculpture and architecture from 
neo-impression ism to the present. The course will include a field trip to New York City 
which will focus on the city's important contemporary architecture and major 
museums. A fee of $175.00 will be assessed class members to cover costs of 
transportation, housing, theater performances and some meals. 

153 MODERN ARCHITECTURE Mr. Ligo 

A study of the technical and stylistic developments in architecture during the past two 

hundred years with special emphasis upon certain outstanding individual architects. 51 



Art 154 CLASSICAL ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY Mr. Davies 

Same as Classical Civilization 154. Archaeological survey of Aegean civilizations, neo- 
lithic through Hellenistic. Examines contributions of archaelogy to the study of myth, 
literature, art, and architecture, history of ideas, etc. Slide lectures and discussions. 

220, 221, 222 SEMINAR CLASSICS ABROAD Mr. Labban 

Same as Classical Civilization 220-221, 222. A three-course credit seminar offered in 
the Spring Term, limited to a maximum number of 1 2 students; eligibility for applica- 
tion to participate is open to all sophomores and juniors regardless of projected major 
areas of study. Art majors who participate in this seminar can apply two of the course 
credits toward their major, provided that one of these two courses is directed by a mem- 
ber of the art department staff. Seminar will be performed "on location" in Greece, in 
Italy, and in Southern France, and will involve sessions conducted by the faculty direc- 
tor and the participating students. The group will travel together in private automobiles 
consigned to the director, and the seminar will terminate in Europe to allow participants 
to continue travels individually. No prerequisites. Applications must be submitted to 
Professor Labban during the Fall Term. 

225-226-227 SEMINAR IN ART HISTORY IN FRANCE Mr. Ligo 

A three-course art history program open to freshmen, sophomores, or juniors 
regardless of major and, in exceptional cases, to seniors in the Spring Term. The 
program will consist of ten students and will be offered only every other academic 
year. Non-art majors participating in this seminar can apply one course credit toward 
their major providing they nave received advanced approval from their adviser. The 
first two weeks of the seminar will be spent at Davidson researching topics which will 
be presented by the participating students to the other members ofthe seminar when 
on location in France. The remaining eight weeks will be spent in the cities of Paris and 
Chartres or on study tours of important artistic centers in other parts of France. The 
seminar will terminate in France, permitting the student further individual study and 
travel. No Prerequisites. Applications must be submitted to Professor Ligo during the 
Fall Term. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



STUDIO 

125 BASIC STUDIO Staff 

An introduction, through the studio, to the work of the artist — his tools, his ways of 
seeing, methods and media. Basic principles of visual organization will be stressed. 

135 DRAWING Mr. Houchens 

The structure and articulation of natural and nonobjective forms through the use of 
line and tone; analysis of composition. Basic drawing media — pencil, pen and ink, 
wash, pastel, charcoal, and crayon. 

145 PAINTING Staff 

An exploration of various painting media — oil, water color, and acrylic. Emphasis on 
obtaining a basic understanding of pictorial organization. 

146 PAINTING Mr. Jackson 

Attention to the individual's personal response to visual elements. Development of a 
particular medium chosen by the student; special problems. Prerequisite, 145, or 
52 permission of the instructor. 



155PRINTMAKING Mr. Houchens 

Printing with silk screen, woodcut, and experimental relief methods. 

156PRINTMAKING Mr. Jackson 

Experimental studies in intaglio techniques: engraving, etching, dry point, and 
aquatint. 



165 DESIGN 



Mr. Houchens 



Communicative potential of visual material through problems in composition, color 
and light. 



175 FILM 

Filmmaking as an art form. Production of a film. 

295,296,297 INDEPENDENT STUDY 



Mr. Flouchens 



Staff 



For the student who wishes to pursue some special interest in studio or art history 
under the direction and supervision of a start member. Open to non-majors ana 
majors, but for majors must be in some area of concentration other than that of 
Art 301 and 401 . The project must be approved in advance to register for this course. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 
401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Art, Biology 



BIOLOGY 



Professor Daggy. 

Associate Professors D. Grant, Kimmel, Lammers. 

Assistant Professors Case, C. Grant, Putnam. 



Area reauirement: Any biology course numbered between 20 and 199 for which the 
student has the proper prerequisite may be counted toward thefulfillmentof the 
area requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics. The department 
recommends Biology 31 and 32 for students who choose two courses in biology, 
and Biology 21 for those who choose one. 

Major requirements: Each prospective major should discuss his program with the 
Chairman before registration for the junior year. The major requires 12 courses: 
Biology 31, 32; eight courses numbered 100 or above including at least one from 
each of the following groups: (1) Biology 131,132,141; (2) 133, 161, 165, 166; 
(3) 121, 122, 164, 181; (4) 151, 152, 171, 172; and (5) 167, 168, and 191; and 
Extended Studies 301 and 401 . Chemistry 31, 41 , 1 01 , and 102, Mathematics 25 
and either 26 or 23, and Physics 35 and 36 are strongly recommended. Majors are 
encouraged to plan toward group or independent study at an advanced level in 
their senior year. Comprehensive examinations may be given, at the discretion of 
the staff. 

Honors requirements: The departmental honors program is designed to promote 
individual excellence through directed independent study and research. Twelve 
lecture and research courses are required, including Biology 31, 32, 301, and 401. 
The student should plan his program with his faculty advisor such that the 
combination of regular and special courses and research meets, in general, the 
balance of courses specified for the major. The program should be submitted in 
advance for departmental action. Research results must be presented in writing 
and orally to the department or another appropriate forum. The recommenda- 
tion of the department regarding awarding honors will be based upon the quality 
of the course work, the research and its presentation, and a comprehensive 
examination. 



53 



Biology 13 EDIBLE WILD PLANTS Mr. Daggy 

A non-technical study of the rudiments of identification and use of wild plants for 
human food. Some consideration given toother uses of wild plants, e.g. , as medicines. 
Field trips, an overnight survival trip, and preparation of food are usually part of the 
course. No prerequisites. No biology major or area 3 credit given. Offered Spring 
Term. 

21 SELECTED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY Staff 

Designed as a terminal course for the nonscience student. Students who wish to take 
courses numbered over 100 should take Biology 31, 32 first. Emphasis is on Homo 
sapiens and his interactions with the environment as examples of basic biological 
processes. 

31. 32GENERAL BIOLOGY Staff 

Basic principles of biology demonstrated in plant and animal systems. Emphasis is 
placed upon the cell and its functions, inheritance, development, ecology, evolution, 
and the life cycles of the chief groups of plants and animals. One laboratory per week. 
Biology 31 should be taken first. 

121 INVERTEBRATE BIOLOGY— LOWER GROUPS Mr. Grant 

Functional morphology, ecology, and evolution of the lower invertebrate phyla. 
Prerequisite, Biology 31 ,32. 

122 INVERTEBRATE BIOLOGY-HIGHER G ROUPS Mr. Grant 

Functional morphology, ecology and evolution of the higher invertebrate phyla. 
Prerequisite, Biology 31, 32. Not offered 1977-78. 

131 COMPARATIVE ANATOMYOF VERTEBRATES Mr. Putnam 

Gross anatomy of selected vertebrates, with emphasis on the evolution of vertebrate 
organ systems. Prerequisite, Biology 31 , 32. 

132 FUNDAMENTALS OF GENETICS AND EARLY DEVELOPMENT Mr. Kimmel 

Study of the principles of transmission and cytogenetics, both Mendel ian and modern, 
integrated with an analysis of early animal and plant development. Prerequisite, 
Biology 31 . 32, or permission of instructor. 

133 GENE ACTION AND LATER DEVELOPMENT Mr. Kimmel 

Analysis and description of the stages and processes of animal development after 
cleavage integrated with study of the biochemistry of gene action and its regulation 
during development. Prerequisite Biology 132, or permission of instructor. 

141 MICROANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES Mr. Putman 

Lectures emphasize the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate cells and tissues, drawing 
heavily from fine structure to correlate structure and function. Laboratories 
emphasize study with the light microscope and histological technique. Microanatomy 
and macroanatomy are correlated in both lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites, 
Biology 31, 32. 

151 BOTANY— WOODY PLANTS Mr. Daggy 

A study of trees, shrubs, and woody vines. Includes an intensivestudy of the local flora 

and a survey of exotic woody plants. Local field trips and weekend trips to the 

54 mountains and coastal plain. Prerequisite, Biology 31 is recommended. Not offered 

197 7-78. 



152 SYSTEMATIC BOTANY Mr. Daggy Biology 

The general science of plant classification with intensive study of the local flora. Much 
of the time will be spent in field work, including weekend trips to the mountain and 
coastal areas. Prerequisite, Biology 31. 

161 PHYSIOLOGY Mr. Lammers 

An introduction to the basic chemistry and physics of life. Laboratory experiments 
dealing with the activities of living organisms. Prerequisites, Biology 31 , 32; Chemistry 
31,41. 

164 MICROBIOLOGY Mr. Lammers 

The natural history of the viruses and bacteria. Also treats the protists. especially those 
of significance toman. Laboratory work on both the classical and experimental aspects 
of microbiology. Prerequisite, Biology 31 , 32. 

165 BIOCHEMISTRY Mrs. Grant 

Introduction to the intermediary metabolism of living organisms, the properties of 
carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins and their interactions at the cellular level and the 
organization of macromolecules. Prerequisites, Biology 31 ,32 and Chervistry 31 ,41. 

166 MOLECULAR CYTOLOGY Mrs. Grant 

Study of the organization anddynamic interactions of macromolecules v^^ithin cells that 
result in essential cell properties. Emphasis will be placed on integrating molecular 
structure v/ith biological function in a variety of systems. Prerequisite: Biology 31, 32. 

167 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY Mrs. Case 

Study of the ontogeny and phylogeny of neural structure and function, and its relation- 
ship to behavior, perception, and learning. Admission by consent of instructors based 
upon reasonable backgrounds in biology and/or psychology. Relevant courses include 
Psychology 101, 1 1 1-1 1 2 and Biology 31 , 32. Not offered 1977-78. 

168 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR Mrs. Case 

An introduction to the principles of behavior, developed using a diversity of types and 
levels of behavior anci a variety of animal forms. Prerequisite, Biology 31. 32. 

171 ECOLOGY Mr. Grant 

Primarily animal ecology at the population and community levels. Practical studies will 
be carried out in the field and laboratory. Prerequisite, Biology 31 . 32. 

172 VERTEBRATE FIELD ZOOLOGY Mrs. Case 

Identification, habits, and environmental relationships of typical vertebrates of the 
Southeastern region. Emphasis on the various groups of mammals, birds, reptiles, and 
amphibians. Local field trips and occasional weekend trips. Prerequisite, Biology 31 ,32 
or permission of the instructor. 

181 ENTOMOLOGY Mr, Daggy 

Lecture, laboratory, and field courses designed to acquaint the student with insects 
and related arthropod groups. Includes life-cyclesandecology of insects, as well as the 
literature and techniques of entomology. Prerequisite, Biology 31 , 32. 

191 EVOLUTION Staff 

Discussion of major processes and mechanisms, as well as trends in plant and animal cc 

evolution. Prerequisite, Biology 31 , 32. 



Biology 



202SEMINAR 



Staff 



A sroup study of selected topics of biological interest. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite, permission of department. 



203 FIELD BIOLOGY 



Staff 



A summer course designed to broaden biological horizons by offering first hand 
contacts with plant and animal life in physiographic provinces and biological life- 
regions remote from the student's ordinary educational experiences. Trips have been 
made to the Rocky Mountain area and to Mexico. Prerequisites, Biology 31, 32. 
Offered by arrangement. 



204 GROUP INVESTIGATION IN BIOLOGY 



Staff 



Small group study of special topics in biology. Given at the option of the department 
open to students by departmental permission. Prerequisites, Biology 31, 32; 
appropriate 100-level course when applicable; permission of department. 



295,296,297 INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION IN BIOLOGY 



Staff 



Investigative work on a semi-independent level under staff guidance. Results of the 
work must be presented as a seminar and written report. Open to juniors and seniors 
with permission of the department and the professor in charge. The student is 
expected to initiate a program well in advance. 



299 SENIOR HONORS THESIS 



Staff 



One-term preparation of the results of independent research conducted by candidates 
for departmental honors. The v^'ritten thesis and its oral defense partially fulfill the re- 
quirements for honors. Prerequisite: acceptance by the department into the Biology 
Honors Program. -' 



301 EXTENDED STUDIES EOR JUNIORS 
401 EXTENDED STUDIES EOR SENIORS 



Staff 



Options include seminars, independent or small group field or laboratory research, 
literature research, hospital work, Off Campus Term, or other acceptable programs, 
within the department or on an interdisciplinary basis. Offerings will vary from year to 
year. Early inquiry and planning are often mandatory. 



OFF CAMPUS BIOLOGYTERM 



Staff 



A term at a research facility away from Davidson, under the supervision of a member of 
the Biology Department Faculty. Students register for the appropriate 100-level 
course. Biology 295 and Extended Studies. Permission of the department required. 
Offered by arrangement. 



56 




CHEMISTRY 



Professors Bryan, Fredericksen. 

Associate Professors Burnett, Gable. 

Assistant Professors Carroll, Nutt, Schuh. 



Area requirements: Any course numbered 20 or above will count toward the 
fulfillment of area requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics. 

Placement tests: The department will offer placement tests prior to the beginning of 
the Fall Tc i to advise students on the best approaches to their chemistry 
programs. 

The department will offer a special non-credit tutorial program to those students 
with inadequate preparation for Chemistry 31. It is suggested that such students 
participate in the tutorial program in the Fall Term prior toenrolling in Chemistry 
31 in a subsequent term. 

Students with exceptional high school chemistry backgrounds are invited to take 
a special placement test. Students making a satisfactory score on this test may 
begin their study of chemistry with Chemistry 41. Interested students should 
consult with the Chairman. 

Major requirements: 

(1) Chemistry 31, 41, 101, 102, 121, 122, 301, 401 plus two courses selected from: 
Chemistry 110, 130, 140. 

(2) Supporting and prerequisite cours'es: Mathematics 25 and 26, Physics 35 and 36. 

(3) German is the recommended language but another language might be more 
suitable in some cases. Mathematics 23 or experience in programming computers 
is desirable. 

Each prospective major should discuss his program with a department 
representative early in the freshman year. The prerequisites for advanced courses 
require careful planning to obtain a feasible program. 

Special Attainments Program: The following program is certified by the American 
Chemical Society as an approved undergraduate major in chemistry. This 
program is strongly recommended to all majors who plan to study chemistry in 
graduate school or to seek employment as a professional chemist. 

(1) Chemistry 31, 41, 101, 102, 110, 121, 122, 130, 140, 301, 401 plus any two of the 
following: 210, 220, 230, 240, 250. 

(2) Supporting and prerequisite courses: Mathematics 25 and 26, Physics 35 and 36. 

(3) German 16 or 20 is strongly recommended. 

(4) Approved mathematics or physics courses may be substituted for one of the 
courses numbered above 200. 

(5) Chemistry 301 and/or 401 must include at least 60 hours of laboratory research. 

21 THE SCIENCE OF CHEMISTRY Mr. Gable, Mr. Schuh 

An introduction to the science of chemistry and its relation to modern society. The 
laboratory provides experience in the scientific approach to problems with an 
emphasis on the evaluation and interpretation of experimental data. This course is 
designed for students who do not plan to take additional courses in chemistry. It is not 
designed as preparation for Chemistry 31 and cannot be taken for credit after 
Chemistry 31 has been taken for credit. One laboratory meeting per week. 

31 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY Mr. Bryan, Mr. Gable, Mr. Nutt, Mr. Schuh 

Topics include chemical bonding and structure, elementary solution equilibria, and 
introductory chemical kinetics. The laboratory includesexperience in gravimetricand 
optical methods of quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or 
permission of the department Chairmun. One laboratory meeting per week. 57 



Chemistry 41 INORGANIC CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Mr. Bryan, Mr. Burnett 

An advanced consideration of ionic equilibria in aqueous solutions and of descriptive 
chemistry of thie elements. The laboratory includes volumetric and potentiometric 
methods of quantitative analysis as well as qualitative analysis for inorganic substances. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 31, Advanced Placement credit, or special examination; 
prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 25. Two laboratory meetings per week. 

101 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Carroll, Mr. Fredericksen 

An introductory course in organic chemistry including a study of the properties, 
structure, and synthesis of organic compounds. The laboratory includes the use of 
some instrumental techniques. Prerequisite: Chemistry 41 . One laboratory meeting 
per week. 

102 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Carroll, Mr. Fredericksen 

A continuation of the study of organic compounds with emphasis on the theoretical 
treatment of structures and reactions. The laboratory includes an introduction to 
quantitative procedures and advanced synthesis of organic compounds. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101. One laboratory meeting per week. 

106 BIOPHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. Schuh 

Physical chemistry and its application to biochemical systems. Topics include 
necessary mathematical background, thermodynamics applied to intermediary 
metabolism, enzyme kinetics, eauilibria, and physical properties of proteins. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 and Physics 36. 

110 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS 

Mr. Carroll, Mr. Fredericksen 

An integrated application of classical and instrumental techniques to organic structure 
determination. Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. Two laboratory meetings per week. 

121 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. Gable, Mr. Nutt, Mr. Schuh 

A molecular approach to chemical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Cfiemistry 41, 
IVIathematics 26, Physics 36. One Laboratory meeting per weel^. 

122 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. Gable, Mr. Nutt, Mr. Schuh 

Chemical kinetics followed by a discussion of quantum concepts and their 
applications to spectroscopy anci the structure of matter. Prerequisite: Chemistry^2^. 
One laboratory meeting per week. 

130 INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS Mr. Bryan. Mr. Burnett 

Optical, electrical, and physicochemical methods of instrumental analysis are 
surveyed including the design and function of major types of instruments. Prerequisite 
or corequisite: Chemistry 122. Two laboratory meetings per week. 

140 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Bryan, Mr. Nutt 

The application of modern theories of physics and chemistry to inorganic chemistry. 
The laboratory deals with inorganic syntheses and determination of structure. 
Prerequisites or corequisite: Chemistry 122. One laboratory meeting per week. 

SEMINARS, TUTORIALS, INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH 

These courses are offered upon student request and with the consent of the Chemistry 
Department Chairman. During the Winter Term the department will announce suggest- 
ed topics for the following academic year. Students will be invited to suggest topics. 
Normally two courses selected from the student-faculty suggestions will be offered 
58 each year. 



201 SEMINAR Staff Chemistry 

A study of selected topics in chemistry. 

210 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Carroll, Mr. Fredericksen 

Selected topics and theories in organic chemistry. Admission by consent of the 
Chemistry Department Chairman. 

220 ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. Gable, Mr. Nutt, Mr. Schuh 

Selected topics in physical chemistry. Admission by consent of the Chemistry 
Department Chairman. 

230 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Mr. Bryan, Mr. Burnett 

Selected topics in analytical chemistry. Admission by consent of the Chemistry 
Department Chairman. 

240 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Mr. Bryan, Mr. Nutt 

Selected topics in inorganic chemistry. Admission by consent of the Chemistry 
Department Chairman. 

250 ADVANCED BIOCHEMISTRY Mr. Schuh 

Selected topics in biochemistry. Admission by consent of Chemistry Department 
Chairman. 

295 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH Staff 

Designed for any qualified student who desires to pursue some special interest in 
chemistry. Admission by consent of the Chemistry LDepartment Chairman following 
acceptance of the student's written research proposal. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES EOR JUNIORS Staff 

Each junior majoring in chemistry shall, by the last week of the term preceeding the 
term of enrollment, submit to the Chemistry Department Chairman for approval a 
proposed plan of extended studies in accordance with the department's published 
guidelines. Possible programs include both experimental laboratory projects and 
literature research projects. Students are encouraged to select a topic of special 
interest to them ana to begin the extended studies early in the year. Students in the 
Special Attainments Program should plan to spend at least 60 hours in an experimental 
project for Chemistry 301 and/or 401. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES EOR SENIORS Staff 

Each senior majoring in chemistry shall, by the last week of the term preceeding the 
term of enrollment, submit to the Chemistry Department Chairman for approval a 
proposed plan of extended studies in accordance with the department's published 
guidelines. Possible programs include both experimental laboratory projects and 
literature research projects. Students are encouraged to select a topic of special 
interest to them and to begin the extended studies early in the year. Students in the 
Special Attainments Program should plan to spend a total of at least 60 hours in an 
experimental project for Chemistry 301 and/or 401. 



59 



CLASSICS 

Professor Labban. 
Associate Professor French. 
Assistant Professor Davies. 

Area Requirements: Any course in the department numbered 121 or above will count 
toward the fulfillment of the area requirement in Language and Literature (Area I, 
1). Classical Civilization 154 or one course from Classical Civilization 220, 221, 
222 will satisfy the requirements in the Fine Arts (Area 1,2). 

Language Requirement: Completion in course or by placement examination of Greek 
121 or Greek 122 or Latin 131 or Latin 132satisfies the foreign language proficiency 
required for the degree. The Departmentof Classics offers a major either in GreeK 
or in Latin. 

Major in Creek: Nine Greek courses above Greek 2, including Greek 201, 301, and 401; 
Classical Civilization 154 or one course credit from Classical Civilization 220, 221 , 

222. 

Major in Latin: Nine Latin courses above Latin 12, including Latin 202, 301, and 401: 
Classical Civilization 154 or one course credit from Classical Civilization 220, 221 , 
222. (An exemption from Latin 1 31 or Latin 1 32 reduces to eight the number of 
required Latin courses. See under "Placement Tests" below.) 

Placement Tests: Students who have had Latin in secondary school will take a 
placement test, the score of which will determine their initial placement at the 
college level. A student may be exempted by qualifying scores on placement test 
from Latin 11, Latin 12, Latin 131 or Latin 132. 

GREEK 

1 BEGINNING GREEK Staff 

A course for beginners in classical Greek grammar, with emphasis on inflection and 
syntax. Practice in translation and composition. Study tapes available for use in the 
language laboratory. 

2 INTERMEDIATE GREEK Staff 

Continuation of study of basic grammar. Reading of selected Greek excerpts relating 
to mythology, history, and fables. Prerequisite, Creek 7. 

121 READINGSONTHELIFE ANDTEACHINGSOFSOCRATES Staff 

A study of one or more works by Plato or Xenophon in the original Greek. 
Prerequisite, Creek 2, or by placement test with consent of instructor. 

122 NEW TESTAMENT GREEK Mr. Labban 

A study of one of the Gospels and of selected letters of Paul in the original Greek. 
Exegetical interpretation of the texts. Whenever there is sufficient demand for Greek 
122, it will be the course which normally will follow Greek 121. Prerequisite, Creek 121 
or consent of the instructor. 

123 to 129 ADVANCED READING IN CLASSICALGREEK Staff 

Intensive study of the works of selected Greek authors. Literary and historical 
criticism; required work in bibliography. The content of courses in this series will be 
determined in consultation with the instructor. If arrangement is made with the 
department in advance, these courses may be taken any term for elective credit or to 
complete the major requirement. The prerequisite for Creek 123 is Creek 121 or Creek 
122: the prerequisite for each course higher than Creek 123 is the previous course in 
60 the numerical sequence. 



201 SENIOR TUTORIAL Staff Classics 

Directed independent study on a selected topic of classical Greek antiquity, with 
original source materials as the basis for the study. Prerequisite, six Greek courses 
above Greel< 2. 

295,296,297 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For students who desire guided readings and directed research in certain materials in 
ancient Greek. Prerequisite, Greek 2 and consent of the department chairman. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

Completion of prescribed reading list, with final oral examination. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

Written thesis. 



LATIN 

11 BEGINNING LATIN Staff 

An intensive course for beginners in basic Latin grammar and syntax. Elementary 
practice in translation of adapted passages from ancient authors. 

12 INTERMEDIATE LATIN * Staff 

Work in translating. Reading in genuine Latin literature selections which utilize and 
enlarge the fundamentals already acquired. Prerequisite. Latin 77 or qualifying score 
on placement test. 

131 LATIN PROSE AND POETRY Staff 

In this course the skills acquired in Latin 11-12 are developed by reading longer 
passages of classical Latin prose and verse. Further training in Latin prose composition. 
Prerequisite, Latin 12 or qualifying score on placement test. 

132 READINGS IN LATIN LITERATURE Staff 

Latin prose and poetry from various periods. The material read will be determined in 
consultation with the instructor, with reference to the interests and level of 
proficiency of the individual student. Though this course is equivalent in level to Latin 

131, Latin 132 is designed primarily for students who have learned the rudiments of 
Latin before coming to Davidson. Prerequisite, Latin 12 or qualifying score on 
placement test. 

1 33 to 1 39 ADVANCED READING IN CLASSICAL LA FIN Staff 

Intensive study of the work of selected Latin authors. Literary and historical criticism; 
required work in bibliography. The content of courses in this series will be determined 
in consultation with the instructor. If arrangement is made with the department in 
advance, these courses may be taken any term for elective credit or to complete the 
major requirement. The prerequisite for Latin 133 is Latin 131 or Latin 132; the 
prerequisite for each course higher than Latin 133 is the previous course in the 
numerical sequence. 

202 SENIOR TUTORIAL Staff 

Directed independent study on a selected topic of Roman antiquity, using Latin source 
materials as bases for the study. Prerequisite, five Latin courses above Latin 131 or Latin 

132. 61 



Classics 295,296, 297 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

For students who desire guided readings and directed research in certain materials in 
Latin. Prerequisite, Latin 12 and consent of the department chairman. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

Completion of prescribed reading list, with final oral examination. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

Written thesis. 



CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

The courses listed below do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin. Open to all 
students except where stated otherwise. 

15 INTRODUCTION TO TERMINOLOGY BASED ON GREEK AND LATIN Staff 

Training in the linguistic and semantic analysis of specialized terminology (medical, 
scientific, etc.). Principles of generating new terms in accordance with classical 
models. 

151 GREEK VIEWS OF MAN AND WOMAN Mr. Davies 

Portrayals of man and woman by Greek writers from the Age of FHomer through the 
Flellenistic period. Readings in epic poetry, and one or more of the following: lyric 
poetry, the nistorians, Plato's myths. An effort is made, through lecture and discussion, 
to determine some of the assumptions about human experience underlying the 
works. Among subjects considered are: the heroic ideal, its evolution and its relation 
to the non-heroic: the individual and the community: literary forms as reflections of 
human experience. ^ 

152 GREEK DRAMA IN TRANSLATION Mr. Labban 

A close study of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, 
with an aim at understanding the theological, moral, ethical, political, and social 
implications of their drama. A treatment of Greek mythology is included. 

153 GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN ART AND LITERATURE Mr. French 

A study of Greek Mythology, including the background of Near Eastern myths and 
legencfs, its treatment by Greek poets and artists and its legacy among the Romans. 
Selected readings in translation from the Near Eastern texts and from Greek and Latin 
authors and assignments in modern interpretation will be supplemented by lectures 
and discussions dealing with the religious and historical background of the individual 
myths and by illustrations of the material with slides. 

154 CLASSICAL ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY Mr. Davies 

Same as Art 154. Archaeological survey of Aegean civilizations, neolithic through 
Hellenistic. Examines contribution of archaeology to the study of literature, art and 
architecture, historv of ideas, etc. Slide lectures and discussions. This course will satisfy 
the requirement or Area 1 , 2. 

210 SEMINAR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES Staff 

Special study of topics not ordinarily covered in other courses. May include any area of 
classical civilization, or of classical influences on later civilization, the specific subject 
matter to be determined by interests of students and staff. Does not ordinarily require 
knowledge of Greek or Latin. Examples of possible topics: the Alexander romance, 
62 comparative mythology, classical influences on English literature. 



220,221,222SEMINAR IN CLASSICS ABROAD Staff Classics, Drama 

(Note also under Department of Art: Art History 220, 221 , 222.) 

A three-course credit seminar offered in the Spring Term, limited to a maximum 
number of 12 students; eligibility for application to participate is open to all 
sophomores and juniors regardless of projected major areas of study. Seminar will be 
performed "on location" in Greece, Italy, and in Southern France, and will involve 
sessions conducted by the faculty director and by the participating students. The 
group will travel together in rented automobiles consigned to the director, and the 
seminar will terminate in Europe to allow participants to continue travels individually. 
No prerequisites. Applications must be submitted to Professor Labban during the Fall 
Term. 

295,296,297 INDEPENDENT STUDY PROJECT Staff 

For students who desire guided readings and directed research in some area or in a 
specific topic of classical antiquities which they are interested in pursuing. No 
knowledge of Greek or Latin is needed for this course. A term paper is required. 
Prerequisite, consent of department chairman. 



DRAMA AND SPEECH 

Associate Professor Barber. 

Assistant Professor Cornell. 

Instructor Gardner. 



Area Requirement: A student may count any course numbered between 20 and 200 
toward the fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature, and the 
Arts. Courses above 200 may be counted with the consent of the department. 

Students with problems in voice and diction should contact a member of the 
Department for counseling. 

Dramatic Literature and Theatre. The Interdisciplinary Program in Dramatic Literature 
and Theatre offered through the Center "or Special Studies is designed for juniors and 
seniors who are interested in relating literature and theatre. The dual emphasis on 
dramatic literature and theatre arts will permit the student to explore plays of classical, 
European, British, American and Oriental origin in conjunction with a history of 
theatre and independent study in the student's area of special concern. For further 
information contact the Dean of the Center for Special Studies or the chairman of the 
Drama Department. 

21 THEATRE ARTS Staff 

An examination of the materials of creative expression in theatre. Readings, 
discussions, lectures, field trips and laboratory problems will increase the student's 
understanding of theatre as one aspect of the liberal arts experience. Baciiground in 
ttieatre not required. 

37 INTRODUCTION TO THE PRINCIPLES OF ORAL COMMUNICATIONS 

Mrs. Cornell 

A study of the techniques of oral communication. Readings, discussions, lectures, 
examinations of contemporary speeches along with individual participation will 
increase the student's awareness of medium. 



63 



Drama 33 ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE Mrs. Cornell 

Theories and practices of argumentation, debate and forensic speaking with emphasis 
upon researcn, testing of evidence, and application of principles in inter-collegiate 
competition. Students must enroll in fall term and participate in the fall, winter, and 
spring terms to receive credit. 

41 ELEMENTS OF THEATRE ARTS Mr. Gardner 

An in-depth examination of theatre from the standpoint of the audience. Lectures, 
readings, reports, discussions and field trips will add to the student's understanding of 
theatre as an art form. Prerequisite: Drama 21. 

51 ORAL COMMUNICATION Mrs. Cornell 

An in depth study of the principles of persuasion, different modes of organization of 
materials and performance with special application to those students who are in pre- 
law, pre-ministerial studies, or who intend a career in politics, teaching, or business. 
Prerequisite: Drama 31. 

131 THE ART OF THE FILM Mr. Gardner 

A course designed to increase the undestanding and appreciation of the art of te film. 
Readings, lectures, and discussions will be augmented with selected films to illustrate 
the effectiveness of the cinema as an art form. Not a course on movie making. Three 
class periods and one laboratory per week. 

141 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE Mrs. Cornell 

Designed to add another dimension to the appreciation and enjoyment of literature 
by oral presentation, the course is concerned with the critical analysis of literature and 
with the techniques involved in translating that interpretation into an oral form. 
Emphasis will be placed on individual and group participation. 

171 STUDIES IN AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS Mrs. Cornell 

A study of practices and methods of selected major American orator's from Jonathan 
Edwards to present time. 

181 STUDIES IN BRITISH PUBLIC ADDRESS Mrs. Cornell 

A study of practices and methods of selected major British orators from the 17th 
century to present time. 

201 THEATRE STUDIO I Mr. Barber 

Group study of theatre problems and practices applied through the presentation of 
studio productions with an emphasis on acting and production. Prerequisites. Drams 
21 or consent of the instructor. 

202 THEATRE STUDIO II Mr. Gardner 

Advanced group study of theatre problems and practices applied through the 
presentation of studio productions with an emphasis on audience — actor 
relationships. Prerequisite: Drama 27, 201. 

205 HISTORY OF THEATRE I Staff 

A study of the development of the theatre from Ancient Greece through eighteenth- 
century Europe, including the development of dramatic theory as well as theatrical 
practices. Restricted to juniors and seniors. 

206 HISTORY OF THEATRE II Staff 

Continuation of Drama 205. Theatre development from the nineteenth century to the 
present. May be taken u'ithout Drama 205 by students not enrolled in the Special 
64 Program for Dramatic Literature and Theatre. Restricted to juniors and seniors. 



209 SEMINAR IN PERFORMING ARTS: OPERA AND DRAMA Mr. Barber Drama, Economics 

Same as Music 209. Consists of a thorough analysis of selected operas and dramas. An 
integral part of the course will consist of observation of live performances in the area, 
culminating in a field trip to New York City. A fee of $250 will be assessed class 
members to cover costs of performances, transportation, and housing where applicable. 
Prerequisite: Music 21 and /or Drama 21, or consent of instructor. Open to juniors and 
seniors only. 

SEMINARS IN THEATRE ARTS Staff 

Designed for the advanced student who wishes concentrated study in a specific 
theatre arts areas. Prerequisite: Drama 21 or the consent of the instructor. Open to 
juniors and seniors only. A student is limited to one per term. 

m PLAYWRITING 

222 DIRECTING 

223 ACTING 

224 STAGE DESIGN 

225 COSTUME DESIGN 

226 THEATRE HISTORY 

227 SEMINAR IN THEATRE ARTS— SPECIAL STUDY Staff 

Open to students at any level. Offered as needed. 



ECONOMICS 



Professors Nelson, Patterson, Ratliff. 

Associate Professors Avinger, Kincaid. 

Assistant Professor Lindsey. 



Area Requirement: Any course numbered in the 100's will count toward the 
fulfillment of the area requirement in social science; however, the department 
recommends Economics 101. 

Major Requirements: Courses 101, 102, 103, 104 (or Mathematics 23 or 148) 301,401: 
and a minimum of five courses chosen from among the 110, 120, 130 and 200 series, 
with at least three of the four series being represented. 

Honors Requirements: in addition to meeting the major requirements stated above, 
honors candidates will satisfy Economics 301 requirements by participating in a 
seminar in which they will read and discuss selections not normally included in 
course materials, be introduced to research areas, and focus attention on 
specifically defined research topics. Honors candidates, in addition to satisfying 
tne regular requirements of Economics 401, will write an honors thesis and defend 
it oralfy. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL ECONOMY Staff 

A studv of the theories and institutions that organize and direct economic activities of 
modern man. The course is designed to prepare the student for intelligent 
understanding of domestic and international economic problems upon which every 
citizen must pass judgment, to serve as a foundation for further work in economics, 
and to complement study in other areas. 



65 



Economics 102 MONEY, INCOME AND employment Miss Nelson 

Intermediate macroeconomics with special emphasis on the operation and control of 
monetary and banking systems and the role of money in economic activity; monetary 
theory; current monetary policy and problems. Prerequisite, Economics 101 or 
consent of instructor. 

103 THE PRICE SYSTEM Mr. Avinger 

Intermediate microeconomic theory; a more advanced treatment of the central core 
of economic theory — value theory. The production and consumption activities of 
individual economic units are analyzed. Areas of concentration include the theory of 
consumer behavior, cost analysis, production and distribution theory, general 
equilibrium, and welfare criteria. Prerequisite, Economics 101 or consent of instructor. 

104 STATISTICS Mr. Lindsey 

Theories and techniques of statistical analysis; probability, estimation and confidence 
intervals, tests of significance and hypotheses, regression and correlation, time series 
analysis and principles of index numbers. 

111 INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING Mr. Lindsey 

A comprehensive study of the theory and problems of valuation of assets, application 
of funds, corpoi ation accounts and statements, and the interpretation of accounting 
statements. 

112 MANAGERIAL AND INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING Mr. Lindsey 

A study of the more complex problems in various areas of accounting, with emphasis 
on theoretical background and presentation. Includes cost accounting concepts and 
utilization of accounting data in planning and control of operations. Prerequisite, 
Economics 111. 

113 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS Mr. Kincaid 

A study of decision models for financial and non-financial problems such as 
production scheduling, capital budgeting, inventory, and pricing. Emphasis is on the 
theoretical basis for the various models studied as well as on the applicability of the 
models to solutions of realistic problems. 

115 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS Mr. Avinger 

The application of mathematical analysis to economic theory. The calculus, 
differential and difference equations, ana matrix algebra are applied to the theory of 
consumer behavior, the theory of the firm, and production ana distribution theory. 
Other topics include input-output analysis and game theory. 

121 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Mr. Patterson 

A study of the technological, institutional, and intellectual developments and forces 
that have exercised major influences and effects on the form and nature of the United 
States economy from colonial to modern times. 

122 MACROECONOMIC ANALYSIS Miss Nelson 

Neoclassical and Keynesian theories of aggregate economic activity; national 
economic accounting systems; economic fluctuations; critical consideration of 
macroeconomic policy and problems. Prerequisite. Economics 102 or consent of 
instructor. 

^ 123 INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION Mr. Avinger 

Emphasis upon the theory, measurement, and history of the firm-structure of 

American industry, actual production and pricing policies, and criteria for evaluating 

66 industry conduct and performance. Government policies toward American industry — 

antitrust; regulation of public utilities, transportation, and communications; and 



public ownership — are discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite, Economics 101 or Economics 

consent of instructor. 

124 LABOR ECONOMICS Mr. Patterson 

Astudy of the history of the labor movement in the United States; of the organization, 
government, and activities of trade unions; and of labor legislation and the effects of 
the legislation on trade union activities. 

125 PUBLIC FINANCE Mr. Ratliff 

The public sector and economic welfare; public sector expenditures, revenues, and 
debt management; fiscal policy. Prerequisite, Economics 101 or consent of instructor. 

131 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Mr. Ratliff 

The development and nature of economic thought from the ancient Greeks to the 
present, with particular attention to the classical, Marxian, Austrian, neoclassical, 
institutional, and Keynesian schools. 

132 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS Mr. Patterson 

A study of the theoretical bases and the institutional characteristics of market-oriented 
and planning-oriented economic systems with special emphasis on the economies of 
the United States and Western Europe and the Soviet Union. 

133 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Miss Nelson 

Analysis of economic development and growth in underdeveloped economies; 
comparative studies of advanced and *jnderdeveloped economies; policies to 
promote development and growth. 

134 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Mr. Kincaid 

Fundamental principles of international economic relations, including the economic 
basis for international specialization and trade, policies affecting trade, the balance of 
international payments, and international finance. Prerequisite, Economics 101 or 
consent of instructor. 

135 ECONOMICS OF SOUTH ASIA Mr. Ratliff 

A study of the economic features, problems, and policies of the region. 

201,202 SEMINAR Staff 

Reading, research, papers, and discussion on current problems in economics. Each 
staff member will announce in advance the particular topic or area of his seminar. 
Permission of instructor required for enrollment. 

295,296 INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH Staff 

Designed for the student who desires to pursue some special interest in economics. 
The research proposal must be approved in advance. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 

Each junior majoring in economics shall, by the beginning of the winter term of his 
junior year, submit to the Department for approval a proposed plan of Extended 
Studies. By definition, the scope of possible programs is extensive, and students are 
urged to be imaginative in pursuing their particular interests. The Department will 
furnish the student guidelines and suggestions for Extended Studies at the beginning 
of his junior year. 



67 



Economics, Education 401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Each senior majoring in economics shall satisfy the extended studies requirement by 
taking a comprehensive examination in economics vv'hich will include the GRE 
advanced test in economics. By mid-term of the winter term he shall submit to the 
Department (1) a list of the economics courses he has taken or is taking, (2) a list of 
economics books he has read or is reading, (3) the periodicals he is following to keep 
abreast of current events, and (4) a substantial research paper that he has written. 



EDUCATION 



Professors EHight. Kelton, Ostwalt. 



Area Requirement: Any course for which the student has the proper prerequisite may 
be counted towara the fulfillment of the area requirement in Social Science. 

Teacher Certification: Davidson College is approved by the North Carolina State 
Board of Education to grant North Carolina A-Certificates at the secondary school 
level in the fields of English, Mathematics, Foreign Language (French, German, 
Latin, Spanish), Natural Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Social Science, 
Economics, History, Political Science, or Sociology. Through reciprocity agree- 
ments, the North Carolina certificates are accepted in thirty additional states at 
the present time. For more information, see Tiie Director of Teacher Education or 
the Chairman of the Department of Education. 

121 HISTORY OF EDUCATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE Mr. Ostwalt 

Traces historical development and underlying philosophies of educational institutions 
and practices in the Western World from the Classical to the Modern Periods; 
considers the roles and functions of the school in relation to other social institutions 
such as the state and the church. 

141 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Ostwalt 

Same as Psychology 141. Individual development from infancy through adolescence, 
with emphasis on physical and motor, mental and language, emotional and social 
development. Includes special study of psychoanalytic, cognitive and behavioral 
theories of development. Prerequisite, Psychology 101. 

142 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Ostwalt 

Psychology of learning and teaching. Includes study of major contemporary learning 
theories, retention, transfer, motivation, educational measurement, and guidance. Some 
attention will be given to selected aspects of educational technology, reading, and assess- 
ment of individual behavior. Prerequisite, Psychology 1 01. 

146 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT Mr. Kelton 

Same as Psychology 146. Elementary treatment of the history, theory, and techniques 
of psychological measurement. Attention is given to the measurement of intelligence, 
academic achievement, personality, interests, differential, and special aptitudes. 
Includes limited experience in test administration and interpretation. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 101 . To he offered even numbered years. 

152METHODSOFTEACHING Mr. Hight 

Study of procedures for the effective organization and presentation of subject matter 
in particular academic disciplines at the high school level. Up to one-fifth of this 
course will be taken under the direct supervision of one or more Davidson College 
professors in the academic discipline of anticipated certification. Includes directed 
observation and limited experience in classroom teaching. Prerequisite, approval of 
College Committee on Teacher Education. 



212,214 INTERNSHIP IN TEACHING Mr. Hight Education, English 

Begins with extensive classroom observation, and concludes with three weeks of full- 
time teaching; minimum of 115 class periods of supervised teaching experience. 
Credit: Two Courses. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. 

216SEMINAR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION Mr. Hight 

Study of the history and function of the secondary school, secondary student, and the 
secondary school curriculum. Some attention will be given to diagnostic and remedial 
procedures for use with students in the high school environment. Prerequisite, 
approval of the instructor. 

275 SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN EDUCATION Staff 

Topics will vary according to the educational objectives and preferences of interested 
groups of students. Prerequisite, approval of ttie instructor. 

295,296,297 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EDUCATION Staff 

Independent study courses in education require individual research and study in 
amounts and under conditions specified in a written contract arranged no later than 
the end of the first week of the term in which credit is to be authorized. The contract 
must include a project title, a summary statement of project objectives and proposed 
activities, a preliminary bibliography, specified evaluation criteria and techniques, and 
a schedule of conferences with the instructor. Prerequisites, approval of the department 
chairman and acceptance of the contract by the faculty sponsor. 



ENGLISH 

Professors Bliss, Cole, Lloyd. 

Associate Professors Abbott, Cornweli, Holland. 

Assistant Professors Nelson, Ziegler. 

Area Requirement: Any English course numbered 21 or higher may be counted 
toward the fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature, and the 
Arts (Area 1,1). 

Major Requirements: Ten English courses numbered above 100, including one course 
from each of the four areas listed below, one seminar, 301, and 401. Only one 
interdisciplinary and only one advanced writing course may be counted toward 
the major in English. 

Areas and courses within each area are defined as follows: 

Area I: English literature to Milton— 101,111,112,113, 114, 115, 165, 214. 

Area II: English literature from Milton to 1832— 102, 121,122. 123, 124, 161. 

Area III: English literature from 1832to the present— 103, 131, 132, 133, 134, 161. 

Area IV: American literature— 104, 1 05, 1 41 , 1 42, 1 43, 1 45, 206. 

Honors Requirements: (1) Eight courses numbered above 100, including four seminars 
and, in the senior year, English 295. (2) Each honors candidate will take a written 
examination in two of the four areas listed above during the spring term of his 
junior year. (3) At the end of his senior year each honors candidate will be 
examined on his thesis, on a genre to be chosen from the list in the departmental 
handbook, and on one of the two areas not previously elected. This examination 
will be both written and oral. 69 



r- ij L^ 27-23 These courses are designed for the student who wants an introductory course in 

o literature as well as practice in rhetoric; hence both area credit ancJ credit in 

composition will be siven for each course. There will be regular written 
assignments, with emphasis on short papers. Not open to juniors and seniors. 

21 ART OF PROSE Staff 
A study of the major prose forms, with emphasis on the essay and fiction. 

22 THE ART OF THE POEM . Staff 
Introduction to the critical reading of poems. 

23 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE Staff 
A study of poetry, fiction, and drama. 



101-105 These survey courses are recommended for freshmen and sophomores who 
are contemplating a major in English. 

101 ENGLISH LITERATURE TO MILTON MissZiegler 

English literature from its beginning through the Renaissance, with special emphasis 
on Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne. 

102 ENGLISH LITERATURE: MILTON TO 1832 Mr. Cole 
English literature from Milton through the Romantic period. 

103 ENGLISH LITERATURE SINCE 1832 Mr. Holland 
English literature from the Romantic period to the present. 

104 AMERICAN LITERATURE BEFORE 1870 Mr. Nelson 
Origins, nationalistic developments, and the American Renaissance. 

105 AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1870 Mr. Nelson 

Realism and naturalism with particular attention to contemporary literature. 

Cour5e_s numbered 777 and higher are not open to freshmen except by permission of 
the instructor. 

111 CHAUCER Mr. Cornwell 
The major poems with some attention to other writers of the period. 

112 SHAKESPEARE'S POETIC DRAMAS Mr. Bliss 
Critical reading of selected plays. 

113 SHAKESPEARE Mr. Lloyd 
The tragedies and histories: a selection. 

114 LITERATURE OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE Mr. Cole 
Elizabethan sonneteers, Spenser, jonson, Donne, and the metaphysical poets. 

115 ENGLISH DRAMA TO 1800 MissZiegler 

A survev of English drama from medieval times to the end of the eighteenth century, 
-jQ excluding Shakespeare. 



121 MILTON Mr. Cole 
The poetry and selected prose. 

122 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE • Mr. Cole 
Intensive study of Swift. Pope, Johnson, and Boswell. 

123 ROMANTIC LITERATURE Mr. Lloyd 
Poetry and prose of early nineteenth-century England. 

124 ENGLISH NOVEL TO DICKENS Mr. Holland 
A study of the origins of the novel in England and the principal novelists to Dickens. 

131 VICTORIAN LITERATURE Mr. Holland 
Readings in the prose and poetry of the period. 

132 ENGLISH NOVEL FROM DICKENSTO THE PRESENT Mr. Holland 
A study of selected works of English fiction from the Victorian period to the present. 

133 MODERN DRAMA Mr. Abbott 
A study of major American, British, and European dramatists of the last hundred years. 

134 MODERN POEMS IN ENGLISH ^ Mr. Bliss 

The development of modern poetry in English, from Hopkins through Stevens, with 
some attention to contemporary poems. 



English 




71 



English 



141 AMERICAN FICTION: NINETEENTH CENTURY Mr. Cornwell 
Major emphasis on Hawthorne, Melville, Mark Twain, James, and Crane. 

142 AMERICAN FICTION: TWENTIETH CENTURY Mr. Cornwell 
A study of the short story, novella, and novel in the present century. 

143 LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH Mr. Nelson 

Regional survey from literary beginnings to the present, with particular attention to 
the Southern Renaissance. 



145 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND RELIGIOUSTHOUGHT 



Mr. Abbott 



Same as Religion 145. A study of the religious thought of major American writers from 
the 17th century to the present. Emphasis on Edwards, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, 
Faulkner. An inter-disciplinary course with Mr. Rhodes. 



149 LITERATURE AND THEOLOGY 



Mr. Bliss 



Same as Religion 149. The discovery and critical discussion of theological implications 
in selected twentieth-century fiction, drama, and poetry. An inter-disciplinary course 
with Mr. McKelway. 



161 LITERARY CRITICISM 

Analytical and comparative reading of major critical works. 

165 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 



Mr. Lloyd 



Mr. Lloyd 



A study of the historical development of English and of the grammar of the language in 
its present state. Designed for tnose who plan to teach English and for English majors. 



171 ADVANCED WRITING 

Fiction and other genres. Prerequisite, permission of instructor. 



Staff 



72 




172 ADVANCED COMPOSITION Staff 

Prose: expository and analytical writing for upperclassmen. 

175 FILM AS NARRATIVE ART Mr. Cornwell 

A study of the relationship between prose narrative and film, with emphasis on the 
literary origins and backgrounds of selected films.verbal and visual languages, and the 
problems of adaptation from novel and short story to film. 

195 FANTASY AS LITERATURE Mr. Cornwell 

A study of the forms of fantasy with particular attention to the following topics: the 
definition of the genre, the mythopoeic qualities of the works, and the role of 
language in fantasy. Emphasis on Tolkienian fantasy and science fiction. 

Courses numbered 202-253 are seminars limited to ten upperclassmen with 
preference to English majors; permission of instructor required. 

202 WOMEN WRITERS Miss Ziegler 

A study of the role of women as authors, focusing on the work of Jane Austen, Char- 
lotte Bronte, George Eliot, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf, and a variety 
of modern short story writers, including Doris Lessing, Flannery O'Connor, and 
Katharine Mansfield. In addition to the works themselves, readings will be drawn from 
essays, biographies, and critical studies. 

206 JEWISH-AMERICAN FICTION * Mr. Lloyd 

A study of novels and short stories in English by American Jewish authors. 

214 DONNE AND SPENSER Mr. Cole 

An intensive study of the Poetry of Donne and Spenser. 

234 YEATS Mr. Bliss 

Reading of William Butler Yeats' poems, plays, and prose. 

253 CLASSICIAN CHINESE POETRY IN TRANSLATION Mr. Holland 

A close reading of selected poems from the beginnings of Chinese poetry to the Sung 
Dynasty, with some attention to cultural background and to varieties of twentieth- 
century English translation. 

Both 295 and 296 are open also to non-English majors. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY AND/OR THESIS Staff 

296 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CREATIVE WRITING Staff 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

Preparation for and passing of a three-hour written comprehensive examination in the 
spring term of the junior year on two of the four areas listed above. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

Preparation for and passing of a three- hour written comprehensive examination in the 
spring term of the senior year on the two areas not elected for examination in English 
301. 



English 



73 



FRENCH 



Professor Walker. 

Assistant Professors Dockery (in Montpellier 1977-78), Jacobus, Yoder. 

Visiting Professor Fcubert. 



Area Requirements: Any course numbered 20 or above will count toward the 
fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature and the Arts. 

Language Requirement: Completion of French 20 meets the foreign language 
proficiency required for the degree. 

Major Requirements: Seven French courses numbered 130 or above, of which 136 or 
the equivalent, and either the sequence 141-2-3 or three courses in literature of 
the 19th and 20th centuries are required. French 401, with comprehensive 
examination in the Spring term of the senior year. Students who do not study in a 
French-speaking country are required in the third term of their junior year to 
follow a program of independent study. French 301 in the junior year. 

IHonors Requirements: In addition to the courses and comprehensive exahination 
required for the major, the candidate for honors will take the FHonors Course, 
French 208-209, during his senior year, will present an FHonors Thesis and take an 
oral honors examination in French. 

Placement of Freshmen: FHigh School preparation and achievement examination 
taken at Davidson College will be used for placement in French 1, 11, 20 or 136. 
Students who have achieved fluency in speaking and reading French and 
adequate knowledge of French civilization, including literature, will be excused 
from the language requirement after special examination. All students desiring 
placement will taKe the achievement examination at Davidson College. 

Study Abroad: Courses at the University of Montpellier on Davidson College foreign 
study plan may be submitted for courses beyond French 20 with the approval of 
the department and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Study in France is 
strongly recommended for all French majors. 

I BASIC INTENSIVE FRENCH Staff 

An intensive introductory course using modern learning techniques. Requires five to 
ten iTOurs work per week in the language laboratory. 

10 ELEMENTARY FRENCH Staff 

Continuing development of skills in spoken French and concentration on developing 
reading skills. Work in language laboratory is an integral part of the course. 
Prerequisite, French 7. 

II CONTINUING FRENCH Staff 

Spoken and written French for students offering two or more years of high school 
French who do not meet the competency required for entrance into French 20, 135, or 
136. Work in language laboratory is an integral partof the course. Not open to students 
who have taken French 1. 

16 READING FRENCH Staff 

Limited to one single aspect of language study — learning to read as quickly as possible. 
Open only to juniors or seniors having already met the degree language requirement 
and who have no previous credits in French in either high school or college. Offered 
74 on demand and with consent of the department. 



20 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH Staff French 

Continuing development of skills in spoken and written French, with extensive 
reading, and introduction to writing French. Work in language laboratory is an integral 
part of the course. Prerequisite, French 1-10 or 11, or by placement examination. 

134 VOCABULARY BUILDING Staff 

Application of linguistic methods to the acquisition of new words and idioms in 
French. Extensive oral and written exercises in word derivation, synonymy, and 
semantic analysis. Special focus on the problem of anglicisms. Prerequisite: French 20 
or equivalent. 

135 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE Staff 

Readings of representative authors, grouped by genres, with oral and written analysis. 
Study of literary forms, themes, and criticaf methods. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite, French 20 or equivalent. 

136 FRENCH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION Staff 

Training to develop fluency of the student already proficient. Prerequisite, French 20 
or equivalent. 

137 FRENCH CIVILIZATION Staff 

Reading, discussion, and presentation in French of the social, economic, and political 
structure of France, its geography, history, music, and art. Prerequisite, French 20 or 
equivalent. Required for sophomores*going to France on jYA Program. 

138 CONTEMPORY FRENCH CULTURE Staff 

An investigation of aspects of contemporary French society conducted on the scene in 
France. Open to all students participating in the Davidson Junior Year in Montpellier. 

139 THEMES AND IDEAS IN FRENCH LITERATURE Staff 

Readings and analysis of works from various periods around a chosen theme. Examples 
include: exile and alienation, commitment and society, love, the hero, nature. In 
French. Prerequisite French 20. 

141 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 17TH CENTURY Staff 

A study of the rise and development of French Classicism. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite, French 135, 139, or permission of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 

142 FRENCH CLASSICAL DRAMA Mr. Walker 

The works of Corneille, Racine and Moliere. Conducted in French. Prerequisite, 
French 135, 139, or permission of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 

143 A MAJOR FRENCH DRAMATIST Mr. Walker 

Intensive study of the works of a classical dramatist. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite, French 135, 139, or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate 

years. 

144 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 19th CENTURY Staff 

The development of French literature in the 19th century with reading of 
representative works. Conducted in French. Prerequisite, French 135, 139, or 
permission of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 

145 FRENCH NOVEL OF THE 19TH CENTURY Staff 

A study of the development of the French novel with reading of representative works. 

Conducted in French. Prerequisite, French 135, 139, or permission of instructor. 75 

Offered in alternate years. 



French 146 FRENCH POETRY FROM BAUDELAIRE TO RIMBAUD Mr. Jacobus 

Through a study of the giants of modern French poetry, an attempt to determine the 
nature of poetry, in particular, symbolist lyrics are analyzed. Special scrutiny of 
linguistic, psychic, and temporal structures in the poetic process. In French. 
Prerequisite. French 135, 739, or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate 

years. 

TUTORIALS, SEMINARS, AND INDEPENDENT STUDY 

These courses are offered on demand (unless otherwise stated) and with the consent 
of the department. 

201 FRENCH LITERATURE 1100-1600 Mr. Yoder 

Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance with emphasis on the medieval epic 
and romance, Villon, Rabelais, Montaigne, and the Pleiad. 

202 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 18TH CENTURY Mr. Dockery 

The development of French Literature in the 18th century with reading of rep- 
resentative works. 

203 ADVANCED FRENCH LANGUAGE Mr. Walker 

Advanced study of French grammar, composition, translation, and phonetics. 
Prerequisite, French 736 or equivalent. 

204 SENIOR SEMINAR Staff 

Advanced study of the development of French literature with readings in areas not 
previously covered by the student. Prerequisite, French 141-2-3. or 144-5-6, or the 
equivalent. 

206 FRENCH LITERATURE 1890-1940 Staff 

French literature since 1890. Study of major literary movements and figures of the 
period. Conducted in French. 

207 CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE Staff 

French literature from 1940 to the present. Emphasis on new forms of novel, theatre, 
and poetry. Conducted in French. 

208-209 SENIOR HONORS AND THESIS Staff 

210 AFRICAN LITERATURE IN FRENCH Mr. Yoder 

An introduction to African literature in French, focusing on Africa south of the Sahara, 
but including works from North Africa. Special attention given to social, political, and 
prophetic roles of writers before and after independence. The course includes, but is 
not limited to, works by Laye, Oyono, Ousmane, Senghor, Diop. Kane, and Dib. 

211 FRENCH CANADIAN LITERATURE Mr. Dockery 

A survey of representative novelists, dramatists, and poets of French Canada from 1930 
to the present. Special emphasis on the difficulties of survival of French language and 
culture in North America and the struggle for political and cultural self-determination 
in Quebec. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

A program of independent study designed to familiarize students with various aspects 
76 of French civilization. 



401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Staff 



French, German 



Projects in literary criticism for seminars. Comprehensive examination in the Spring 
term. 




GERMAN 



Professor Pinkerton . 
Associate Professors Epes, Winkler, Wruck. 



Area Requirement: Any course numbered 20 or higher may be counted toward the 
fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature, and the Arts. 

Language Requirervent: Completion of German 20 meets the foreign language 
proficiency required for the degree. 

Major Reauirements: Seven courses above the 20 level, which must include 151, 152, 
153, or their equivalents; 301,401. 

Honors Requirements: Seven courses above the 20 level, which must include 151, 152, 
153, or their equivalents, 291, and a comprehensive examination during the third 
term of the senior year. The Extended Stuaies requirement for the junior year is met 
by independent study, under direction of a staff member, from the departmental 
reading list. This study represents partial preparation for the comprehensive 
examination, which is the senior year Extended Studies requirement. 

Placement of Freshmen: Achievement examinations taken previously or at Davidson 
College will be used for placement or exemption. Students having studied German 
in high school will be placed in German 10, German 20, or at a higher level (which 
exempts the language requirement) depending upon the examination results. 
Students failing to place in German 20 or higher, but with two years of high school 
German, should normally take German 11 but may take German 10. 

Study Abroad: Courses taken at the Philipps University, Marburg, under the Davidson 
College Foreign Study plan may be suDstituted for courses beyond German 20 with 
the approval of the department. With such approval in aclvance, credit will be 
granted for other courses (e.g., at a Goethe-lnstitut) upon satisfactory completion of 
an examination. Study in Germany is strongly recommended for all German majors. 



11 



German 1 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I Staff 

For beginners. Extensive oral drill, grammar, and reading of selected German texts. 
Simple conversation and composition. Credit will not be given without German 20 
unless the foreign language proficiency requirement has already been satisfied. Work 
in the language laboratory is an integral part of the course. 

10 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II Staff 
A continuation of Elementary German I 

11 INTENSIVE CONTINUING GERMAN Staff 

An intensive review of elementary German, designed specificallv for those students 
who have previously studied some German, but who fail to place above German 10. 
The course substitutes for German 10 for such students, and prepares for admission to 
German 20. 

16 READING GERMAN Staff 

An accelerated introductory course designed specifically for those students who need 
a reading knowledge of German, Open only to students who have passed the degree 
requirements for foreign language, who have no previous credit for German, and who 
have shown aptitude for the study of foreign language. 

20 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN Staff 

Continued drill in grammar, conversational practice and extensive reading of selected 
texts, toward the end of developing the ability to cope with German of moderate 
difficulty. Work in the language laboratory is required in the interest of speaking and 
comprehension skills. 

151 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE— NINETEENTH CENTURY 

152 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE— TWENTIETH CENTURY 

Close reading of selected masterpieces of the period. Intensiv^e practice in 
composition and conversation about the works read. Prerequisite tor eittter course: 
German 20. or its equivalent, or by consent of staff. 

153 ADVANCED GERMAN, COMPOSITION. AND CONVERSATION Staff 

A course, to be conducted largely in German, to give students practice in writing 
German and in developing the student's spoken German. Prerequisite, Gernnan 20 or 
equivalent or consent of staff. 

SEMINARS AND TUTORIALS 

The following courses will be seminars and tutorials. Those courses offered in a gi\en 
term will be determined by needs of students and availabilitv of personnel. 
Prerequisite, 757, 752 or equivalent and with consent of the staff. 

201 GERMAN LINGUISTICS 

202 MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN LITERATURE 

203 RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

204 THE BAROQUE ERA 

205 THE EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (1700-1748) 

206 GOETHE 

207 SCHILLER 

'^^ 208 ROMANTICISM 



209 NINETEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE AFTER THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT German, History 

210 TWENTIETH-CENTURY LITERATURE 

211,212 STUDIES IN GERMAN LITERATURE OR LINGUISTICS 

Topics to be arranged on demand and to include periods and topics other tfian those 
listed in 201 through 210, and to include genres. 

291 SENIOR THESIS 

This course may be taken during any term of the senior year. The student will do 
research leading to a thesis under the guidance of one or more members of the 
department. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

Independent study, under the direction of a staff member, from the department 
reading list. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

Comprehensive examination. 

HISTORY 



Professors Lester, Patterson, Spencer. 

Associate Professor Partin. 

Assistant Professors Edmondson,* Rice. 

Instructors Boulton, Shi. 



Area Requirement: Any course in history may be counted toward the fulfillment of the 
area requirement in social science. Credit for history obtained in the Humanities 
Program or by the Advanced Placement Examination in American or European 
History of the College Entrance Examination Board may also be counted toward 
the fulfillment of the area requirement. 



Major Requirements: Eleven courses are required for a ma)or in history, including: 

I. History 101, 102 or completion of the inter-disciplinary humanities course, 

The Western Tradition. 
II. A sequence of courses in two of the following fields of history: 

A. /\nc/en(. History 121.122 

B. Med/'eva/, History 123,124 

C. European, 1300-1715, History 131, 132 

D. European since 1715, any three courses from History 135, 136, 137, 138 

E. fngfc/i, History 151, 152 

F. United States, any three courses from History 161 , 162, 165, 166 

III. At least one seminar in history 

IV. Historv 301,401, Extended Studies 

V. Additional history courses to fulfill the departmental requirement for a major 

of eleven courses 
VI. The attainment of an acceptable score on the Graduate Record Examination 
Advanced Test in History by the end of the second term in the senior year. 

In planning their major programs, students should bear in mind that the great 
majority of questions on the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test in 
ITistory are in European, English, and United States History. Students con- 
templating graduate study in history are strongly advised to take History 111. 79 

*0n leave Spring Term, 1977-78. 



History Honors Requirements: Twelve courses are required for the departmental honors pro- 

gram in history. Candidates for admission to the honors program must have com- 
pleted the work of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years at Davidson with 
an overall average of 3.5 , must have taken History 1 01 , 1 02, or the inter-disciplin- 
ary humanities course, at least one sequence in a field of the departmental offer- 
ings for a major in history, a seminar, and must have written a distinguished junior 
essay in History 301 . The remaining courses in the history honors program, which 
are taken in the senior year, include a second sequence if not previously taken, 
History 111, History 401 , and the writing of a thesis (History 298, 299). For the 
completion of the honors program the History Department requires the attain- 
ment of a distinguished score on the Graduate Record Examination Advanced Test 
in /-iistory by the end of the second term in the senior year. 



101 WESTERN CIVILIZATION IN THE MEDIEVAL AND EARLY 

MODERN PERIODS TO 1660 Staff 

An introduction to the evolution of Western Civilization from the decline of Rome to 
the seventeenth century, focusing upon cultural, intellectual, and political 
developments in the medieval and early modern periods. Treatment will be topical 
rather than chronological or narrative, emphasizing the transition from ancient to 
medieval society, the contributions of Christianitv, manorialism and feudalism, the 
medieval empire, the urban revival and rise of the bourgeoisie, the emergence of 
centralized monarchies, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the Great Age of 
Spain. Not open to students taking the Humanities Program, juniors, and Seniors. 

102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION SINCE 1660 Staff 

An introduction to the evolution of Western Civilization since the seventeenth 
century, focusing upon cultural, intellectual, and political developments in the rise of 
modern Europe. Treatment will be topical rather than chronological or narrative, 
emphasizing the consolidation of modern nation-states, the Scientific Revolution and 
Enlightenment, the revolutionary current of 1789-1848, ideological currents in the 
nineteenth century, and the origins of twentieth century totalitarianism. Not open to 
students taking the Humanities Program, juniors, and Seniors. 

Ill HISTORIOGRAPHY Mr. Patterson 

A study of the nature and purpose of history, various schools of historical 
interpretation, and works of representative historians of Classical and Western 
Civilization. 

121 THE ANCIENT WORLD TO ALEXANDER THE GREAT Mr. Rice 

Pre-literary history; the ancient river civilizations of Egypt and Mesopotamia; the 
empires or the Near East; the pre-Greek civilization; and tne Hellenic period of Greek 

history. 

122 THE ANCIENT WORLD: THE HELLENISTIC AND 

ROMAN PERIODS Mr. Rice 

Greece in the Age of Alexander the Great; the Hellenistic monarchies; the rise of 
Rome; the Roman Republic; and the Roman Empire to the age of Constantine. 

123 THEEARLY,MIDDLE AGESTO A.D.1000 Mr. Boulton 

The Later Roman Empire from the age of Constantine; the decline of ancient 
civilization; the development of Christianity and the rise of the papacy; the Barbarian 
Invasions and Germanic Kingdoms; the Byzantine Empire; the growth of Islam; the 
Carol ingian Empire; the feudal system, manorialism, and the cultural development of 
80 the Early Middle Ages. 



124 THE LATER MIDDLE AGES, A. D. 1000-1500 Mr. Boulton History 

The revival of town life; the conflict of empire and papacy; the Crusades; growth of 
the dynastic monarchies; church and state; economic expansion and cultural 
developments of the Later Middle Ages. 

131 EUROPE DURING THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION Mr. Patterson 

A study of the economic, social, political, and cultural changes in Europe during the 
era of transition from medieval to modern. Deals with the period from about 1300 to 
1560. 

132 EUROPE DURING THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY Mr. Patterson 

The crisis of late sixteenth and seventeenth-century Europe and the revolutions in 
Spain, the Netherlands, France, Germany, and England. The character of theemerging 
states and national cultures of Europe from about 1560 to 1715. 

135 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE Mr. Partin 

A studvof the major social, political, and ideological currents in Europe from the death 
of Louis XIV to the end of the Napoleonic era. Particular emphasis is placed upon the 
Enlightenment and the French Revolution. 

136 NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE^ Mr. Partin 

A study of European history from the Congress of Vienna to the eve of the First World 
War. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of liberalism, nationalism, and 
technology upon continental politics and diplomacy. 

137 THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD, 1914-1939 Mr. Edmondson 

A brief survey of the origins and course of World War I; an analysis of the world 
between the two global conflicts, with particular emphasis on the problem of peace- 
making, the development of new political, cultural, and social forms, and the stirring 
of the non -western areas; and an examination of the breakdown of collective security 
and the outbreak of World War II. 

138 THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD SINCE 1939 Mr. Edmondson 

A brief survey of World War II; an intensive examination of the origins and course of 
the Cold War; an investigation of the end of colonialism and the rise of the non- 
western nations; discussion of recent social and cultural developments. Not offered 
1977-78. 

151 ENGLAND TO 1688 Mr. Lester 

A survey of English constitutional and legal development before 1485 and a more 
intensive study of the political and social history of the Tudor and Stuart periods. 

152 ENGLAND SINCE 1688 Mr. Lester 

A study of the political and social history of England since the Revolution of 1688, 
with some attention to the evolution of the British Empire-Commonwealth. 



161 THE UNITED STATES TO 1815 Mr. Lester 

The British colonies in America after 1 763, the American Revolution, the formation of 
the Union and the Constitution, the rise of political parties, and the conduct of foreign 
relations. 

162 THE UNITED STATES FROM 1815 TO 1865 Mr. Lester 

The awakening of nationalism, the development of sectionalism, the growth of democ- 
racy, territorial expansion, ante-bellum reform movements, and the Civil War. 81 



History 165 THE UNITED STATES FROM 1865 TO 1921 Mr. Shi 

The evolution of urban-industrialized America, with emphasis on the problems of Re- 
construction, the rise of Big Business, the agrarian movement, Progressivism, World War 
I and its aftermath. 

166 THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1921 Mr. Shi 

An intensive study of political, social, economic, and diplomatic developments in the 
United States since 1 921 . Topics discussed include the Jazz Age, the Great Depression 
and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, McCarthyism, the Eisenhower years, 
and Viet Nam and the intellectual revolt. 

171 AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CIVILIZATION TO 1865 Mr. Shi 

The history and growth of American thought from the beginnings to the Civil War. 
Selected aspects of American Society, such as economic philosophies, religious and 
educational thought, together with tneir expression in literature and the fine arts, are 
emphasized. Not offered 1977-78. 

172 AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CIVILIZATION SINCE 1865 Mr. Shi 

The history and growth of American thought from the Civil War to the present time. 
Selected aspects of American Society, sucn as economic philosophies, religious and 
educational thought, together with their expression in literature and the fine arts, are 
emphasized. Not offered 1977-78. 

175 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY TO WORLD WAR I Mr. Shi 

The foreign relations of the United States from the winning of independence to 
intervention in World War I, with emphasis on the period from 1889 to 1919. Not 

offered 1977-78. 

176 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY SINCE WORLD WAR I Mr. Shi 

The role of the United States in the search for international order during the inter-war 
period, the diplomacy of World War II, the Cold War, and Co-existence. Not offered ■ 
1977-78. 



82 



Seminars, Tutorials, and Independent Study 

Admission to all seminars, tutorials, and independent study is by consent of the History 
Department with preference giuen to history majors. 

231 STUDIES IN THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION Mr. Patterson 

Not offered 1977-78. 

235 STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE Mr. Partin 

Not offered 1977-78. 

236 STUDIES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE Mr. Partin 

238 TWENTIETH-CENTURY RUSSIA Mr. Edmondson 

239 EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL INTEGRATION Mr. Edmondson 
Not offered 1977-78. 

251 TUDOR AND STUART ENGLAND Mr. Patterson 

260 STUDIES IN THE COLONIAL PERIOD OF AMERICAN HISTORY Mr. Lester 
Not offered 1977-78. 

261 THE MAKING OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION Mr. Lester 



272 THE ROOTS OF CURRENT RACIAL TENSIONS Mr. Spencer 

Not offered 1977-78. 

278 STUDIES IN SOUTHERN HISTORY Mr. Lester 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Directed reading and research on a special subject and the writing of a substantial paper. 
Admission by consent of the History Department. 



History 



298,299 HONORS TUTORIAL ANDTHESIS 



Staff 



The writing of an honors thesis based on primary sources, which is begun in History 401 
during the fall term, is continued in History 298 during the winter term, and is 
completed in History 299 during the spring term. The honors student does directed 
background reading and research in a tutorial and writes the thesis under the 
supervision of a member of the History Department in association with another 
member as a second reader. A departmental oral examination on the thesis and 
whatever background the supervisors may specify is also required in History 299. 
Admission by consent of the History Department. 



301 JUNIOR TUTORIAL AND ESSAY 



Staff 



For one term during the year, junior history majors will participate in a tutorial 
conducted by a member of the department who will supervise the writing of an essay 
of approximately 5,000 words. ■ 



401 SENIOR TUTORIAL AND ESSAY 



Staff 



For one term during the year, senior history majors will participate in a tutorial 
conducted by a member of the department who will supervise the writing of an essay 
of approximately 5,000 words. 




HUMANITIES 



First Year: Professors Cole (English), Labban (Classics), Polley 
(Religion), Rhodes (Religion). 
Associate Professor Kaylor (Religion). 

Assistant Professors French (Classics), Rice (History), Young (Philosophy). 
Instructor Boulton (History). 

Second Year: Professors Bliss (English), Maloney (Religion), Patterson (History), Walker (French) 
Associate Professors Abbott (English), Epes (German), Kincaid (Economics), Manning (Physics). 
Assistant Professors Edmondson (History), Ligo (Art), Maydole (Philosophy). 
Instructor Michalson (Religion). 



The Humanities Program is an interdisciplinary course which enables a student in two 
years to satisfy the following area requirements: two courses in' Section 1 of Area I, 
Language and Literature; two courses in Religion or one course each in Religion and 
Philosophy; two courses in European History and Political Science. Advanced 
placement credit in all the above courses must be forfeited by the student electing 
Humanities. 

To receive credit, the student must continue the course through six terms. Instruction 
is by general lectures and teaching aids to the entire group of students, frequent 
discussion sessions in small groups, and conferences of individual students with 
instructors. Effective communication in oral and written English is stressed. 

111-112-113 THE WESTERN TRADITION TO THE RENAISSANCE Staff 

A study of the development of Western Culture in its historical, religious, literary, 
artistic, and philosophical aspects from its origins in the Ancient Near East to the 
Renaissance. 

121-122-123 THE WESTERN TRADITION FROMTHE RENAISSANCE 
TO THE PRESENT Staff 

A study of the development of Western Culture in the modern world with particular 
emphasis upon its historical, literary, religious, political, economic, artistic, and 
philosophical aspects. Prerequisite, Humanities 111-112-113. 

200 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

(Enrollment limited to seniors with specific permission of the Second Year Humanities 
Staff). Individual work with a member of the Second Year Humanities Staff, 
independent study related to the material of the course, and participation in the 
conduct of discussions. Prerequisite, Humanities 121-122-123. 



84 



MATHEMATICS 



Professors Bernard, Jackson. 
Associate Professors Frey, King, Klein , Roberts, Stroud. 



Area Requirements: All mathematics courses and Philosophy 205 will count towards 
the fulfillment of the area requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics but note 
should be taken that course credit will be awarded for at most one mathematics 
course numbered below 25. Credit for Mathematics 25 and 26 may be obtained by 
departmental approval of a student's performance on the Advanced Placement 
Examination in Mathematics of the College Examination Board. 

Major Requirements: (1) Ten mathematics courses numbered above 99and including 
Mathematics 132, 137, 148, 138 or 142 or 143, and 151, 301, 401. Philosophy 205 or 
Education 152 may be substituted for one unspecified mathematics course. For the 
class of 1 978 the numbers 1 38 and 1 48 may be interchanged in the above statement 
if desired. 

Honors Requirements: Candidates for honors in mathematics may concentrate in either 
pure or applied mathematics. In meeting the major requirements stated above, 
honors candidates with a concentration in pure mathematics will include Mathemat- 
ics 1 38, 1 41 , 152, 163 and 165 in their programs and those with a concentration in 
applied mathematics will include Mathematics 1 38, 1 42, 1 43, 1 44, 1 63 and 1 65 in 
their programs. All honors candidates will participate in at least one seminar and will 
write an honors thesis which will be defended orally before the mathematics faculty. 

Applications for honors in mathematics should be made in writing to the Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics during the spring term of the sophomore year. 
The application will include a proposed program of study to be pursued during the 
junior and senior years. Tentative acceptance as an honors candidate will be based 
on this program and on the candidate's academic record during the freshman and 
sophomore years. Formal acceptance will be made during the spring term of the 
junior year, at which time the candidate must submit an outline of a proposed 
honors thesis. The final recommendation of the department for graduation with 
honors in mathematics will be determined by the quality of the honors thesis, the 
oral defense, and the complete academic record of the candidate. 

Graduate School: A student intending to go to graduate school in pure mathematics 
should include Mathematics 138, 141, 152, 163, 165, and a seminar in his program if 
he expects to receive an unqualified recommendation from the department. If he 
intends to do graduate work in applied mathematics, he should include 
Mathematics 138, 142, 143, 144, 163, 165, and a seminar if he expects to receive an 
unqualified recommendation from the department. He should take the Graduate 
Record Examination including the Advanced Test in Mathematics during the late fall 
of his Senior year. The language elected should be German or French. 

Certification for Secondary School Teaching: A student intending to receive state 
certification in teaching secondary school mathematics should include 
Mathematics 146 in his program. 

23 STATISTICS AND COMPUTERS Staff 

Primarily a course in probability and statistics, this course includes an introduction to 
computing, using the BASIC language, with examples drawn from various areas of 
probability and statistics. Topics covered include: probability theory, common 
frequency distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, correla- 
tion, and non-parametric statistics. This course is offered each term. Freshmen and 
Sophomores will be given preference in enrollment in the fall term. Course credit may 
be obtained for only one mathematics course numbered below Mathematics 25. 85 



Mathematics 25 CALCULUS I Staff 

An introduction to the differential calculus of elementary funt ions with applications to 
curve sketching, optimization problems, and related rates. The indefinite and definite 
integrals and introduced and applied to simple area and volume problems. 

26 CALCULUS II Staff 

A continuation of Mathematics 25 with a further development of the definite integral 
and and techniques of integration. Other topics included are infinite series, power 
series, elementary differential equations, plane vector calculus and, when time 
permits, a brief introductions to functions of two variables. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
25. 

132 LINEAR ALGEBRA Staff 

Vector spaces, linear transformation and matrices, characteristic values and vectors of 
linear transformations, bilinear and quadratic forms. Prerequisite, Mathematics 26. 

137 MULTIVARIATE CALCULUS Staff 

The differential and integral calculusoffunctionsof several variables, concluding with 
a treatment of line integrals and Green's Theorem. Prerequisite, Mathematics 26. 

138 TOPICS IN ADVANCED CALCULUS Staff 

A continuation of Mathematics 137. Included is a further development of the calculus 
of functions of several variables with emphasis on the vector integral calculus — e.g. 
Stoke's Theorem. Also included are power series, Fourier series, and an introduction 
to partial differential equations. Prerequisite, Mathematics 137. 

141 INTRODUCTION TO TOPOLOGY Mr. King 

The major emphasis will be on an introduction to general metric and topological 
spaces. Included will be the concepts of completeness, compactness, connectedness, 
and fixed point theorems. A heuristic discussion of linear graphs and classification of 
closed surfaces will be included. Prerequisite, Mathematics 137. -" 

142 ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTAL EQUATIONS Mr. Roberts 

A study of ordinary differential equations and a brief introduction to partial 
differential equations. Topics include exact equations, equations with separable 
variables, integrating factors, linear equations, Laplace transforms, Wronskians, power 
series methods, integral equations, and successive approximations. Emphasis is upon 
methods of solution, but some applications are included. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
26. 

143 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS! Mr. Roberts 

Introductory topics in numerical analysis including finite difference calculus, solution 
of equations by interation, and error analysis. The college computer facilities are used 
as a computing laboratory. Prerequisite, 142 and a working knowledge of FORTRAN or 
BASIC or permission of the instructor. Not offered 1978-79. 

144 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS II Mr. Roberts 

A continuation of Mathematics 143 including additional topics on approximation of 
functions, numerical integration, and solution of differential equations. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 143. Not offered 1978-79. 

146 GEOMETRY Mr. Stroud 

A study of Euclidean, elliptic, and hyperbolic geometries. Beginning with an axiomatic 
development of absolute geometry, the course then examines the three possible 
gg concepts of parallelism and concludes with a study of the sphere and of Poincare's 

model. Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 



148 PROBABILITY Mr. Jackson Mathematics 

A study of probability theory relative to both discrete and continuous probability laws. 
Topics include independence and dependence, mean, variance and expectation, 
random variables, jointly distributed probability laws, Chebysheff's Inequality, and a 
version of the Central Limit Theorem. Applications of probability theory are 
approached through a variety of idealized problems. Prerequisite, Mathematics 137. 

151 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA I Mr. Stroud 

An introduction to the theory of groups, rings, and fields. Topics studied include 
normal subgroups, quotient groups, homomorphisms, automorphisms, Cayley's 
theorem, permutation groups, Sylow's theorem, ideals, the field of quotients of an 
integral domain, Euclidean rings and polynominal rings. Prerequisite, Mathematics 
132. 

152 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA II Mr. Stroud 

A further study of such topics as vector spaces, dual spaces, inner product spaces, 
modules, linear transformations, characteristic roots, matrices, canonical forms, trace, 
transpose, determinants, normal transformations, and quadratic forms. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 151. 

163 REAL ANALYSIS I • Staff 

A rigorous treatment of one variable calculus including: metric spaces, sequences and 
series, continuity, differentiation, Riemann-Stieltjes integral, sequences and series of 
functions. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 37 or consent of instructor. 

165 COMPLEX ANALYSIS Mr. Klein 

The algebra and geometry of complex numbers, sequences and series of complex 
numbers, derivatives and intergrals of functions of a complex variable. The Cauchy- 
Goursat Theorem, the Cauchy Integral Formula and its consequences, Taylor series. 
Classification of singularities, the Residue Theorem, Laurent series. Harmonic 
functions, conformaT mapping and if time permits miscellaneous applications. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 137 or consent of instructor. 

201 ALGEBRA SEMINAR Staff 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

202 ANALYSIS SEMINAR Staff 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

203 TOPOLOGY SEMINAR Staff 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

204 SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR Staff 
Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

Independent study during the winter term on the history, foundations, and 
philosophy of mathematics. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

Independent study under supervision of a member of the department on topics of 
mutual interest or, with approval of the department, a 200 level seminar. 

87 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

Professor Lieutenant Colonel Ledford. 

Assistant Professor Major Collins, Major Gates, Captain Flannigan and Captain Kotula. 



Basic course students (Freshmen and Sophomores) must complete 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 1 21 , 1 22 
or 125. Advanced course students (Juniors and Seniors) must complete the require- 
ments for the Basic Course, 231 , 241 and meet additional Army requirements for com- 
missioning. Freshmen, Sophomore, Junior and Senior students will select one elective 
each year from the following areas: Effective Communications; Science Comprehension; 
Psychology; Sociology or Political Development and Political Institutions. The com- 
pletion of these requirements will prepare the student for active and reserve duty as a 
commissioned officer. 

111 MILITARY SCIENCE I (BASIC) Gates 

Mission and Organization of the Army, including the evolution of the Army ROTC Pro- 
gram; Introduction to military customs and courtesies. Leadership laboratory empha- 
sizes practical application of leadership principles and development of teamwork. Stu- 
dents have the option of taking 111 which includes one class hour each week during 
either Fall or Spring Term. A three hour leadership laboratory period per week is re- 
quired during either the Fall or Spring Term. 

112 MILITARY SCIENCE I (BASIC) Gates 

Introduction to Basic Tactics; Leadership and Management; Professional Development 
and career opportunities. One class hour each week during the Winter Term. 

121 MILITARY SCIENCE II (BASIC) Collins 

Instruction in map and aerial photography reading; Introduction to theory of small 
unit basic tactics. Leadership laboratory emphasizes characteristics of leadership, 
development of teamwork and acceptance of responsibility. Students have the option 
of taking 121 which includes two class hours each week during eitKer Fall or Spring 
Term. A three hour leadership laboratory period per week is required during either 
the Fall or Spring Term. Prerequisite: MS 1 J 1, 1 i 2 or equivalent credits. 

122 MILITARY SCIENCE II (BASIC) Collins 

A survey of American Military History from Colonial days to present. Emphasis on 
Army development and function in times of war and peace. MS 122 meets two hours 
each week during the Winter Term. Prerequisite: MS 111, 11 2 or equivalent credits. 

125 MILITARY SCIENCE I AND II (BASIC) Kotula 

A concentrated study of MS I and Ms II subjects designed to meet entry requirements 
for the advanced ROTC program. Course is offered during the summer to selected stu- 
dents who cannot otherwise quality for entry through the regular course of instruction. 
Prerequisite: Approval of the PMS. 

231 MILITARY SCIENCE 111 (ADVANCED) Kotula 

Army techniques of leadership and management; Military teaching principles; Branches 
of the Army; Small unit tactics and communications; and leadership laboratory. Four 
class hours and one laboratory period each week for one term. Course is offered all 
three terms, however leadership laboratory is offered only during Fall and Spring Terms. 
Prerequisite: Basic course or equivalent credits. 

241 MILITARY SCIENCE IV (ADVANCED) Ledford 

Defense management; Military Law; The military team; Obligations and responsibilities 
of an officer; Study of the organizational concepts of management; Advanced tactics; 
and a research project. Four class hours and one laboratory period each week for one 
term. Course offered all three terms, however, leadership laboratory is offered only dur- 
ing Fall and Spring Terms. Prerequisite: 231. 



MUSIC 



Professors Plott, Welsh. 

Associate Professor Richey. 

Instructor Lawing. 



Area Requirement: Any course, except Music 25, may be counted toward the 
fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature and the Arts. The 
department recommends 121. 

Major Requirements: 101, 102,103,104; three courses chosen from 201,202,203,204; 
301, 401; two additional courses, not including 25 and 209; and applied music (see 
paragraph 1 under Applied Music). 

Honors Requirements: The Departmental honors program encourages the attainment of 
excellence in the major and in one of the following areas: a) directed individual 
study and research; b) compositions; or c) performance. To qualify for honors in 
music a student must: 

1. Complete all requirements for a major in music and two additional major 
courses; 

2. Complete one of the following areas under the supervision of a member of the 
music staff through courses 295, 296, 297, or 301 , 401 : 

a) a significant research project, designed and conducted by the student, and 
reported in writing to the music staff; 

b) a group of original compositions, prepared for public performance, which 
demonstrates a high level of creativity and craftsmanship; 

c) three memorized public recitals in an applied area which demonstrate high 
technical and interpretive proficiencey; 

3. Receive the recommendation of the music staff. 

Completion of the above will not guarantee this recommendation. The music 
staff must be convinced of the superior quality of the student's work in all aspects 
of the program. 

25 THE PHYSICS OF MUSIC Mr. White 

Same as Physics 25. A study of the relationships between well-known esthetic 
responses to music and the physics of the sound-generating instruments, of the sound 
waves themselves, and of the sound detecting auditory mechanism. Some attention 
will be given to the unique characteristics of electronically generated music, as in the 
Moog synthesizer. The only mathematics involved is very elementary high-school 
algebra and trigonometry. Laboratory is not required, but laboratory facilities will be 
provided in which students can, on an optional noncredit basis, explore in greater 
depth some of the phenomena studied and demonstrated during the course. 

101 THEORY Mr. Welsh 

Basic musical concepts; structure and analysis of basic chords and their inversions; 
ear-training and sight-singing. 

102 THEORY Mr. Welsh 

A study of melodic and harmonic function within the four-part chorale style; 
continuing ear-training and sight-singing. Prerequisite, Music 101. 

103 THEORY Mr. Richey 

Analytical and creative study of chromaticism in one-through-four-part writing; 
continuing ear-training and sight-singing. Prerequisite, Music 102. 

104 THEORY Mr. Richey 

Advanced four-part writing with special emphasis on melodic structure in small forms; 
continuing ear-training and sight-singing. Prerequisite. Music 103. 



Music 



105 EIGHTEENTH CENTURY COUNTERPOINT 



Mr. Richey 



The writing of simultaneous melodies within a harmonic context. Prerequisite, Music 
104. 



121 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 



Mr. Lawing 




Designed for students who have had but slight contact with the art. Works of 
important masters from all periods will be studied with the aim of developing wider 
understanding of music through intelligent listening. No prerequisite. No musical 
training required. Not open to music majors. 



201 SEMINAR: ANCIENT MUSIC 



Mr. Welsh 



Pre-Christian Greek, Hebrew, and Oriental music; the music of the early Church, 
especially plainsong and organum; the growth of modal polyphony to its climax in the 
Renaissance. To be offered in even numbered years. Prerequisite, Music 101 & 
permission of the instructor. 

202 SEMINAR: BAROQUE MUSIC Mr. Welsh 

The birth and development of opera, instrumental forms and styles, and a whole new 
musical vocabulary, culminating in the works of Bach and Handel. To be offered in 
even numbered years. Prerequisite, Music 101 & permission of the instructor. 



203 SEMINAR: CLASSICAL AND ROMANTIC MUSIC 



Mr. Welsh 



The formal perfection of Haydn and Mozart; the struggle between form and content 
from Beethoven to Wagner and Brahms; the r/se of musical nationalism. To be offered 
in odd numbered years. Prerequisite, Music 101 & permission of the instructor. 



204 SEMINAR: MODERN MUSIC 



Mr. Welsh 



The search for new sounds and forms and perhaps for a new definition of music itself 
from impressionism to electronics, with emphasis on the works of Stravinsky, 
Schoenberg, Hindemith, and Bartok. To be offered in odd riumbered years. 
Prerequisite, Music 101 & permission of the instructor. 



205 CONDUCTING 



Mr. Plott 



Designed for students who plan to do both choral and instrumental conducting. 
Emphasis on techniques, rehearsal procedure, literature and stylistic practices. 
Prerequisite, Music 104. 



206 ORCHESTRATION 



Mr. Lawing 



History, technical limitations and use of modern orchestral instruments. Study of 
scores and instrumental scoring technique. Prerequisite, Music 104. 



207 COMPOSITION 



Mr. Richey 



The completion of at least one original work which uses modern musical language 
with a pre-determined small form. Performance will be arranged whenever possible. 
Prerequisite. Music 105. 



208 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 



Mr. Richey 



The completion of at least one original work which uses modern musical language 
within a pre-determined large form. Performance will be arranged whenever possible. 
Prerequisite, Music 207. 



209 SEMINAR I— PERFORMING ARTS: OPERA AND DRAMA 



Mr. Barber 



90 



Same as Drama 209. This course consists of a thorough analysis of selected operas and 
dramas with emphasis on those which have undergone transformation from one 
media to another. An integral part of the course will consist of observation of live 



performances in the area, culminating in a field trip to New York City. A fee of $250 
will be assessed class members to cover costs of performances, transportation, and 
housing and meals where applicable. Prerequisite, Music 727 and/or Drama 21 , or 
permission of the instructors. Limited to W students. Does not count toward 
fulfillment of the Music Major requirements. 



Music 



295.296.297 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MUSIC 
Music Majors or by special permission of the Director. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 



Staff 



Staff 



A special project chosen from 1) recital; 2) arrangement or transcription of a work 
originally composed for another medium; 3) a composition over and above the course 
requirement; 4) research project in historical or current problems; 5) special projects 
in conducting. 



401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Staff 



The Music Department offers to a group of its junior and senior music majors a three- 
week program of off-campus study during the spring term. The program is arranged 
yearly, usually as part of a term-long Extended Studies or Independent Study project. 



APPLIED MUSIC 



Applied Music: In addition to the above requirements all students majoring in music 
shall normally be required to take Applied Music. Each year one course credit will 
be given to a music major who takes Applied Music for the three terms of an 
academic year; during the year he may take one less regular course in one of the 
three terms. Progress in Applied Music shall be determined by performance 
examination at the end of each term with the final grade being recorded at the 
end of the year. 

Individual instruction is offered in the following branches of Applied Music: Voice — 
Donald Plott, Christine Ligo; Organ — Wilmer Welsh; Piano — David Richey, 
Barbara Tritt, Adelaide McKelway; Brass— William Lawing; Violin — Elaine Richey. 
instruction in other instruments is generally available by special arrangement with 
the Department of Music. 

A student desiring to major in music must satisfy the department as to his ability to 
carry college-level work. He must also meet, at the beginning of his sophomore 
year, a minimum piano requirement. 

Ensemble experience is provided for those who qualify for membership in Wind 
Ensemble, Male Chorus, Women's Chorus or Chamber Choir. 



APPLIED MUSIC 11, 12, 13 



Staff 



Applied Music, freshman year. Individual instruction should be arranged through the 
cnairman of the Department of Music. Credit: One course for successful completion 
of one academic year of three terms. 




APPLIED MUSIC 21, 22, 23 



Staff 



Applied Music, sophomore year. Individual instruction should be arranged through 
the Chairman of the Department of Music. Credit: One course for successful 
completion of one academic year of three terms. 



APPLIED MUSIC 31, 32, 33 



Staff 



Applied Music, junior year. Individual instruction should be arranged through the 
Cnairman of the Department of Music. Credit: One course for successful completion 
of one academic year of three terms. 



91 



Music, Philosophy 



APPLIED MUSIC 41, 42,43 



Staff 



e 
ion 



Applied Music, senior year. Individual instruction should be arranged through th 
Cnairman of the Department of Music. Credit: One course for successful completio 
of one academic year of three terms. 

APPLIED MUSIC 51, 52, 53, (non-credit). 

All non-music majors desiring either one hour or one half-hour of instruction per 
week in applied music, with the permission of the instructor, shall register for App. 51, 
52, 53. These course numbers designate terms rather than years and may be repeated 
as often as desired. While no course credit is given for App. 51,52,53agradeof Passor 
Fail will be assigned each term. Students desiring private instruction as an extended 
studies project should fill out the appropriate contract in the Music Department office 
at the beginning of the Fall term. Extended Studies credit is given only when the 
student has completed private study for three terms and has properly registered for 
Extended Studies 111 or 211 in the Spring term. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor MacCormac. 

Assistant Professors Maydole, Stell, Young. 



Area Requirements: Any course may be counted toward the fulfillment of the area re- 
quirement in Religion and Philosophy. 

Major Requirements: Nine courses in philosophy to include 100, 1 OS', 201, 202, 205, 
and two 250 seminars. Three courses in other fields related to the major and approv- 
ed by the Chairman. Majors not pursuing graduate study in philosophy may sub- 
stitute 101 for 205. All majors will take the Graduate Record Examination in 
Philosophy and 301 and 401. 

The department will designate and offer introductory courses as independent study 
sections from time to time. The prerequisite for any course may be varied by per- 
mission of the department. 



100 PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY 



Staff 



An introduction to philosophy through investigation of several main philosophical 
problems approached by intensive analysis, interpretation and critical evaluation of se- 
lected classical and modern philosophical texts. Typical examples are: Free Will, the 
Mind-Body Problems, the Problem of Induction, the Existence of God, Perception, A 
Priori Knowledge, Moral J udgments. Verification, and Metaphysics. 



101 LOGIC AND LANGUAGE 



Staff 



An introduction to classical and contemporary logic with special emphasis upon reason- 
ing and argumentation. Attention will also be given to the.rrature of language and its re- 
lation to philosophical problems. 



92 



102 ETHICS 



Mr. Young 



An analytical and historical study of ethical systems, including some consideration of 
determinism and moral responsibility, theories of purnishment, and contemporary 
metaethical theories. 



103 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Mr. MacCormac 

A philosophical examination of basic problems in classical and contemporary religious 
thought. Among topics investigated are the nature of religion, the validity of religious 
claims, the relation of faith to knowledge, arguments for existence of God, life after 
death, the problem of evil, the meaningfulness of religious language, the relation of 
religion to morality, and alternatives to theism. 

105 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY IN THE WEST Mr. MacCormac 

An historical introduction to the origins and development of philosophy with special 
emphasis on the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Epicureanism, and Neo- 
Platonism. 

106 AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY Staff 

A study of the main themes, movements and figures of American philosophy to include 
close study of major American philosophers such as Peirce, James, Royce, Dewey, 
Whitehead, Santayana, and Mead. 

» 

107 AESTHETICS Staff 

A study of the philosophy of art through a consideration of the condition and nature 
of the creation, experience, criticism of art. 

108 CHINESE PHILOSOPHY Mr. Stell 

An analysis of those philosophical traditions which shaped ancient Chinese society and 
which continue to influence contemporary social practice: Confucianism, Taoism, 
Moism, Legalism and Buddhism. Contrasts will be made with Western philosophical 
traditions in order to gain perspective on the diverging conceptions of human nature, 
the state, and society. 

109 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Mr. Stell 

The moral evaluation of the proper extent and limits of political power, and the social 
institutions through which such power is exercised. Analysis of such questions as: What 
justification is there for the government of some men by others? What is the proper ex- 
tent of government control over the individual? What duties do citizens have? Analysis 
of such concepts as freedom, rights, justice and equality. 

no EXISTENTIALISM Mr. Maydole 

A study of the literary and philosophical works of Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Sartre, Camus, and other prominent existentialist writers. 

m PHILOSOPHY OF LAW Mr. Stell 

An analysis of the nature and function- of law. An examination of various theories of 
the law and the relation of law to morality. An assessment of the principles of legal 
reasoning and jurisprudence with attention to decided cases. 

201 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY IN THE WEST Mr. MacCormac 

A study of the rise and development of Medieval philosophy with special emphasis on 
such major figures as Augustine, Aquinas, Duns Scotus and Ockham in primary and 
secondary texts. Prerequisite: Piiilosopliy 105 or permission of the instructor. 

202 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY IN THE WEST Mr. MacCormac 

A consideration of the emergence of modern philosophy from its classical background 
with special emphasis on epistemological and ontological issues in the thought of several 
major figures from the Rationalists, the Empiricists, Kant and their successors. Pre- 
requisite, any pfiilosopiiy course or permission of tlie instructor. 



Philosophy 



93 



Philosophy 



20 



TWENTIETH CENTURY ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY 



Mr. Young 

The main emphasis will be on Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, and the Logical Positivists. 
An attempt will be made to evaluate the claim of many contemporary philosophers that 
a careful analysis of language will enable us either to solve or dissolve the traditional 
problems of philosophy. Prerequisite, any philosophy course or permission of the in- 
structor. 



205 SYMBOLIC LOGIC Mr. Maydole 

A study of the nature of formal systems including the development of a prepositional 
calculus, first-order predicate calculus, recursive functions, the Godel theorems of 1931 , 
as well as selected issues in the philosophy and foundations of mathematics and logics. 
Prerequisite: previous worl^ in philosophy or mathematics. Interested students must 
consult with the instructor. 

206 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Mr. Maydole 

An investigation of: (1) the nature of scientific knowledge and how it is acquired, ex- 
pressed and justified; (2) the philosophical presuppositions of the natural, social and 
life sciences; and (3) the relationship between science, technology and human values. 
Prerequisite: any philosophy course or permission of the instructor. 



250 SEMINAR 



Staff 



Advanced analysis of topics in philosophy. Among seminar topics offered in recent 
years have been the philosophy of Whitehead, Aesthetics, Marxism, the philosophy of 
Cassirer, American Philosophy, Science and Religion, Order in Society, Phenomenology, 
and Causality. Prerequisite, two courses in philosophy including at least one 200 level 
course. 

295 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 

Advanced independent study on selected topics in philosophy. Permission of the Chair- 
man required. ^ 



301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 



Staff 



A special philosophical study under an assigned faculty supervisor. Topic to be approved 
by the Chairman. 



401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Staff 



A special philosophical study under an assigned faculty supervisor. Topic to be approved 
by the Chairman. A comprehensive examination by the department will also be required. 



94 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Cartmill. 
Staff members. 



Graduation requirement: Two team activities and three individual activities. 

Each student will be given opportunities within the limits of Davidson's staff and 
facilities to define for himself or herself a physical education and recreation 
program in keeping with the stated requirements. Astudent will be excused from 
the program for medical reasons unless he or she requests individual instruction 
in some activity. Team sports include flickerball, soccer, basketball, volleyball, and 
Softball. Individual and dual sports include gymnastics, beginning and in- 
termediate swimming, senior life saving, water safety instruction. Red Cross first 
aid, ballet, modern and tap dance, weight training, canoeing, scuba diving, 
sailing, water skiing, fencing, ^andball, golf, bowling, snow skiing, ice skating, 
squash, paddle ball, tennis, jogging, archery, physical conditioning, karate, 
backpacking, rappelling, marksmanship, and cycling. 



PHYSICS 

Professors Hopkins, White. 
Associate Professors Frey, Manning, Wolf. 



Area Requirement: Any course in physics may be counted toward the fulfillment of 
the area requirement in Natural Science and Mathematics. Physics 23 and 25 are 
designed to accommodate students who want a balanced, one-term treatment of 
the subject. 

Major Requirements: Physics 121, 126, 131, 142, one other physics course numbered 
134 or higher, two courses in chemistry (preferably Chemistry 31, 41), Physics 301 
and Physics 401. (In addition to these courses a student planning a career in 
physics should also take at least Physics 143, 145, and 146; and mathematics courses 
beyond those listed as requisites. He should also acquire a reading knowledge of 
one or more of German, Russian and French.) A Freshman considering a major in 
physics or a program in engineering should consult some member of the physics 
staff before he registers for the fall term. The sequence of courses is so tightly 
structured that he will have extra difficulties if he fails to take the prerequisite 
courses at the normal times. In particular, he should be sure to take Mathematics 
25 during the fall term and Physics 35 no later than the winter term. 



23 ASTRONOMY AND SPACE PHYSICS 



Mr. Manning 



A study of the universe, beginning with an examination of the earth. Stresses the 
techniques used by astronomers to build coherent and consistent models. 
Includes discussion of extraterrestrial life, pulsars and quasars, and modern 
cosmology. Primarily for non-science majors; no physics or mathematics beyond 
algebra and trigonometry required. Not open to seniors. 



95 



Physics 



96 



25 THE PHYSICS OF MUSIC Mr. White 

Same as Music 25. A study of the relationships between well-known esthetic 
responses to music and the physics of the sound-generating instruments, of the 
sound waves themselves, and of the sound-detecting auditory mechanism. Some 
attention will be given to the unique characteristics of electronically generated 
music, as in the Moog synthesizer. Laboratory is not required, but laboratory 
facilities will be provided in which students can, on an optional, noncredit basis, 
explore in greater depth some of the phenomena studied and demonstrated 
during the course. 

35,36 GENERAL PHYSICS Staff 

,An introduction to mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and 
modern physics. One laboratory period each week. Prerequisite, Mathematics 25. 



121 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS Mr. Hopkins 

Lecture and laboratory work related to modern developments in physics. Topics 
included are: atomic view of matter, electricity, radiation and atomic models, 
relativity, x-rays, radioactivity, waves and corpuscles, nuclear processes, and 
fundamental processes. One laboratory period each week. Prerequisite, Physics 
36 or permission of instructor. 

123 HEALTH PHYSICS I Mr. Hopkins 

A study of the protection of individuals and populations from harmful effects of 
ionizing radiation such as x-rays, gamma rays, and nuclear particles. It is a practical 
and useful course which can be elected by pre-medical or pre-dental students as a 
part of their major requirements. Topics to be treated are atomic and nuclear 
properties of matter, the interaction of radiation with matter, radiation 
measurements, biological effects of radiation, and protection guides. One 
laboratory period each week. Prerequisite^ Physics 36. 

126 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM f^r. Manning 

A study of electrostatics and magnetostatics, including the derivation and use of 
Maxwell's equations. Applications to AC and DC circuitry are stressed. 
Prerequisite: P/iysics 36. Corequisite: Mattiematics 137. 



131 INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS Mr. Prey 

A study of kinematics, dynamics of particles, central forces and planetary motion, 
linear harmonic oscillators, energy, momentum, and mechanics of extended 
bodies. Simple vector treatment is used. Prerequisite, Physics 126or permission of 
the instructor. 

134 STATISTICAL AND THERMAL PHYSICS Mr. Wolf 

A study of the forms in which energy exists in physical systems and of the 
limitations on its conversion from one form to another. The approach is primarily 
statistical, and the conclusions of classical thermodynamics are deduced from 
statistical results. Prerequisite, Physics 737 or permission of the instructor. Offered 
in alternate years. Not offered in 1978-79. 

135 ELECTRONICS Mr. White 

An introduction to instrumental electronics, with major emphasis on the uses of 
integrated-circuit components, both linear (mainly operational amplifiers) and 
nonlinear (logic gates, flip-flops, counters, etc.). Each student may devote the last 
four laboratory periods, if he wishes, to a project involving the design and 
breadboard assembly of some useful electronic instrument. One laboratory 
period each week. Prerequisite. Physics 36. 



138 HEALTH PHYSICS II Mr. Frey Physics 

A continuation of Physics 123 with emphasis on the theory of detection 
instruments, external and internal protection, reactor criticality and safety, 
evaluation of protective measures, and waste disposal. Prerequisite, Physics 121 
and 123. Not offered 1977-78. 

142 QUANTUM MECHANICS I Mr. White 

An introductory course in quantum mechanics with applications to simple 
systems. Prerequisite, Physics 131, or Chemistry 122 and permission of the 
instructor. 

143 QUANTUM MECHANICS II Mr. Wolf 

A continuation of Physics 142 including perturbation theory and applications to 
atomic, molecular, solid-state, and nuclear physics. Prerequisite, Physics 142. 
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in T 979-80. 

145 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY Mr. Frey 

A study of electromagnetic fields and waves, dealing with Maxwell's field 
equations and their consequences in electromagnetic radiation and optical 
phenomena. Prerequisite, Physics 126. Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 
1978-79. 

146 ADVANCED MECHANICS Mr. Wolf 

Theoretical approach to the motion of particles and rigid bodies, employing 
vector algebra, linear transformations, and Lagrange's ana Hamilton's equations. 
Prerequisite, Physics 131. Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1977-78. 

202 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSICS Staff 

Open to qualified students, v^'ith permission of the instructor. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY Staff 

Open to qualified students, with permission of the instructor. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

All junior physics majors must complete an approved series of projects in 
experimental physics during the spring term and attend the departmental 
seminar. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

All senior physics majors must (a) pass a comprehensive examination covering the 
courses required for the major, (b) attend and present programs at the 
departmental seminar, and (c) complete an approved project in experimental 
physics or complete an independent study in theoretical physics. A written 
Extended Study proposal should be prepared in consultation with a member of 
the department early in the winter term. 



97 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors Minter, Proctor. 

Assistant Professors Devon, Linden, Retzer. 

Area Requirement: Any course numbered below 200 may be counted toward the ful- 
fillment of the area requirement in Social Science. 

Major Requirements: Eleven courses in Political Science, including: 

(a) at least one course in each of the following areas: 

1. Political Theory (Political Science 110-115) 

2. American Politics (Political Science 121-135) 

3. Comparative Politics (Political Science 140-158) 

4. international Politics (Political Science 165-175) 

(b) at least one seminar (Political Science 210-270) 

(c) Political Science 301 and 401. 

Honors Requirements: A student who wishes to work for honors will develop an 
individual program in consultation with the chairman of the department. It must 
include two or more tutorials in the junior year, at least two seminars, and the 
preparation of a thesis during two terms of the senior year. 

110 HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT Mr. Minter 

Analytical study of major political theorists from Plato to the modern era. 

115 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES Mr. Proctor 

Attention will be given to liberal democracy, communism, anarchism, socialism, 
conservatism, fascism. Black Power, and the New Left. 

121 CONGRESS ANDTHE PRESIDENCY Mr. Retzer 

A focus on Congress as a policy making institution and its rejationship to the 
Presidency. 

123 THE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCESS Mr. Minter 

The administrative process in public bureaucracies, including its structural and 
institutional characteristics, behavioral patterns and policy outputs. 

125 PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS Mr. Retzer 

An analysis of the internal operations of parties and interest groups and their role in 
the American electoral and legislative processes. 

127 URBAN POLITICS Mr. Retzer 

An investigation into the making of public policy in metropolitan areas. 

129 PUBLIC OPINION AND IDEOLOGY FORMATION Mr. Retzer 

A study of the formation, change, and measurement of political attitudes. Not open to 
freshmen except with permission of instructor. 

135 CONSTITUTIONAL LAW Mr. Minter 

The development and interpretation of the Constitution of the United States through 
analysis of the decisions of the Supreme Court. 

140 DEMOCRATIC POLITICAL SYSTEMS Mr. Minter 

The theory and practice of American, West European, and other selected political 
98 systems. 



145 SOVIET AND EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS Mr. Linden Political Science 

A survey of the origin, development, and current status of communism in the Soviet 
Union and selected East European states. 

146 CHINESE POLITICS 

Background and dynamics of Chinese communism in the context of modernization, 
internal competition, and new patterns of foreign relations. 

150 POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION Mrs. Devon 

A cross-cultural study of the institutions and processes of political learning that 
prepare individuals for life in the polity. 

155 POLITICAL DEVELOPMENT Mr. Proctor 

Problems of political modernization in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle 
East. 

156 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

A study of the governmental systems and current political development in the nations 
of South Asia. 

158 AFRICAN POLITICAL SYSTEMS Mr. Proctor 

A comparative study of the government and politics of the new states of sub-Saharan 
Africa. 

165 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Mr. Linden 

Structures and processes of conflict and cooperation in a rapidly changing world 
environment. 

167 INTERNATIONAL LAW AND ORGANIZATION Mr. Linden 

The nature and role of international law, and the operations of the United Nations and 
selected regional and functional organizations. 

170 INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

The relations between India, Pakistan, Ceylon and the Himalayan kingdoms. The 
relations of these South Asian nations with China, U.S.S.R. and the Western Powers. 

172 FOREIGN POLICIES OF AFRICAN STATES Mr. Proctor 

The relations of African states with each other and with the Great Powers. 

175 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY Mr. Linden 

Major issues in recent diplomacy, organization and conduct of foreign relations, and 
future challenges and prospects. 

SEMINARS 

Reading, research papers and discussion in the area of each seminar. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. 

210 SEMINAR IN POLITICALTHEORY Mr. Minter 

215 SEMINAR IN THE SCOPE AND METHODS OF 
POLITICAL SCIENCE Mrs. Devon 

230 SEMINAR IN AMERICAN POLITICS Mr. Retzer 

250 SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS Mr. Proctor 99 



Political Science, 
Premedical 



270 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Mr. Linder 

290 TUTORIAL IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Staff 

Individual programs of supervised study in selected areas of Political Science. 

295 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Staff 

Research leading to the submission of a major paper. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

An extensive reading program leading to an oral examination conducted by two 
faculty members. 



401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Staff 



1) Preparation of a substantial research paper normally involving the use of primary 
sources, or 1) engaging in a practical political experience, such as working in a 
governmental office or participating in a political campaign, and writing a report 
which relates this experience to issues raised in the professional literature. A 
satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examination in Political Science is also 
required. 



PREMEDICAL 



Professor Fredericksen, Chairman. 



100 



The premedical major consists of Biology 31, 32, Chemistry 31, 41, 101, 102, 
Mathematics 25, Physics 35, 36, Premedicine 301, 401, and four additional 101-199 
courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Premedical majors are encouraged to 
complete most of their major requirements by the end of their junior year, to use their 
curricular flexibility to study in some areaof tne sciences or humanities in depth, and 
to plan toward group or independent study in their senior year. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 

A course of research, specialized study, or field application. Required of major 
students in the junior year. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 

A course of research, specialized study, or field application. Required of major 
students in the senior year. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Professors Burts, Kelton, Ostwalt. 

Assistant Professors Kello, Palmer. 

Adjunct Professor Bachelder. 



Area Requirement: Psychology 101, 102, 132, 141, 154 are courses which may be 
counted toward fulfillment of the area requirement in Social Science. 

Note on Prerequisites: Occasionally, under extraordinary circumstances, the 
department may waive a specific prerequisite for a particular course. Consultation 
with the instructor is prerequisite to registration for an l-section of a regular 
course. Independent study (I) sections of regular courses are listed in the time 
schedule for each particular term. 

Major Requirements: Psychology 101, 102, 111, 112, 301, 401, and four additional 
courses in psychology, at least one of which must be at the 200 level. 

Honors Requirements: The departmental honors program encourages the attainment 
of excellence through directed individual study and research. To qualify for 
"Honors in Psychology" a student must: 

1. complete twelve courses in psychology including: 

a) 101, 102, 111, 112 and two additional 100-level courses, 

b) 301 and 401. 

c) 299 (senior thesis) and three other 200-level courses; and 

2. receive the recommendation of the department. 

Completion of the courses listed above will not guarantee this recommendation. 
The student's work must convince the psychology staff that his work is of a 
superior quality. Evidence for such superior quality may consist of generally high 
degrees of proficiency or exceptional creativity in papers and projects. 

101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

A survey of the current psychology of learning, perception, motivation, intelligence, 
and thinking, with emphasis on the application of scientific method to psychological 
investigation and on tne biological bases of behavior and experience. 

102 INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY Staff 

A continuation of the study of behavior and experience with emphasis on the 
individual as a whole; psychoanalytic, behavioral, and phenomenological approaches 
to the study of man are presented and evaluated. Prerequisite, Psychology 707. 

111 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-SENSATION 

AND PERCEPTION Staff 

A study of research methodology and findings in the fields of Sensation and 
Perception. Principles of experimental design, including analysis of variance and 
factorial design are dealt with in class and laboratory. Prerequisite: Psycho/ogy 101, 
Mathematics 23. 

112 PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH-LEARNING 

AND MOTIVATION Staff 

Research methodology and findings in the fields of Learning and Motivation are dealt 
with in class and laboratory. The study of experimental design is continued. 
Prerequisite: Psyc/io/ogy 111. 101 



Psychology 131 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

A study of the symptoms, causes, and treatment or care of persons suffering from 
neuroses, psychoses, behavior disorders, and mental deficiencies. Particular emphasis 
is placed on the role of learning in both etiology and therapy. Several field trips to 
mental hospitals. Prerequisites, Psychology 707 and 102. 

132 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Palmer 

A study of social influence on individual behavior. Topics covered include 
socialization, models of attitude change, social perception, communication processes i 
and persuasion, group norms and roles. An emphasis is placed on individual research by 
the student. Prerequisites, Psyctiology 701 and 1 02 or consent of tiie instructor. 

141 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Ostwalt 

Same as Education 141. Individual development from infancy through adolescence, 
with emphasis on physical and motor, mental and language, emotional and social 
development. Includes special study of psychoanalytic, cognitive, and behavioral 
theories of development. Prerequisite, Psychology 101. 

146 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT Mr. Kelton 

Same as Education 146. Elementary treatment of the history, theory, and techniques of 
psychological measurement. Attention is given to the measurement of intelligence, 
academic achievement, personality, interests, differential and special aptitudes. 
Includes limited experience in test administration and interpretation. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 101. 

154 BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY Mr. Burts 

Selection of personnel, training, efficiency, and human relations. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 101. 

161 SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY ^ Mr. Kelton 

An introduction to the development of contemporary psychological theory. Includes 
the historical development of Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Gestalt 
Psychology, and Psychoanalysis. Prerequisites, Psychology 101 and one additional 
course in psychology. 

167 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY ■ Mr. Kello 

A survey of the role of the nervous system in behavior and experience. Topics covered 
include basic structure and function of the nervous system, sensory and motor mechan- 
isms, physiological bases of motivation and emotion, sleep and arousal, and physiolog- 
ical bases of learning, memory, and language. Prerequisite, permission of instructor bas- 
ed upon reasonable background in psyciiology or bioiogy. Relevant courses include 
Psy 101,m,112,and Biology 31,32. 

202 SEMINAR ON PERSONALITY Staff 

A critical study of the major theories of the development, organization, and dynamics 
of personality, with emphasis on the recent literature. The course is designed primarily 
for majors in psychology in their senior year. Prerequisites, Psychology 101, 102, 131, 
132, and consent of the instructor. 

212-220 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Topics announced in advance of registration. Prerequisite, Psychology 111 , 112 and 
consent of instructor. 

231 ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY Staff 

Weekly visits to a mental hospital with provision of continued interaction with 
1 02 patients, observation of various activities of staff members, participation in therapeutic 



programs. Systematic study of a special topic in psychopathology or psychotherapy Psychology 

Written reports, including a term paper on a topic related to the problems and 
activities of a mental hospital. Prerequisite, Psychology 131 and consent of instructor. 

Each summer the department offers a modification of Psychology 131 and 
Psychology 231 during an eight-week period, with the students living and working at 
the state mental hospital in Morganton, N. C. There the students come into direct 
personal relationships with patients and staff members while studying with one of our 
faculty members. Credit tor Psychology 131 and 231. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 , 102, 
and consent of instructor. Inquiries may be directed to Davidson-Broughton Summer 
Psychology Program, Davidson College. 

241 ADVANCED STUDY IN CHILDREN'S BEHAVIOR Mr. Ostwalt 

Based upon independent study conducted with the children at Western Carolina 
Center in Morganton, N. C^^ Involves intensive reading and research on a specific 
problem related to the program at WCC, work with the young people there in a variety 
of activities, and the keepingof a journal on the work done. Each student is required to 
spend 10 days of approximately eight hours each at the center during the term, one 
day each week for ten weeks. Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

251 TUTORIAL Staff 

Intensive readings in a specific area; periodic conferences with supervisor and staff; 
written report, one copy of which shall be the property of the department. Open 
ordinarily only to advanced majors in psychology. Prerequisite, permission of a staff 
member as supervisor and consent of staff; formal, written application in advance of 
registration: tne application must state the delimited area in which the student plans to 
work, must include the beginnings of a bibliography, and must present evidence of 
sufficient background knowledge to assure readiness for the undertaking. 

252 TUTORIAL 

253 TUTORIAL 

299 SENIOR THESIS Staff 

An experimental study, designed and conducted by the student, supervised by a 
member of the staff, and reported in writing according to the form approved in the 
Publications Manual of the American Psychological Association. Periodic conferences 
with supervisor and staff. Prerequisites, formal presentation of a planned research 
program, permission of a staff member as supervisor, and consent of staff. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 

The requirements for Psychology 301 are: (a) Selection, in consultation with a member 
of the Departmental Faculty, of a topic to be studied; (b) Development of a 
bibliography in the area; (c) Study and reading on the chosen topic. Although not 
required, field work and/or data collection might be a part of the study process, (d) A 
paper written in "publication" form, an original and two copies duly presented to the 
department for evaluation. The original willbe kept and filed by the department. The 
two copies will be returned to the author for his own use. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 

All seniors must register for Psychology 401 in the fall or winter term. Weekly review 
sessions are held to guide students in reading and study. A reading log is required of 
each student. Credit for Psychology 401 is given when the comprehensive examination 
is passed. The comprehensive examination consists of three parts: (a) The Undergrad- 
uate Record Examination published by the Educational Testing Service, (b) An Essay 
Examination prepared by the department, (c) Conference with an outside examiner. 



103 



RELIGION 



Professors Maloney, Polley, Rhodes. 

Associate Professors Clark, Kaylor,* McKelway. 

Instructor Michalson. 



Area Requirements for Religion and Philosophy: Three courses, at least two in 
religion. This requirement may be fulfilled in either of two ways: (a) Two courses 
in religion plus either one additional course in religion or a course in philosophy; 
(b) Humanities 111-11 2-113, 121-122-123 plus one course in religion or a course in 
philosophy. (Courses below the 100 level do not meet area requirements.) 

Major Requirements: Eleven courses in religion, including at least two seminars and 
301 and 401. The successful completion of the two year Humanities program may 
count as two courses on the major. (Courses below the 100 level do not meet 
major requirements.) 

IHonors Requirements: Eleven courses in religion including at least two seminars and 
301 and 401. A senior honors tutorial with thesis and oral examination. (Courses 
below the 100 level do not meet honors requirements.) 

11, 12 ELEMENTARY HEBREW Mr. Polley 

A study of the principles and structure of the Hebrew language, with translation of 
selected Old Testament passages. Credit: two courses. Offered by request. 

101 INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION Mr. Michalson 

An introduction to the nature of the religious life. Emphasis will be placed on the 
distinctive character of religious experiences, attitudes, and expressions. Reference 
will be made to both Eastern and Western religious traditions. A course for freshmen 
and sophomores. 

102 FAITH OF ISRAEL Mr. Clark, Mr. Polley 

A study of the foundation of the Judaeo-Christian tradition through an examination of 
the faith of ancient Israel as expressed in Old Testament and intertesiament literature. 
Not open to students electing Humanities 111-112-113, 121-122-123. A course for 
freshmen and sophomores. 

103 NEW TESTAMENT FAITH Mr. Clark, Mr. Kaylor, Mr. Michalson 

A study of the faith of the New Testament community as it is expressed in the Gospels, 
Acts, and selected Epistles. Not open to students electing Humanities 11 1-1 12-1 12, 121- 
122-123. A course for freshmen and sophomores. 

104 HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT Mr. Rhodes 

An historical study of selected movements, men, and ideas that have contributed 
significantly to the development of the Christian tradition since the second century. 
Not open to students electing Religion 705 or hlumanities 111-112-113, 121-122-123. 

105 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY Mr. McKelway 

A study of methods, concepts, and problems of theology, including a survey of basic 
doctrines as taught by major figures in the history of Cnristian thought. Not open to 
students electing Religion 104. 

106 CHRISTIAN ETHICS Mr. Maloney 

An analytical study of the principles, history and current state of Christian ethical 
1 04 thought with special focus upon such selecteu contemporary problems as bio-medical 

ethics, ecology, politics, race and sex. 

*0n leave, 1977-78. 



122 THE HEBREW PROPHETS Mr. Poliey Religion 

A study of the prophetic literature of the Old Testament in the setting of political and 
social conditions of the times. 

129 BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY Mr. Poliey 

A study of the contributions of archaeological research to an understanding of the 
historical, religious, and cultural background of the Bible. Some attention will be given 
to a survey of the origin, development and techniques of archaeology in the Ancient 
Near East. 

131 THE LIFE AND TEACHING OF JESUS Mr. Kaylor 

An advanced study of the life and teaching of Jesus as presented in the Synoptic 
Gospels and in subsequent I'tterature. Recommended background: Hunnanitiesn2 or 
Religion 103. 

132 THE THEOLOGY OF PAUL Mr. Kaylor 

A study of Pauline thought as presented in the New Testament and in subsequent 
literature. 

142 THEOLOGY OF THE REFORMATION Mr. McKelway 

A study of the Reformation and Post-Reformation period with special emphasis on the 
lives and teachings of Martin Luther and John Calvin. 

143 MODERN THEOLOGY Mr. McKelway 

The development of modern theology from 1800 in the writings of Schleiermacher, 
Feuerbach, RitschI, Kierkegaard, Barth, Bultmann, Tillich, and others, including such 
contemporary issues as existentialism. Christian anthropology, secularism, and the 
"death of God" movement. Not open to freshmen. 

144 AMERICAN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT Mr. Rhodes 

An historical study of selected movements, men, and ideas that have contributed 
significantly to the formation of the American religious tradition. 

145 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND RELIGIOUS THOUGHT Mr. Rhodes 

Same as English 145. A study of the religious thought of major American writers from 
the 17th century to the present. Emphasis on Edwards, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, 
and Faulkner. An interdisciplinary course with Mr. Abbott. 

146 CHRISTIAN CLASSICS Mr. McKelway 

Selected readings from the Early Church to the Modern Period of major works of 
Christian literature which reflect the meaning and interpretation of faith. Notopen to 
freshmen. 

147 RELIGIOUS RESPONSES TO HISTORY Mr. Michalson 

A study of various attempts to determine the religious meaning, purpose, and goal of 
history. Representative thinkers will include Augustine, Kierkegaard, Bultmann, and 
Tillich. Open to all classes, but freshmen require consent of the instructor. 

149 THEOLOGY AND LITERATURE Mr. McKelway 

Same as English 149. The discovery and critical discussion of theological implications in 
selected Twentieth Century fiction, drama, and poetry. An interdisciplinary course 
with Mr. Bliss. 

151 BIBLICAL ETHICS Mr. Maloney 

A study of selected aspects of Hebrew, Judaic and early Christian ethical thought 105 

viewed in comparison with ethical concepts of ancient non-biblical cultures. 



Religion 152 WAR AND CONSCIENCE Mr. Maloney 

A study of attitudes toward war in the western tradition with emphasis upon the 
concepts of holy war, just war, and pacifism. The causes of war, the significance of 
nuclear weapons, and the meaning of responsible citizenship will also be considered. 

161 CONTEMPORARY RELIGIONS IN THE UNITED STATES Mr. Polley 

A study of the beliefs and practices of Judaism, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, 
with attention to the historical and sociological factors shaping religious pluralism in 
American society. 

163 CHRISTIANITY AND ART Mr. Clark 

A study of selected religious themes as depicted in painting, sculpture and 
architecture from ancient to modern times. 

172 COMPARATIVE RELIGION: THE RELIGIONS OF SOUTH ASIA 

Mr. Kaylor, Mr. Michalson 

A critical study of the chief religions of ancient and modern India: Hinduism, 
Buddhism, Islam, Zoroastrianism (Parseeism), Jainism, and Sikhism. Some attempt will 
be made to assess their social significance. 

173 HINDUISM ' Mr. Kaylor 

A study oftheoriginand development of the Hindu tradition. Attention will be given 
to the ancient sources of the Hindu tradition, its use of myth and ritual, its responses to 
encounters with Islam and Christianity, and its modern expressions. 

174 BUDDHISM Mr. Michalson 

An introduction to the origins and development of Buddhist thought and practice. 
The life of Gautama Buddha, the emergence of Buddhist sects, and the spread of 
Buddhism throughout East Asia will be surveyed. 

SEMINARS, TUTORIALS, AND HONORS ^ 

Only seminars offered in 1977-78 are listed. Preference given to religion majors. 

221 to 229 SEMINARS IN OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES 

231 to 239 SEMINARS IN NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES 

241 to 249 SEMINARS IN THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

245 THE THOUGHT OF JONATHAN EDWARDS Mr. Rhodes 

A study of representative works that reveal Edwards' philosophy and 
theology. 

251 to 259 SEMINARS IN ETHICAL STUDIES 

254 THE SERMON ON THE MOUNT Mr. Maloney 

An intensive study of the Sermon on the Mount and related teachings of 
Jesus. 

261 to 269 SEMINARS IN RELIGION AND ART 

271 to 279 SEMINARS IN COMPARATIVE RELIGION 



295 INDEPENDENT STUDY 
106 299 SENIOR HONORS TUTORIAL AND THESIS 



301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS 

A reading program. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS 



Staff 



Staff 



Religion 



In consultation with the department a research project or a reading program 
culminating in a comprehensive examination covering the biblical field, Christian 
ethics and theology. 




107 



SOCIOLOGY 



Assistant Professors Koller, Ruth. 

Area Requirements: All courses in Sociology except 116, 125, 201, 301, 401 may be 
counted toward fulfillnrent of the area requirements for Social Sciences. 
However, Freshmen are encouraged to take 101, 102, 103, 112 rather than the 
more advanced courses. 

Major Requirements: Ten courses in Sociology which must include 101 , 125 (formerly 
105), 201 , 301 , 401 all of which must be taken while in residence on the David- 
son campus. Any other four courses may be taken to fulfill the major require- 
ments. All majors will be required to take the Graduate Records Examination as 
part of the Sociology 201 course. 

Majors who plan to attend graduate school in Sociology are strongly advised to 
take Sociology 116 and either Economics 104 (Statistics) or Mathematics 23 
(Statistics and Computers), if they expect to be eligible to receive an unquali- 
fied recommendation from the Sociology Department. 

101 INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY Staff 

An introduction to the scientific study of human society. The nature and meaning of 
culture, socialization, personality, social systems and social interaction. 

102 SOCIAL DEVIANCE Staff 

A study of deviance in the modern world in the framework of the interactionist 
theories. Topics include drug addiction, alcoholism, sexual deviance and suicide. 

Not offered 1977-78. 

103 SOCIAL PROBLEMS Staff 

A course designed to help understand the extent and effects of poverty on different 
categories of the population; past and present attempts to alleviate the problems and 
some suggested reforms. 

104 SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL Mr. Koller 

An introduction to the study of the fundamental processes of social interaction. The 
course focuses on the individual and his beliefs, values, attitudes and socialization as 
well as inter-personal influence and the expectations of significant other persons in 
the social environment. 

108 PEOPLES OF LATIN AMERICA 

A survey of the tribal and peasant peoples of Central and South America. Varieties of 
adaptation to environments, social organization, and cultural change will be 
examined in comparative perspective, and intensive study of selected groups will be 
made. 

109 PENOLOGY ANDCRIMINALjUSTICE Mr. Ruth 

A study in corrections focusing upon penology and criminal justice. The program 
includes a preterm orientation period (the final two weeks of the winter term), outside 
lectures and briefings with speakers from corrections and law enforcement 
administration, field trips to Central Prison and Morganton correctional facility, and a 
10 week on-site field experience with officers and inmates at an area correctional unit. 
Same as Extended Studies 102. 

110 HUMAN PREHISTORY 

A survey of the origins and development of man and culture, from the perspectives of 
1 08 physical anthropology and archaeology. 



111 INDIANS OF THE AMERICAS Sociology 

A survey of American Indian cultures. Origins, distribution, social, organization, and 
adaptation to environments will be discussed, and intensive study of selected groups 
will be made. 

112 SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY Staff 

An introduction to the comparative study of simple and complex societies. Topics 
includes processes of kinship organization, social control, adaptation, and ritual 
practices. 

113 MINORITY GROUP PROBLEMS Mr. Ruth 

An exploration of minority group problems derived from the American data and from 
selected examples of other multi-ethnic nations. The course will focus upon problems 
arising in the political and social milieu. Selected topics include, among others, the 
origins of minority group problems, consequences of stratification, and techniques for 
reducing tensions and improving human relations. 

114 RACE RELATIONS Staff 

An introduction to race relations in this country with special emphasis on Black- White 
relations. Historical background of current beliefs and practices, information 
concerning biological, cultural, and social conditions. Not offered 1977-78. 

115 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY Mr. Koller 

A review of the family in various cultures and times; courtship, marriage and family 
adjustments in modern America. 

116 INTRODUCTION TO METHODS IN SOCIAL RESEARCH Mr. Koller 

Techniques in sociological research: elements in scientific logic, problem formation, 
research design and methods of data collection. Special emphasis on the analysis and 
interpretation of data.* 

120 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION Mr. Koller 

An analysis of the social concomitants of religious belief and practice. Theoretical and 
comparative theories of religion and the related body of sociological research will be 
considered. 

121 URBAN SOCIOLOGY Mr. Ruth 

The citv as a social phenomenon in the modern world, focusing upon urbanism as a 
way of^ life. Special emphasis upon the analysis of urban trends, characteristics, 
functions, social orgainzation, problems, urban renewal, and planning. The course 
will provide an opportunity for an introduction to the implementation of urban 
studies in the field. Not offered 1977-78. 

122 POPULATION PROBLEMS Staff 

Dynamics of population growth and change as influenced by births, deaths and 
migrations. Introduction to demographic terms and measures. Problems of over- 
population and programs which are being instituted to slow population growth.* /Vor 
offered 1977-78. 

123 COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR Staff 

An examination of the dynamics of human interaction in grouping and under 
conditions less structured than institutions, such as con tag ion, fads, societal crises, and 
social movements. The course also examines conditions where these a re more likely to 
emerge. Not o/'ferec/ 1977-78. 

* Recommended only for studentswhohave had Sociology 101 or those with junior or 

senior standing. 109 



Sociology 124 SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION Mr. Ruth 

The course will go beyond a structural-functional inquiry to apply a system analysis to 
the world educational crisis, with special attention paid to England, Africa, and the 
United States. On the American scene, specific educational crises and conflicts will be 
examined in depth. In conjunction witn the preceding, the policy ramifications of 
government aid to American higher education will be considered. Not offered 1977- 
78. 

125 SOCIAL THEORY AND SOCIAL CHANGE Mr. Ruth 

An introduction to sociological theory and the relationship of theory to the analysis of 
social and cultural change. Special emphasis upon issues of social cohesion and 
continuity in contemporary societies as related to modernization, technology and life 
styles. 

131 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY Staff 

A study of causes of delinquency and trends in delinquent behavior. Methods of 
prevention and control of delinquency. A survey of the theory and practices of 
juvenile control systems. Not offered T 977-78. 

135 THE SOCIOLOGY OF SCIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE Mr. Koller 

The study of the role of social and political influences on the development of 
knowledge. How science has influenced education, values, political decisions, ways of 
looking at the world and, in turn, how society influences the development of science 
itself. Not offered 7977-78. 

139 SOCIOLOGICAL CRIMINOLOGY Mr. Ruth 

An analysis of the social construction of crime as legal categories, perspectives on 
causation, and the consequences of variable social reactions to crime. The course also 
examines research pertaining to crime and crime statistics, and modern trends in crim- 
inal law, law enforcement administration, and corrections. 

146 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Mr. Koller 

The study of the distribution of status, wealth, and power in modern and traditional 
societies. The formation and changes in systems of social inequality and the correlates 
and consequences of social class position and mobility.* 

150 MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY Mr. Ruth 

Sociological factors of health and illness; the social organization of modern medicine; 
sociological analysis of the role and status of medical and paramedical personnel in 
this country, social differences in the acquisition of medical aid and in the reaction to 
medical treatment. Recommended for junior and senior premedical students. 

201 SENIOR SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY Mr. Ruth 

An advanced seminar stressing sociological theory, including contemporary issues 
and dimensions of social existence. Seeks to integrate all prior course work in 
Sociology in a meaningful manner. Graduate Record Examination is required. 
Required of all senior majors. No others admitted. 

295 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN SOCIOLOGY Staff 

Not offered in term in which student is taking either 301 or 401. Admission by 
permission of the professor. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

An examination, under departmental direction. 



110 



401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

An examination, project or activity under departmental direction. 

* Recommended only for students who have had Sociology 101 or those with junior or 
senior standing. 



SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES 



Assistant Professor Devon. 

In Addition. Professor Ratliff. 

Associate Professor Kaylor. 

Instructor Michalson. 



Area Reauirement: Any course numbered below 200 may be counted toward the 
fulfillment of the are^ requirement in Social Science. 

This is an interdisciplinary program focusing on an important part of the non-western 
world: India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Sikkim, and Bhutan. The 
program offers no major. However, it offers interested students an opportunity to 
explore from a variety of disciplinary viewpoints the South Asian region and a rich 
culture other than theirown.Opportunity for study of Hindi or Urdu is available under 
295. 

Most of the courses described below are cross-listed in two or more departments 
and meet course requirements as stipulated by those departments. Although it is not 
necessary to take both the first and second term of the South Asian civilization course, 
the two terms are designed to present the student with a continuity of economic, 
political, and cultural change from the ancient period to the present. 

101 CIVILIZATION OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

An introduction to the cultural history of the Indian sub-continent, with an emphasis 
on the literary and artistic achievements of the ancient and medieval periods. 

102 CIVILIZATION OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

An introduction to the economic, social and political developments in nineteenth 
and twentieth-century South Asia. 

135 ECONOMICS OF SOUTH ASIA Mr. Ratliff 

Same as Economics 135. A study of the economic features, problems, and policies of 
the region. 

156 POLITICS OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

Same as Political Science 156. A study of the governmental systems and current 
political development in the nations of South Asia. 

159 SOCIAL CHANGE AND MODERNIZATION OF SOUTH ASIA Mrs. Devon 

An examination of selected aspects of development and modernizing change in the 
countries of South Asia. Attention will be given to the social and cultural contexts for 
change and to the problems of population, food supply, education, and policy 
planning in the region. 

162 COMPARATIVE RELIGION: THE RELIGIONS 
OF SOUTH ASIA Mr. Kaylor, Mr. Michalson 

Same as Religion 172. A critical study of the chief religions of ancient and modern 
India; Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Zoroastrianism (Parseeism), )ainism,and Sikhism. 
Some attempt will be made to assess their social significance. 

173 HINDUISM Mr. Kaylor 

A study of the origin and development of the Hindu tradition. Attention will be given 
to the ancient sources of the Hindu tradition, its use of myth and ritual, its responses to 
encounters with Islam and Christianity, and its modern expressions. Ill 



South Asian, Spanish 174 BUDDHISM Mr. Michalson 

An introduction to the origins and development of Buddhist thought and practice. 
The life of Gautama Buddha, the emergence of Buddhist sects, and the spread of 
Buddhism throughout East Asia will be surveyed. 

201 TUTORIALIN SOUTH ASIA STUDIES Staff 

Individual programs of supervised study on selected topics related to South Asia. 
295-299 INDEPENDENT STUDY • ^taff 



SPANISH 

Assistant Professors Kemp, Rogerson. 
Instructor HIibtscfiuk. 

Area Requirement: Any course numbered 20 or above will count toward the 
fulfillment of the area requirement in Language, Literature and the Arts. 

Language Requirement: Completion of Spanish 20 meets the foreign language 
proficiency required for the degree. 

Major Requirements: Seven courses above the 20 level including at least one from 
each of the following four areas: 

Area 1: Civilization of Spain and Latin America (110, 111) 

Area II: Literature of Spain prior to 1700 (1 20, 1 21 , 1 22, 1 23, 1 24) 

Area III: Literature of Spain since 1700 (131. 132, 133, 134) 

Area IV: Literature of Latin America (141,142,143) -' 

Extended Studies 301 and 401 are also required. A comprehensive examination is 
required in the spring term of the senior year. 

Study in a Spanish-speaking country is strongly recommended but not required. 
Also recommended is at least a minimum knowledge of a second foreign 
language. 

Placement of Freshmen: Achievement examinations taken at Davidson 

College will be used for placement. Normally students with two years of high 
school Spanish will take Spanish 10: students with three years of high school 
Spanish will take Spanish 20: students with four years of high school Spanish will 
take Spanish 20, or Spanish 100 as an optional course, or will be considered as 
having satisfied the language requirement depending upon the results of the 
achievement tests. 

Study Abroad: With the approval of the department chairman, courses taken at a 
Spanish-speaking university under the Davidson College foreign study plan may 
be substituted for courses beyond Spanish 20. 

1 BEGINNING SPANISH Staff 

An introduction to speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish. Practice in 
the language laboratory is an integral part of the course. No prerequisite. 

10 CONTINUING SPANISH Staff 

Development of further skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing 
Spanish through a review of grammar and readings in the literature and culture of 
1 1 2 Spain and/or Latin America. Practice in the language laboratory is required. 

Prerequisite. Spanish 7 or its equivalent. 



20 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH Staff 

Spanish 
Extensive reading and discussion in Spanish of texts of moderate difficulty in the 
culture and literature of Spain and/or Latin America, including short stories, poetry, 
theater, a short novel. Practice in the language laboratory is required. Satisfactory 
completion of this course meets the degree requirement for proficiency in foreign 
language and fulfills an area requirement. Prerequisite, Spanish TO or its equivalent. 

51 LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION Staff 

Novels and short stories by major 20th Century writers from various countries 
including Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Colombia, Peru, or Argentina, studied against a 
background of the contemporary history and culture they reflect. All readings and 
class discussions are in Erpglish. Not available for credit toward a Spanish major. 

100 SPANISH CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION Miss Kemp 

Training and practice to develop fluency, accuracy, and expressiveness in oral and 
written communication. Strongly recommended for students planning to study 
abroad. Prerequisite. Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

110 CIVILIZATION OF SPAIN Miss Kemp 

Readings, discussion, and oral reports on Spain's history, social, economic, and 
political evolution, and her music, art, and architecture. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite. Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

111 CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA Staff 

A survey of the development of Latin America and its cultural achievements, with 
emphasis on several key countries and on the roleof Indians and blacks. Conducted in 
Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

120 CHRISTIAN,MOOR, AND JEW IN MEDIEVAL SPAIN Mr. Rogerson 

The civilization and literature of Medieval Spain studied in the context of co-existence 
among Christians, Moors, and Jews. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite.- Spanisli 20. 

121 MASTERPIECES OF SPANISH LITERATURE Staff 

A survey of major works from medieval to contemporary times studied against a 
background of historical developments and literary currents. Stress is given to analysis 
and critical interpretation. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 20 or its 
equivalent. 

122 THEATER OF SPAIN'S GOLDEN AGE Mr. Rogerson 

Development and characterization of 16th and 17th century Spanish theater, including 
works by Lope de Vega, Cervantes, Tirsode Molina, Ruiz d'eAlarcon, and Calderon de 
la Barca. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. Not offered 
1977-78. 

123 CERVANTES Miss Kemp 

A study in depth of Don Qu/'/ote and the literary criticism it has generated. Conducted 
in Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. Not offered 1977-78. 

124 SPAIN'S GOLDEN AGE PROSE AND POETRY Mr. Rogerson 

Representative selections from 16th and 17th century fiction including books of 
chivalry, the pastoral and picaresque novels, as well as didactic prose, the mystics, and 
lyric poetry, studied against a background of political history and religious thought. 
Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite. Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

131 THEATER AND POETRY OF 19TH CENTURY SPAIN Miss Kemp 

Neoclassicismand Romanticism in the theater of Moratin,Zorrilla, Echegaray, through 

the realism of Galdos; prose and poetry from the early Romantics through Becquer 

and Rosalia de Castro. Conducted in Spanish. Prere(juisite. Spanish 20 or its 113 

equivalent. 



Spanish 132 NOVEL AND SHORT STORY OF 19TH century Spain Miss Kemp 

The development of Realism and Naturalism in fiction from the costumbrismo of 
Larra; primary emphasis on works of Galdos and Clarin. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

133 THEATER AND POETRY OF 20TH CENTURY SPAIN Miss Kemp 

Major works of theater from Benavente through Garcia Lorca to Buero Vallejo; a 
survey of major poets before and after the Generation of 1927. Conducted in Spanish. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

134 FICTION AND ESSAY OF 20TH CENTURY SPAIN Staff 

The Generation of 1898 including Unamuno, Baroja, Valle-lnclan, Azorin, through 
Ortega y Gasset to Cela. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its 
o.-'-/va/ent. Not offered 1977-78. 

141 lATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE PRIOR TO 1880 Mr. Rogerson 

A jLJrvey of major figures from the Conquest through Colonial times to In- 
dependence, with special emphasis on Sor Juana ines de la Cruz, gaucho poetry, and 
the Romantic novel. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

M2 LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY AND POETRY SINCE 1880 Miss Kemp 

Short fiction from Quiroga through Borges; poetry from the Modernist movement 
and Ruben Dario through Pablo Neruda. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite, Spanish 
20 or its equivalent. 

143 CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN NOVEL Staff 

Representative works of major figures from Mexico, Guatemala, Cuba, Colombia, 
Peru, or Argentina studied against a background of recent history and contemporary 
culture. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 20 or its equivalent. 

207,208 SEMINAR IN SPECIAL TOPICS -' Staff 

A seminar for study of an area in literature or civilization outside the content of other ' 
core courses. The subject will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Conducted in j 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 20 or its equivalent. [ 

250,251,252 SEMINARS FOR SPRING TERM IN SPAIN Staff' 

260,261,262 SEMINARS FOR SPRING TERM I N LATIN AMERICA Stafi 

Three courses offered in Spain or Latin America during the Spring Term and taught by 
the Davidson resident director alone or with a team-teacher from a local Spanish or ' 
Latin American university. The seminars normally offer language, civilization and con- 
temporary culture, and special topics. They are open to ten or more qualified students 
regardless of projected majors. Prerequisite: Spanis/i 20. Screening of applicants begins jy 
during the fall term. | 

295,296 INDEPENDENTSTUDY, TUTORIALS, SPECIALTOPICS Staff 

Special topics, themes, a genre, or a single figure in literature, history, or culture, 
outside the content of other courses. Prerequisite, Any two literature or civilization 
courses, or approval of the chairman and the instructor. 

301 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR JUNIORS Staff 

The exploration of an area in literature or civilization which is of special interest to the 
student. Consultations with the adviser, short papers, and a final research term paper. 

401 EXTENDED STUDIES FOR SENIORS Staff 

114 Readings, discussions, and short papers on works chosen from the Major's Reading 

List in preparation for the comprehensive examination, and one term paper. 



THE FACULTY, 1976-77 



*Anthony S. Abbott, Associate Professor of English (1964, 1967) 

A.B. (Princeton), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Robert Livingston Avinger, Dean of the Center for Honors Studies (1967, 1972) 

and Associate Professor of Economics 
A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. tDuke) 

William Russell Bdi\ch, instructor in Psyciiology (1976,1976) 

B.A. (Haverford), Ph.D. (Minnesota) 

Rupert T. Barber, Jr., Associate Professor of Speecli and Drama (1963, 1972) 

B.S., Ph.D. (Louisiana State), M.A. (Columbia) 

Richard Ryerson Bernard, Richardson Professor of Mathematics (1955, 1959) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Frank Walker Bliss, Jr., Professor of English (1963, 1966) 

A.B. (Emory), M.A., Ph.D. (Minnesota) 

D'Arcy Jonathan Dacre Boulton, Instructor in History (1975, 1975) 

B.A. (Toronto), M.A. (Penn.), D.Phil. (Oxford) 

Horace Alden Bryan, Professor of Chemistry (1955, 1967) 

A.B. (King), Ph.D. (Tennessee) 

John Nicholas Burnett, Associate Professor of Chemistry (1968, 1972) 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D. (Emory) 

Richard Clyde Burts, Jr., Registrar and Professor of Psychology (1961, 1961 ) 

A.B. (Furman), M.A., Ed.D. (Columbia) 

Felix Alvin Carroll, Jr., Ass/stan( Professor of Chemistry (1972, 1972) 

B.S. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Ph.D. 
(California Institute of Technology) 

Thomas A. Cartmill, Professor of Physical 

Education and Athletic Director (1974, 1974) 

B.S. (Springfield), M.Ed. (Johns Hopkins) 

Verna M. Case, Assistant Professor of Bioiogy (1974,1976) 

B.S., M.S.. Ph.D. (Penn State University) 

Thomas Fetzer Clark, Associate Professor of Religion (1958, 1964) 

A.B. (Davidson), B.D. (Union Seminary, Richmond), 
Ph.D. (Aberdeen) 

Richard Cargill Cole, Professor of English (1961, 1961) 

A.B. (Hamilton), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Van Allen Collins/l5S/sZ^a/7f Professor of Military Science (1976,1976) 

B.B.A. (Midwestern State) 

jean S. Cornell, Assistant Professor of Speech (1971, 1974) 

B.A. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.S.J. (Nortnwestern), M.A. (Arizona) 

Charles L. Cornwell, Associate Professor of English (1964, 1975) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Tom Daggy, Professor of Biology (1947, 1957) 

A.B. (Earlham), M.S., Ph.D. (Northwestern) 

*0n leave, Spring Term 



117 



FACULTY Mark Ingraham Dav\es, Assistant Professor of Classics (1971,1973) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) (1976,1976) 

Tonia K. Devon, Assistant Professor of Political Science (1974, 1974) 

and Director of South Asian Studies 
B.A. (Grinnell), M.A. (Wisconsin), Ph.D. (Berkeley) 

Charles D. Dockery, Assistant Professor of French (1974, 1974) 

B.A. (Earlham), M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa) 

Joseph Turpin Drake, Professor of Sociology (1957, 1957) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

C. Earl Edmondson. Assistant Professor of History (1970, 1970) 

B.A. (Mississippi College), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Patricia B. Edmondson, Visiting Assistant Professor (1976,1976) 

of Poiitical Science 
B.A. (Midwestern), M.A.. Ph.D. (Duke) 

Hansford M. Epes, Jr., Associate Professor of German (1964, 1975) 

A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

Jerry W. Flannagan, Assistant Professor of Military Science ' (1975, 1975) 

B.A. (Methodist) 

James Monroe Fredericksen, Professor of Chemistry (1957, 1962) 

B.S. (Richmond), Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Dirk French, Associate Professor of Classics (1967, 1975) 

A.B. (Lawrence), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

William Francis Frey, Associate Professor of Physics (1960, 1964) 

A.B. (King), M.S., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt) 

Ralph William Gable, Associate Professor of Chemistry j (1960, 1964) 

B.S (Texas), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Joseph Tate Gardner, Jr., Instructor in Drama and Speech (1974, 1974) 

B.A. (Davidson), M.A. (Florida State) 

Richard William Gates, Assistant Professor of Military Science (1 976,1 976) 

B.A. (North Carolina State) 

Cynthia Thomas Grant, Assistant Professor of Biology (1972, 1972) 

A.B. (Wellesley), Ph.D. (Yale) 

David Carroll Grant, Associate Professor of Biology (1968, 1974) 

A.B. (Wooster), Ph.D. (Yale) 

William Blannie Hight, jr.. Professor of Education (1962, 1974) 

A.B., M.Ed., Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

Bohdan J. HIibtschuk, Instructor in Spanish (1976,1976) 

B.A. (Illinois), M.A. (Wisconsin) 

John Gill Holland, Associate Professor of English (1967, 1973) 

A.B. (Washington and Lee), Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

John Isaac Hopkins, James Buchanan Duke Professor of Physics (1958, 1960) 

B.S., M.A.. Ph.D. (Duke) 

Douglas Clay Houchens, Professor of /irt (1953,1976) 

B.F.A., M.F.A. (Richmond Professional Institute) 

Robert Bruce Jackson, Jr., Professor of Mathematics (1956, 1966) 

llg B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Duke) 



Walter Herbert Jackson, Assistant Professor of Art 
A.B. (Davidson), M.F.A. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

Everett F. Jacobus, Jr., Assistant Professor of French 
A.B. (Duke), Ph.D. (Cornell) 

Frontis Withers Johnston, Vice President for Academic Affairs and 
Dean of the Faculty; Wm. R. Kenan, Jr., Professor of History 
A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Yale) 

Robert David Kaylor, Associate Professor of Religion 

A.B. (Southwestern), B.D. (Louisville Seminary), Ph.D. (Duke) 

John E. Kello, Assistant Professor of Psychiology 
B.S. (Old Dominion), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

John Dobbins Kelton, Professor of Psychology 
B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

Lois Anne Kemp, Assistant Professor of Spanish 

A.B. (Middlebury), M.A. (Denver), M.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 

Donald L. Kimmel, Jr., Associate Professor of Biology 
A.B. (Swarthmore), M.D., M.Sc. (Temple), Ph.D. 
(Johns Hopkins) 

Randall Rich Kincaid, Jr, Assoc/a(e Professor of Economics 
A.B. (Wofford), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Lunsford Richardson King, Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Duke) 

Benjamin G. Klein, Associate Professor o/^ Ma(hemaf/cs 
A.B. (Rochester), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Norman B. Koller, Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.S., M.S. (Brigham Young), Ph.D. (Indiana) 

Mitchel Lee Kotula, Assistant Professor of Military Science 
B.A. (California Polytechnic College) 

George Labban, Jr., W.R. Grey Professor of Classics 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Texas) 

William Tuthill Lammers, Associate Professor of Biology 
A.B. (Emory), M.S. (Ohio State), Ph.D. (Emory) 

William David Lawing, Instructor in Music 

B.A. (Davidson), M.M., D.M.A. (Cleveland Institute of Music) 

Jerry Gale Ledford, Professor of Military Science 
B.S., M.S. (Tennessee) 

Malcolm Lester, Professor of History 

A.B. (Mercer), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Larry L. Ligo, Assistant Professor of Art 

A.B. (Muskingum), B.D. (Princeton Seminary) 
Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 

Glenn Carlos Lindsey, Ass/'s(anf Professor of Economics 
B.B.A., M.B.A. (Georgia) 

Charles Edward Lloyd, Professor of English 
A.B., M.A. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill) 



1969, 1972) 

1971, 1972) 
1935, 1941) 

1964, 1968) 
1974, 1975) 
1959, 1966) 

1972, 1972) 
1971, 1971) 

1967, 1973) 
1964, 1968) 
1971,1976) 

1973, 1975) 
1976,1976) 

1952, 1960) 

1959, 1964) 

1976,1976) 
1976,1976) 

1959, 1959) 
1970, 1973) 

1958, 1961) 
1956,1976) 



FACULTY 



119 



FACULTY Earl Ronald MacCormac, Professor of Ptiilosopfiy 

B.E., M.A., B.D., Ph.D. (Yale) 

John Alexander McGeachy, Mary Reynolds Babcock 
Professor of History 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Alexander Jeffrey McKelway, Associate Professor of Religion 
A.B. (Davidson), B.D. (Princeton Seminary), Th.D. (Basel) 

* Samuel Dow Maloney, Professor of Religion 

A.B. (Davidson), B.D., Th.M., Th.D. (Union Seminary, Richmond) 

Robert John Manning, Associate Professor of Physics 
A.B. (Gettysburg), M.S., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Robert E. Maydole, Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.S. (St. Joseph's), Ph.D. (Boston University) 

Gordon E. Michalson, Jr., Instructor in Religion 

B.A. (Yale), Rel. M. (Claremont School of Religion), 
M.A., Ph.D (Princeton) 

Winfred Pleasants Minter, Professor of Political Science 
B.S., M.S. (Virginia Polytechnic), Ph.D. (Chicago) 

*Cora Louise Nelson, Professor of Economics 
B.S., Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

William Rodger Nutt, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
A.B. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Jay Harold Ostwalt, Professor of Psychology and Education 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

*Edward L. Palmer, Assistant Professor of Psychology j 

A.B. (Gettysburg), B.D. (Gettysburg Seminary) 
M.S., Ph.D. (Ohio) 

Leiand Madison Park, Director of the Library 

A.B. (Davidson), M.Ln. (Emory), Adv. M. in L.S., 
Ph.D. (Florida State) 

** Malcolm Overstreet Partin, Associate Professor of History 
A.B. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Ernest Finney Patterson, Professor of Economics 

B.S. (Southwest Texas Teachers), M.A., Ph.D. (Texas) 

William Brown Patterson, Jr., Professor of History 

A.B. (University of the South), A.B., M.A., (Oxford), 

B.D. (Episcopal Theological School), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Thomas Owen Pinkerton, Professor of German 

B.S. (Davidson), LL.B. (Vanderbilt), Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

Donald Bryce Plott, diaries A. Dana Professor of Music 
B.Mus., M.Mus. (Michigan) 

Max Eugene Polley, Professor of Religion 
A.B. (Albion), B.D., Ph.D. (Duke) 

**J. Harris Proctor, Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science 
A.B. (Duke), M.A. (Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy), 
Ph.D. (Harvard) 

*On leave Spring Term. 
**0n leave Fall Term. 



(1961, 


1 
1972) 


(1938, 


1950) 


(1965, 


1968) 


(1954, 


1967) 


(1968, 1975) 


(1974, 


1974) 


(1975, 


1975) 


(1957, 


1968) 


(1964, 1975) 


(1971, 


, 1972) 


(1948, 


, 1966) 


(1970, 


, 1970) 


(1967 


,1975) 


(1968, 


1973) 


(1957, 


1966) 


(1963, 


1976) 


(1960, 


1968) 


(1951, 


1962) 


(1956, 


1966) 


(1970, 


1970) 



James Slicer Purcell, Jr., Professor of English (1948, 1957) FACULTY 

A.B. (Stetson), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Jerry L. Putnam, Assistant Professor of Biology (1973, 1973) 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. (Texas A & M) 

Charles Edward Ratliff, Jr., Charles A. Dana (1947, 1960) 

Professor'ot tconomtcs 
B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Joseph D. Retzer, Assistant Professor of Political Science (1973, 1976) 

B.A. (Vanderbilt), M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 

Daniel Durham Rhodes, ].W. Cannon Professor of Religion (1960, 1960) 

A.B. (Davidson), B.D. (Louisville Seminary) Ph.D. (Duke) 

David Frank Richey, Associate Professor of Music (1960, 1968) 

B.Mus., M.Mus. (Oberlin), B.Mus., M.Mus. (Yale) 

Jerry Allan Roberts, Associate Professor of Mathematics (1965, 1969) 

B.E. Py., M.S., Ph.D. (North Carolina State) 

Thomas A. Rogerson, Assistant Professor of Spanish (1964, 1964) 

A.B. (Queens, N.Y.), M.A. (Wisconsin) 

Robert D. Ruth, Assistant Professor of Sociology (1971, 1974) 

A.B. (State University of New York), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Merlyn D. Schuh, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1975, 1975) 

B.A. (South Dakota), Ph.D. (Indiana) 

David Emory Sh\, Instructor in History (1976,1976) 

B.A. (Furman), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Samuel Reid Spencer, Jr., President of the College (1951, 1955) 

and Professor of History 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Lance Keith Stall, /l55/5fa/7/^ Professor of Philosophy (7976,1976) 

B.A. (Hope), M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan) 

Raymond H. Stone, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physical Education (1972, 1972) 

A.B., M.A.T., Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

Junius Brutus Stroud, Professor of Mathematics (1960, 1976) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Wiliam Holt Terry , Dean of Students (1962,1971) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.Div. (Union Seminary, Richmond) 

Jean E. Vache, Visiting Lecturer in French (1976,1976) 

(Fall and Winter Only) 

Licence es Lettres, Diplome d'Etudes Superieures (Sorbonne), 
Agregation 

Hallam Walker, Professor of French (1965, 1972) 

A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Wilmer Hayden Welsh, Professor of Music (1963, 1972) 

B.S. (Johns Hopkins), B.Mus., M.Mus., Artist's Diploma 
(Peabody Conservatory) 

Locke White, Jr., Professor of Physics (1961, 1961) 

B.S. (Davidson), Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 



Julius Sherman Winkler, Associate Professor of German (1961, 1967) 

A.B. (Ohio Wesleyan), M.A., Ph.D., (Princeton) 



121 



FACULTY 



Albert Allen Wolf, Associate Professor of Physics (1965, 1969) 

A.B., M.A. (Vanderbilt), Ph.D. (Georgia Institute of Technology) 

William Gatewood Workman, Richardson Professor of Psychology (1951, 1951] 

B. Ph., M.A. , B.D. (Emory), Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Erich-Oskar Joachim Siegfried Wruck, Associate Professor of German (1962, 1969) 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D. (Rutgers) 

*Lauren W. Yoder, Assistant Professor of French (1973, 1975) 

B.A. (Eastern Mennonite), M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa) 

John J. Young, Assistant Professor of Philosophy (1970, 1972) 

A.B., M.A. (John Carroll), M.A., Ph.D. (Virginia) 

Georgianna Ziegler, Assistant Professor of English (1973, 1975) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Penn.) 

*Foreign Study Abroad, France 

The first date above is that of original appointment to 
the faculty and the second is thaf date of appointment 
to current faculty rank. 



EMERITI 



122 



George Lawrence Abernethy, Charles A. Dana (1946, 1976) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 
A.B. (Bucknell), M.A. (Oberlin), Ph.D. (Michigan) 

John Rood Cunningham, President Emeritus of the College ^ (1941, 1957) 

A.B. (Westminster), B.D. (Louisville Seminary), 
D.D. (Westminster), LL.D. (King, Duke, Wake Forest, 
U.N.C.— Chapel Hill, Davidson) 

John Crooks Bailey, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Classics (1925, 1971) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.A. (Johns Hopkins) 

Carrie Brittain, Circulation and Reference Librarian, Emerita (1960, 1970) 

A.B. (Woman's College, Greensboro), B.S. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 
M.A. (West Virginia) 

Elmer Evans Brown, Professor Emeritus of Biology (1939, 1973) 

A.B. (Davidson), Ph.D. (Cornell) 

James Young Causey, Professor Emeritus of Spanish (1948, 1972) 

A.B. (Virginia), M.A. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill), Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 

William Patterson Gumming, Virginia Lasater Irvin (1927, 1968) 

Professor Emeritus of English 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Princeton) 

Chalmers G. Davidson, Professor Emeritus of History (1936, 1976) 

and Director Emeritus of the Library (1975) 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A. in L.S. (Chicago), M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 

Joe Otis Embry, Richardson Professor Emeritus of French (1961, 1974) 

A.B. (Drury), M.A. (Iowa), Ph.D. (Minnesota) (Deceased luly 5, 1976) 

John Bryant Calient, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1942, 1972) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 



Francis Chigo, Professor Emeritus of French (1959, 1974) EMERITI 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

Arthur Gwynn Griffin, F'rofessor Emeritus of Economics (1946, 1967) 

and Business Administration 
A.B., M.A. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

Claude L. Ives, Professor Emeritus of Education (1945, 1953) 

A.B., M.A. (U.N.C.— Chapel Hill) 

John Thomas Kimbrough, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1928, 1974) 

B.S. (Davidson), M. S. (Chicago) 

William Gillespie McGavock, Charles A. Dana Professor (1934, 1975) 

Emeritus of Mathematics 
A.B. (Davidson), M.A., Ph.D. (Duke) 

Myron W. McGill, Bursar and Assistant Treasurer, Emeritus (1922, 1968) 

B.S. (Davidson) 

James Walker Reid, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Ceography (1942, 1972) 

B.S. (Davidson), M.A. (Columbia), Ph.D. (Peabody) 

Lewis Bevins Schenck, J. W. Cannon Professor Emeritus of Bible (1927, 1966) 

A.B. (Davidson), B.D. (Union Seminary), 
S.T.M. (Princeton Seminary), Ph.D. (Yale) 

Tom Scott, Professor Emeritus and Director of (1955, 1974) 

Physical Education, Emeritus 
B.S. (Kansas State Teachers), M.A. (Iowa), Ed.D. (Columbia) 

George Byron Watts, Professor Emeritus of French (1926, 1961) 

A.B. (Dartmouth), M.A. (Harvard), Ph.D. (Minnesota) 

James Baker Woods, Jr., College Physician Emeritus (1942, 1961) 

A.B. (Davidson), M.D. (Medical College of Virginia) 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF, 1976-77 
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Samuel Reid Spencer, Jr., A.B., M.A., Ph.D., L.L.D., President 
Peter F. Clark, A.B. (Davidson), Assistant to the President 
Loyce Davis, Secretary to the President 
Janie K. French, Administrative Assistant 

ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Frontis W. Johnston, A.B., Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs 

and Dean of the Faculty 
Nancy R. Arnette, B.A. (U.N.C. -Charlotte), Administrative Secretary 

Center for Special Studies 

Robert L. Avinger, Jr., A.B. Ph.D., Dean 
Jean Daughtry, Staff Secretary 

Academic Services 

Ruth Pittard, B.S. (E. Carolina University), Instructional Assistant, A V Service 

Priscilla J. Snouse, B.S. (Miami, Ohio), Instructional Assistant, Language Laboratory 123 



Ill 

S! 
V 



ADMINISTRATIVE Admissions 

STAFF (_, Edmunds White, B.S. (Davidson), M.Ed. (South Carolina), Dean of 

Admissions and Financial Aid 
Leonard L. Satterwhite, B.A. (Vanderbilt), Admissions Counselor 
C. Anthony Boon, Jr., A.B. (Davidson), /I o'/t7/s5/o/75 Counselor 
Brenda F. Parnell, B.A. (North Carolina State), Assistant Director of Admissions 

and Financial Aid 
Sue Bsiggett, Staff Secretary ;| it 

Diane S. Lindabury,5ro/'f5ecrer(7A-y 
Pilar Ramsey, Staff Secretary 
Lynda D. Suther, B.A. (UNC-Charlotte), SfeA705rap/7er 

Athletics and Physical Education 

Thomas A. Cartmill, B.S.,M.Ed., Direaor of Physical Education and Athletics 
Thomas William Bond Couch, B.S. (Western Carolina), M.S. (Indiana), Assistant 

Director of Athletics and hiead Trainer 
Raymond H. Stone, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Physical Education and Intramurals; 

Head Coach. Soccer 
James P. Colbert, B.Ed. (U. De\aware), Assistant Football Coach 

Edward G. Farrell, B.S. (Rutgers), M.A. (New York University), F\ead Coach, Football 
Jeff Frank, A.B. (Davidson), J.D. (University of Florida), Physical Education 

Instructor; tiead Coach, Tennis 
Philip F. Janaro, B.A. (King's), M.A. (Bridgeport), Physical Education Instructor; 

Assistant Coach, Football 
John Kochan, Jr., B.A. (C.U.N.Y.), M.A. (University of Maryland), /Iss/sro/?? Basketball Cich 
Sterling T. Martin, A.B. (Davidson), Physical Education Instructor; Head Coach, 

Cross Country, Track 
Patricia D. Miller, B.S. , M.A.T. (South Carolina), Instructor Physical Education; 

Swim Coach s 

Tom Miller, B.S. (New York State), Assistant Football Coach iil 

Palmer W. Muench, B.A. (Williamette), Baseball Coach 
Charles W. Parker, B.S. (Davidson), Physical Education Instructor; Head Coach, 

Wrestling; Lake Campus Director )■ 

Emil Parker, A.B. (Lenoir Rhyne), Director, Sports Information ' I 

Dave Pritchett, B.A. (Salem), M.A. (West Virginia), Head Basketball Coach I 

David Thomas Roberts, B.S., M.A. (Western Carolina), Physical Education Instructor; 

Assistant Coach, Football 
Susan Roberts, B. A. (Ohio), M.A. (University of Arizona), Women's Basketball Coach 
Raymond B. Wilson, B.S. (Boston \Jr\\yers\t\), Assistant Basketball Coach 
Rebecca G. Grooms, Stenographer, Basketball Office 
Christine S. FHolder, General Clerk, Ticket Office 

Brenda P. King, Stenographer, Basketball Office ; 

Patricia Krug, Stenographer, Football Office 
Louise Martin, Stenographer 
Betty Walley, Staff Secretary 

College Union 

Colin Shaw Smith, A.B. (Davidson), M.A. (^U.N.C. -Chapel Hill), Director of the 

College Union and Coordinator of Stuaent Activities 
William H. Brown, A.B. (Davidson), M.C.E. (P. S.C.E.), Assistant Director, College Union 
Keith Vanstone, B.S. (Davidson), Operaf/om Manager, College Union 
Myrtle Knox, Staff Secretary 
Lynda Daniels, Staff Secretary 



Counseling 

William Blannie Might, Jr., A.B. , M.Ed., Ph.D., Director of Student Counseling Center 
and Director of Student Teaching 
1 24 Catherine Wilson, Instructional Assistant 



Dean of Students ADMINISTRATIVE 

William Holt Terry, A.B. (Davidson), M.Div. (Union Seminary, Richmond), Dean of ->! Arh 

Students 
Mary Lou Dietler, B.A. (Longwood), M.A. (Virginia), 

Assistant Dean of Students 
Maria Amelia Dockery, B.S. (Licee National Diogo Cao), Licencee-es-Lettres in Clinical 

Psychology (Montpellier), C//'n/ca/ Psychologist 
Meredith Hall, B.S. (Texas), Ph.D. (Maryland), Clinical Psychologist 
William Gatewood Workman, B.Ph., M.A., B.D. (Emory), Ph.D. (Chicago), Clinical 

Psychologist 
RushOtey, B.A. (Presbyterian), D.Min. (Union, Richmond) , Minister to Students 
Frank Donatelli, B.S. (Penn State), M.D. (Temple University), College Physician 
Charles T. Ellithorpe, B.S. (Wake Forest), M.D. (Bowman-Gray Medfical School), 

College Physician 
Jerome Howard, B.S. (Union College), M.D. (Upstate Medical Center, 

Syracuse), College Physician 
Ricnard A. Kerecman, B.S. (Allegheny College), M.D. (Bowman-Gray Medical School), 

College Physician 
Dorothy Sherrill, R.N., Superintendent of Infirmary 
Edith Cnristian, R.N., General Duty Nurse Infirmary 
Dorothy Fleming, R.N., Assistant, Infirmary 
Avonne W. Goodson, R.N., Assistant, Infirmary 
Joretta Archie, Administrative Secretary, Dean of Students Office 

Experiential Programs and Life/Work Planning 

Kenneth N. Wood, B.A. (Westminster), M.Div. (Princeton), Director of Experiential 

Programs and Life/Work Planning 
Brencia Sue Summers, Staff Secretary 

International Education 

Louise B. Thompson, B.S. (Bridgewater), M.Ed. (Boston University), Secretary to 
the Academic Vice President in Charge of International Affairs 

Library 

Leiand Madison Park, A.B. (Davidson), M.Ln. (Emory), Adv. M. of L.S., Ph.D. (Florida 

State University), Director of the Library 
Mary D. Beaty, B.A. (Agnes Scott), Ph.D. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Reference Coordinator 

for Independent Study 
Chalmers Gaston Davidson, A.B., M.A. in L.S., M.A., Ph.D., College Archivist 
Mary Sewell Helvey, A.B. (Concord), B.S. in L.S. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Assistant 

Cataloguer 
Eleanor T. Munn, B.A. (Baldwin-Wallace), M.A. (Penn State), M.L.S. (Simmons), 

Assistant Cataioguer 
Hattie R. Pendergraft, B.A. (Campbell), M.S. in L.S. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Head of 

Serials Department 
Eveiyne B. Thomas, A.B. and M.A. {Mdbama), tiead of Acquisitions Department 
Evelyn Cnm\nger , Staff Secretary 

Ursula Fogleman, A. A. (Virginia Intermont), Assistant Acquisitionist 
Frances T. Reid, Circulation Supervisor 
Nadine Caldwell, Library Assistant 
Shirley Childers, Library Assistant 
Bobbi P. Dalton, Library Assistant 
Barbara Irwin, Library Assistant 
Joyce McEver, Library Assistant 
Violet Weisner, Library Assistant 
Mary Wilson, Library Assistant 

Military Science 

Jerry G. Ledford, B.S., M.S., Lieutenant Coionei, Armor 

Van. A. Collins, B.S., i\1a/or, Air Defense Artiliery 

Richard W, Gates, B.A., Major, Quartermaster Corps 

Jerry W. Flannigan, B.A., Captain, Field Artiiiery 

Mitchel L. Kotula, B.S., Captain, Infantry 

Leon E. Graves, B.A., Master Sergeant 1 25 



ADMINISTRATIVE Richard L. Clark, Staff Sergeant 

^--P . pp Franklin D. Thomas, Sergeant First Class 

Ji f^'~ • Billy R. Tummond, Staff Sergeant 

Garland L. Keever, Department of Army Civilian 

Registrar 

Richard Clyde Burts, Jr., A.B., M.A., Ed.D., Registrar 

Eleanor Northcott, A.B. (U.N.C. -Greensboro), Assistant to the Registrar 

Frances G. McCorkle, Staff Secretary 

DEVELOPMENT 

Duane A. Dittman, A.B. (Colgate), Vice President for Development 
Ann M. Grubbs, Administrative Secretary 

Alumni and Development 

Thomas M. Bernhardt, A.B. (Davidson), Director of thie Living Endowment 

P. S. Carnegie, B.S. (Davidson), Executive Director, Wildcat Club 

Zachary F. Long, Jr., A.B. (Davidson), M.B.A. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), Director of 

Alumni Activities 
Julius W. Melton, Jr., B.A. (Mississippi College), B.D., Th.M. (Union Seminary, 

Richmond), A.M., Ph.D. (Princeton), Director of Special Resources 
Robert Tousignant, B.A. {Spr\ngf\e\d) , Director of Corporate Programs 
Nancy Blackwell, Assistant to the Director of Alumni Activities 
Mary Mack Benson, Staff Secretary, Development 
Frances Howie, B.S. (Montreat) Stenographer, Alumni Office 
joette Kellogg, Staff Secretary 
Peggy Kerns, Stenograplier, Wildcat Club 
Frances White, Staff Secretary, Development 

Communications 

Martha B. Roberts, A.B. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), M.S. (U.T.-Knoxville), Director 

of Communications 
Earl W. Lawrimore, A.B. (Davidson), Director of News and Photography 
Patricia Burgess, Publications Assistant 
Marion Snow , Staff Secretary, Communications 

FINANCE 
Business Manager 

Robert Arrowood Currie, B.S. (Davidson), M.B.A. (Pennsylvania). C.P.A., 

Business Manager 
Carolyn Bourdeaux, Assistant to the Business Manager 
Gertrude Nicholls, A.B. (Park), Director of Student Housing 
Peter Nicholls, A.B. (Princeton), Manager, Book Store 
Rachel Washam, Genera/ Clerk, Book Store 
Frances Beaver, Manager, College Laundry 
Mattie Fletcher, Hostess. Guest House 

Chloe N. Myers, B.M. (UNC-Greensboro), Clerical Assistant, Student Store 
Ronald Scott, Manager, ARA Dining Services 

Comptroller 

Robert W. Davidson, B.S., M.B.A. (U.N.C.-Chapel Hill), C.P.A., Comptroller 

Joyce Might, Assistant to the Comptroller 

Sarah Burris, Payroll Clerk 

Peggy Cashion, Genera/ Accountant 

Personnel and Administrative Services 

Robert J. Stephenson, B.S. (North Carolina State), Director of Personnel and 

Administrative Services 
Kenneth Carmack, Manager, Data Processing Service 
Bonnie Beck, Staff Secretary 
' '^o Jane N. Biggerstaff , Staff Secretary, Central Services 

Louis Connor, Mimeograph and Mail Service 



Judy CockreW, Stenographer, Faculty Secretarial Services 

Rory Crawford, A.B. (Davidson), Computer Operator 

Mary Earnhardt, Stenographer, Faculty Secretarial Service 

Saran Jackson, Key Punch Operator, Data Processing Service 

Evva H. McKinley, Switchboard Operator 

Elizabeth Shinn, Staff Secfetary, Personnel and Administrative Services 

Patricia C. Stinson, Stenographer, Faculty Secretarial Services 

Physical Plant 

Grover C. Meetze, Jr., B.S. (Davidson), Director of the Physical Plant and 

Facilities Planning 
William J. Barker, Supervisor of Custodians 
Irvin Brawley, B.S. (North Carolina State), Supervisor of Grounds 
Phillip D. Cash ion. Supervisor of Fngineering Maintenance 
Luther D. Honeycutt, Supervisor of Building Maintenance 
Mary Parks Knox, Staff Secretary 



ADMINISTRATIVE 
STAFF 




THE TRUSTEES 



The governing body of Davidson College is The Board of Trustees, twenty-two of 
whom are elected by the Presbyteries of North Carolina, two each by the Everglades 
and Suwannee Presbyteries of Florida, eight by the trustees, and eight by the alumni. 

Mr. Robert T. Amos, Jr. — High Point, North Carolina 
Mr. H. Perrin Anderson — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. James H. Barnhardt — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. J. Harper Beall, Jr. — Lenior, North Carolina 
Mr. Thomas M. Belk — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Dr. Eugenia Q. Blake— Chadbourn, North Carolina 
Mr. Donald G. Bryant— Charlotte, North Carolina 
Dr. David H. W. Burr — Winston-Salem, North Carolina 
The Reverend Milton S. Carothers — Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
The Reverend Charles R. Carter — High Point, North Carolina 
Mr. Ben T. Craig — Reading, Pennsylvania 
Mr. Larry J. Dagenhart — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. G. Don Davidson, Jr. — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. James K. Dorsett, Jr. — Raleigh, North Carolina 
Dr. Robert F. Durden — Durham, North Carolina 
The Reverend Richard R. Gammon — Greenville, North Carolina 
Mr. V. Gaines Grantham, Jr. — Fairmont, North Carolina 
Mr. W. Blair Gwyn — North Wilkesboro, North Carolina 
Mr. Price H. Gwynn, ill — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. Thomas A. Hackney — Lake City, Florida 
Dr. Warner L. Hall — Charlotte, North Carolina 
Mr. Samuel M. Hemphill — Hickory, North Carolina 
Dr. W. Ivan Hoy — Coral Gables, Florida 
Mr. Graeme M. Keith — Augusta, Georgia 
Mr. Edward L. Lilly, Jr.— Raleigh, North Carolina 
Mr. Walter L. Lingle, Jr. — Cincinnati, Ohio 
The Reverend William F. Long — Hamlet, North Carolina 
Dr. James A. McFarland — Columbia, South Carolina 
The Reverend Donald O. Mclnnis — Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. B. Frank Matthews — Gastonia, North Carolina 
Dr. Wayne S. Montgomery — Asheville, North Carolina 
The Reverend Joseph G. Morrison — Wallace, North Carolina 
Mr. Lunsford Richardson, Jr. — Wilton, Connecticut 
The Honorable Dean Rusk — Athens, Georgia 
Mr. W. W. Seymour — Sanford, North Carolina 
Dr. Fred R. Stair — Richmond, Virginia 
Mr. Robert M. Strickland— Atlanta, Georgia 
Mr. John W. Thatcher — Miami, Florida 
Mr. John M. Trask, Jr. — Beaufort, South Carolina 
Mr. E. Craig Wall, Jr. — Conway, South Carolina 
Mr. J. Mason Wallace — Charlotte, North Carolina 
128 Dr. S. Clay Williams, Jr. — Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



The following funds contribute in a significant way to Davidson College and its stu- 
dents, enabling many stu^lents who otherwise could not afford it to receive a David- 
son education. Despite the generosity of the individuals named below, each year the 
college provides additional financial assistance from general funds. Those interested in 
strengthening this scholarship program are invited to contact the college's president. 

Details on how to apply for financial assistance are under "Admission and Finance;" 
students should not apply for specific scholarships by name. 



MAJOR SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS 



SPECIAL 



Edward Crosland Stuart Scholarships — This important, independent scholarship 
program honors the memory of one of Davidson's most outstanding students and 
seeks to perpetuate his ideals. Seniors at selected schools are eligible to be nominated 
for consideration for renewable annual awards ranging up to $3,000. The program is 
funded by the Edward Crosland Stuart Fund and administered by its Directors. See 
additional information under "Admission and Finance." 

HONOR 

Samuel H. Bell Scholarships — Established by a substantial bequest from his daughter, 
Marcia Bell Mitchell. Dr. Bell, a member of the class of 1870, was a Presbyterian 
minister in Georgia and Pennsylvania. 

Charles A. Dana Scholarships - Awarded to approximately 15 members of each of 
the three upper classes on the basis of academic proficiency, character and good 
citizenship, leadership potential, and participation in the college community. 
Stella and Charles Guttman Scholarships — Provided by the Stella and Charles Gutt- 
man Foundation for juniors and seniors; preference to students contemplating grad- 
ate or professional study. 

D. Grier Martin Scholarships — In memory of Davidson's former president, D. Grier 
Martin. Major funding by the ). M. Tull Foundation of Atlanta. Preference given to 
students from Georgia. 

Charles F. Myers - Burlington Scholarships — Established by the Burlington Industries 
Foundation Inc. in honor of Charles F. Myers, Jr., Class of 1 933, for many years the 
chief executive officer of Burlington Industries and a Davidson Trustee. For students 
who are exceptional in academic promise and in the qualities of character, personality 
and potential contribution to society so ably demonstrated by Mr. Myers. 

Lunsford Richardson Scholarships — Established in memory of Mr. Richardson, a 
member of the Class of 1 91 4, by his son and four daughters. 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Staley Scholarships — Restricted to ministerial candidates. 
Established by Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Staley in memory of Mr. Staley's parents. 

GENERAL 

Kenneth Joseph and Anna jane Stevens Braddy Scholarships — Made possible by an 
endowment fund established at Davidson by their son, George W. Braddy. 

C. R. Harding Scholarships — Established by Mrs. Curtis B. Johnson in memory of her 
father, a member of the faculty at Davidson for many years. 

Boyd Calhoun Hipp Scholarships — Named for the late Mr. Hipp, Class of 1943, who 
established a fund to provide scholarships to upperclassmen who show promise of 
contributing effectively and constructively to business leadership in American society. 1 29 



Gordon Clift Horton Scholarships — Established by a substantial bequest from 
Florence Clift Horton in memory of her son, a member of the Class of 1 942. 

Curtis B. Johnson Scholarships — Established by Mrs. Curtis B. Johnson in memory 
of her husband. 

W. E. McElroy Scholarships — Established by a bequest from Mr. McElroy. 

Royster Scholarships — Established by members of a distinguished Virginia family, 
honoring two brothers: William S. Royster, Class of 1 899, and Frank S. Royster, J r. 

Edward C. Stuart Scholarships ~ Endowed by family and friends in memory of 
Edward C. Stuart, Class of 1 954. 

Louise Murphy Williams Scholarships — Restricted to candidates for the ministry. 
Established by Charles ). and Pat M. Williams and through gifts from the Charles J. 
Williams Foundation. 

Woodson Scholarships — Established by the Margaret C. Woodson Foundation. 

ADDITIONAL NAMED SCHOLARSHIPS 

Each of these named funds contributes about 51,000 or more annually to provide 
scholarships for Davidson students: 

Alumni Scholarships — Financed by annual contributions to the Living Endowment 
from Davidson alumni, making a Davidson education possible for students with 
good academic records, character and integrity, who need financial assistance. 

Robert C. and Sadie G. Anderson Scholarships — Awards are made on the basis of 
significant contribution to the college or the community in a particular activity or in 
such areas as character, integrity or leadership. 

William P. Anderson Scholarship — Established by Mr. Anderson, a 1 907 graduate, to 
assist students with demonstrated financial need. 

Professor Ernest A. Beaty Scholarships — Established by the 1969 Davidson College 
General Electric College Bowl team. 

The Bethea Scholarship — Established by the will of A. D. Bethea in honor or 
memory of Osborne Bethea '22, Osborne Bethea, Jr. '63, J. Earle Bethea '47, and 
A. D. Bethea '31. 

The Bookstore Scholarship — Established by the Davidson College Bookstore. 

The Class of 1 928 Scholarship — Established by gifts of class members. 

The Hill Parham Cooper and James C. Cooper, Jr. Scholarship — Established by 
Colonel J. C. Cooper and Mrs. George D. Finch. 

The Coslelt Scholarship — Established by Edward W. Coslett, Jr. 

The Craig-Huskc Scholarship — Established by the First Presbyterian Church of 
Reidsville, North Carolina. 

Davidson College Photography Scholarship — Provided by Ponder and Best, Inc., and 
the Southern California Photo Dealers Guild. 

Sara Clarkson Fowler Scholarship — Established by her husband, H. B. Fowler. 

Marie L. Rose Huguenot Scholarship — $1 ,000 is awarded each year by the Huguenot 
Society of America to a student descended from a Huguenot who settled in what is 
now the United States of America before Nov. 28, 1 787. Additional factors considered 
are scholarship, leadership potential, and financial need. 

Joseph Moore McConnell Scholarships — In memory of Dr. McConnell, Class of 1899. 
A distinguished educator and leader, he was a Davidson faculty member for 32 years, 
1 30 serving the last seven as Dean of the Faculty. 



W. A. Leiand McKeithen Scholarship — Established by family and friends. 

William A. Merchant Scholarships — Established by Mrs. William A. Merchant in 
memory of her husband.-.. 

Lemuel Edwin Messici< Scholarship — Established by a bequest from Mr. Messick. 

Isaac Raymond and Anne Withers Oeland Science Scholarship — Established by 
Raymond W. Oeland in memory of his aunt and uncle. Awarded to a rising sophomore 
science student who needs financial assistance. 

William G. Perry Scholarship — Established by a bequest from Mr. Perry. 

Robert F. Phifer Scholarship — Established by a bequest from Mr. Phifer. 

Walter Alan Richards Scholarship — Established by Mr. and Mrs. James W. Knox in 
memory of her father. 

A. H. Stone Scholarship — Established by his bequest, for students interested in the 
ministry. 

Oscar Julius Thies, Jr. Chemistry Scholarship — Honoring an alumnus and member 
of the college faculty from 1919 to 1964, this scholarship is awarded annually to a 
rising junior studying chemistry who gives promise of great usefulness. 

Alfred B. Young and Mary Elizabeth Young Scholarship — Established by a bequest 
from their daughter, Mary Erwin Young. 

STUDENT AID FUNDS 

Each of these named funds contributes about $500 annually to provide financial 
aid for Davidson students. 

The Alexander Fund — Established by The Reverend and Mrs. E. A. Alexander, also 
honoring Cornelius P. and Marjorie Jane Alexander. 

Neal Larkin Anderson — Established by Mr. and Mrs. Alan S. O'Neal. 

Virginia and William M. Baker — Established by a bequest from Mrs. Baker. 

James R. Boulware, Jr. — Established by a bequest from Mr. Boulware. 

Dr. J. R. and Mrs. Annette Judson Brown — Established by J. R. and W. C. Brown. 

Jefferson Davis — Established by Desiree L. Franklin in honor of that 19th century 
American leader. 

Professor John Leighton Douglas — Established by a bequest from his niece, Grace 
Douglas James. 

David Follett — Established by his wife, Helen Long Follett. 

Robert Hagood Gambrell — Established by his father, E. Smythe Grambrell. 

Dr. Frazer Hood -- Established by his wife, Kalista Wagner Hood, in memory of this 
long-time Davidson professor. 

J. Edward Johnston - Established by Mrs. Willis P. Johnston and Mrs. Fred J. Hay. 

Mary and John McGavock - Established by Professor W. G. McGavock and Mrs. 
W. E. Whittington. 

Dr. Hamilton Witherspoon McKay, Sr. — Established by a friend. 

The McPheeters Scholarship - Established by Mrs. Lois A. McPheeters. 

Henrietta Breese Melick ~ Established by George W. Melick. 

R. M. Miller, Jr. ~ Established by his bequest and in memory of his class of 1876. 

Dr. Samuel W. Moore — Established by family and friends. 

James Douglas Nisbet - Established by a bequest from Mrs. Beulah W. Nisbet. 

North Carolina National Bank Scholarship — Established by gifts from the Bank. 1 31 



Neal Scott — Established by family and friends. 

DeWitt Wallace - Established by DeWitt Wallace and E. H. Little. 

W. A. Wood - Established by John Marshall Knox. 

James Sprunt — Established by Dr. James Sprunt. 

Daniel Blain Woods and James Baker Woods ill — Established in memory of these 
brothers by family and friends. 

GENERAL STUDENT AID 

Over the years more than 170 other bequests and gifts, earmarked to help Davidson 
students receive an education, have built up a permanent fund from which additional 
student aid is derived annually. Named units honor the following: 

The Finley Family 

Robert E. Abell, Jr. George R. French 

W.D. Alexander H. E. Fulcher, Jr. 

Annie Phifer Allison William Arnett Gamble III 

John Phifer Allison J.F.Giimore 

R. W. Allison Herbert and Gertrude Halverstadt 

Thomas Payne Bagley C.E.Graham 

Sarah and Evelyn Bailey Potter A. Halyburton 

Holt Barnwell Howard Melville Hannah 

Norman King Barton E. H. and Mary R. Harding 

W. H. Belk Isaac Harris 

Charles H. Belvin S.J.Harris 

G.L.Bernhardt John H. Harrison 

J M Bernhardt io'^" Frederick Richards Hay 

The Blue Family iohn L. Henry 

Maggie Blue The Hicks-Faison Families 

George Bower The Hobbs-Yonan Families 

Elliott M. Braxton, Jr. The Hollingsworth Family , 

The Brookshire Family Julia M.Holt 

C.K.Brown David H. Howard, Jr. 

Rufus D.Brown George A. Hudson, Jr. 

T. J. Brown and J. M. Rogers May Anderson Hyslop 

Thomas Brown Henderson Irwin 

W. Frank Brown Joseph Cowan Irwin 

W.T.Brown J.F.Jackson 

J.J.Brunner Annie B. Jarvis 

Cannon-Borden Fund Charles W. Johnston 

The Carr Family (The Reverend) Frontis H. Johnston 

John S. Carson Ralph Balfour Johnston 

W. F.Carter The Knox-Johnstone Families 

Maxwell Chambers A. M. Kistler 

Class of 1893 H. P. King, jr. 

The Conklin Family J.M.Knox 

Helen M. Cooke R. H. Lafferty 

John M. Cooper Merle Dupuy Lingle 

Martin Phifer Crawford Katherine Livingston 

Daniel J. Currie, Sr. Herbert A. Love 

Daniel J. Currie, Jr. Conant S. Lyon 

A.B.Davidson Alexander McArthur 

Mary Springs Davidson Daniel and Margaret McBryde 

A. J. Davis M. H. McBryde 

D. A. Davis Brown and Kate Newell McCallum 

r! A. Dunn Mr. and Mrs. D. A. McCallum 

Mary Sampson Dupuy James McDowell 

John J. Eagan Robert Irwin McDowell 

The Eskridge Family A. R. McEachern 

Silas Ardrie Ewart Harriet S. Mcllwain 

132 David Fairley Neill McKay 



John W. McLaughlin 
Marianne Watt McLean 
Mary Jane McNair ^ 
John McSween 
Joseph Bingham Macl< 
Henry Winthrop Malloy 
(Colonel) W. J. Martin 
Francis Wharton Medearis 
James Edward Mills 
Jack T. Moore 
John Wilson and Margaret 

Gibbon Moore 
Thomas B. Moore 
C. M. Morris 

Marion and Milton Morris 
Robert Hall Morrison 
(Mrs.) N. T. Murphy 
William Murdock 
The Oates Family 
J. Bailey Owen 
Kate Parrott 

William S. and Rosa W. Patterson 
John L. Payne 
Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Phillips 
Jean Garretson Pittman 
A. K. Pool 
Melinda B. Ray 
Neil W. Ray 
R. P. Richardson 
W. J. Roddey 
Charles B. Ross, III 
F. Preston St. Clair 



The Schoenith Family 

M. E. Sentelle 

J. E. Sherrill 

Karl and Emma Sherrill 

William Marion Sikes 

E. B. Simpson 

Sterling Smith 

William H. Sprunt 

Lola E. Stone 

J.J. Summerell 

T. W. Swan 

J. D. Swinson 

Samuel McDowell Tate 

Frances Taylor 

W. B.and |. P. Taylor 

Oscar Julius Thies, Jr. 

The Turner Family 

Cassandra J. Vaughan 

John M. Vereen 

John H. West 

T. F.West 

W. A. West 

John Whitehead 

S. H.Wiley 

Josiah J. Willard 

George W. Williams 

Kate Williams 

L. Banks Williamson 

Sue Willis 

The Wilson and Barringer Families 

George E. Wilson, Sr. 

The Worth Family 

A. J. Yorke 

Robert Simonton Young 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



AWARDS 



Alumni Medal — Awarded annually by the Alumni Association to the freshman who 
has made the highest average of his or her class in one of the degree programs. 

Banks Bible Medal — Established in memory of the Reverend William Banks, former 
trustee and president of the trustees, a fund provides a medal given annually to the 
senior who has completed four years of Bible with the highest distinction. 

Vereen Bell Award -Vr\&r\6s and relatives of Vereen M, Bell, Class of 1932, have 
established a fund for a prize to be given annually to the student who submits the best 
piece of creative writing. 

Sandy Black Memorial Award — Established by Mrs. Sam Orr Black of Spartanburg, 
South Carolina, in memory of her first grandson, this award of at least $450 is presented 
annually to the rising senior premedical student considered most outstanding. In 
addition to a superior academic record, the student receiving the award shall have 
demonstrated traits of character, personality, leadership and unselfish service which 
give promise of an outstanding contribution in the field of medicine. 

Agnes Sentelle Brown /Iwarc/" Established by Dr. Mark Edgar Sentelle, professor and 
dean of students at Davidson College, and presented annually to some worthy student 
above the freshman class who will be selected for outstanding promise as indicated by 
character, personality, intellectual ability, and scholarship. 



133 



AWARDS The Jefferson Davis /4wc7/-<:y- Established by a friend of the college to honor the mem- 

ory of Jefferson Davis, the award will be presented annually to a deserving student in- 
terested in and excelling in the study of Constitutional Law. 

Department Of The Army Superior Cadet Award — Awarded annually by the 
Department of the Army to the outstanding cadet in each year's group of Military 
Science. Award is based upon scholastic excellence and demonstrated leadership 

ability. 

Gladstone Memorial Award — Established by the family and friends of George L. 
Gladstone, Jr., Class of 1960, this $200 award is made each year to a rising senior who 
has exhibited high potential for future service to man kind as indicated by leadership at 
Davidson and elsewhere, service to the college and community, and academic record. 

Greek Prize — Presented by the Class of 1922, books are given to the student who shows 
the greatest ability and promise in the study of Greek. It is not necessarily awarded 
annually. 

R. Windley Hall Fund — A freshman writing award, which also provides for a visiting 
lecturer on campus. 

Hay Bible Medal — The medal provided for by three sons in honor of their mother, 
Mrs. F. J. Hay, Sr., is awarded to the freshman who makes the highest grade in Bible in 
his or her freshman year. 

Howard Chemistry Award — Established by Mrs. David H. Howard of Lynchburg, 
Virginia, in memory of her son, this chemistry scholarship of $300 is awarded annually 
to a rising senior studying chemistry who gives promise of the largest degree of 
usefulness in some field of service which requires a knowledge of chemistry. 

The William G. McGavocI^ Mathematics /I wo rt/- Presented to the member of the Senior 
Class who has demonstrated the greatest promise and accomplishment in mathematics 
during his Davidson career, this award honors W. G. McGavock, Professor Emeritus of 
Mathematics. 

Phifer Economics Award — The A. K. Phifer Scholarship — awarded annually to an 
upperclassman who has made a distinguished record in the study of economics. 
Established by Mrs. A. K Phifer of Cleveland, North Carolina, the stipend is 
approximately $450 annually. 

Putnam Mathematics Award — The William Loyell Putnam Mathematical Competition 
Award, established by the Southeastern Section of the Mathematics Association of 
America, goes to the student who receives the highest rank on the Putnam 
Mathematical Examination in this region. 

Richard Ross Memorial Music Award — Given to a graduating senior music major who 
during four years of study has demonstrated the greatest achievement in the three 
areas for which Ross was known: musical artistry, academic excellence, and Christian 
character. 

William M. Scruggs Memorial Fellowship in Communications — provided by the family 
and friends of a Davidson graduate of 1949, this fellowship is awarded to an 
undergraduate who qualifies as a part-time intern in the field of communications with 
special reference to radio and television. 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award — In 1925 the New York Southern Society established 
at Davidson College and at several other selected institutions an award to be made 
annually in memory of its founder. Each year two medallions are presented, one to a 
member of the senior class and the other to a person outside the student body. These 
awards recognize fine spiritual qualities practically applied to daily living, and have 
usually gone to persons who have given unselfish service without due recognition. 



134 



ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

W. Olin Nisbet, Jr. Scholarship — A scholarship of approximately $1200 awarded to a 
football player who demonstrates the qualities of team spirit and devotion to the 
college demonstrated by the late W. Olin Nesbit, Jr., Class of 1928. 

Thomas D. Sparrow Scholarship — Established in memory of Dr. Thomas D. Sparrow of 
Charlotte, this scholarship of $500 goes annually to an outstanding member of the 
Davidson football team. 

C. T. Stowe Scholarship — Established by the S. P. Stowe, Sr., Foundation, this 
scholarship of approximately $450 per year goes annually to a promising athlete who is 
a student of better than average scholastic ability and whose conduct and attitudes are 
in keeping with the Davidson tradition. 

May Ervin Wall Scholarship — A scholarship of at least $300 awarded annually to a 
Davidson football player selected by the head coach. 

"D" Club — The outstanding freshman athlete of the year. 

Tommy Peters Memorial — The student who best exemplifies the Davidson spirit in 
intercollegiate athletic competition. 

Thomas D. Sparrow Award — Presented in recognition of outstanding dedication and 
contribution to intercollegiate athletics. 

Baseball Fielding Clark— Most valuable player. 

Rick Smyre— The player who demonstrates the most "hustle." 

Basketball 

John Belk— Most valuable player. 

Dr. Robert M. McLeod— Best defensive player. 

Vernon Nelson Memorial-To a basketball player who puts forth unusual effort, hustle, 

and leadership to help achieve for Davidson a national basketball championship. The 

recipient's career interest is business and he never quits, regardless of the odds against 

success. 

Football 

J. C. and Frances B. Fuller Memorial— Given by James Fuller, Class of 1965, in memory 

of his parents. 

George M. King — The varsity football player who best combines outstanding play on 

the football field and academic excellence. 

Fd Armfield — Best varsity blocker. 

D. R. LaFar — Best defensive player. 

Golf Figin White — Most valuable player. 

Swimming 

Bill Ray — Student makingthehighest number of points in intercollegiate competition. 
Dick Redding — Most valuable team man. 

Tennis 

Harry Fogleman — The varsity tennis player who exemplifies those qualities fostered by 
Coach Harry Fogleman. 

Track 

The Fred Borch Cross Country Award— To recognize the cross country runner who has 
made the most positive contribution to the team and has shown the most positive im- 
provement in his own running. 
R. A. Fetzer — Excellence. 

William A. Merchant III— The student making the highest number of points in 
intercollegiate track competition. '135 



HONORARIES Pl^i Beta Kappa~Jhe Davidson College Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa received its charter 

as Gamma of North Carolina from the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa on March 
1 , 1 923. Phi Beta Kappa, established nationally in 1776 at the College of William and 
Mary, is the oldest of the American Greek letter societies. Election to membership in 
Phi Beta Kappa is the highest recognition of excellence in scholarship that an under- 
graduate can achieve in the United States. During the more than fifty years of its 
existence at Davidson, Phi Beta Kappa has elected more than 800 students to member- 
ship in course. Students at Davidson who maintain a general average of 3.6 or above on 
courses counted by Phi Beta Kappa are ordinarily considered for election, which is by 
ballot of faculty members of Phi Beta Kappa. Election to membership, however,is not 
automatic on the attainment of a certain grade average. In accordance with the Con- 
stitution of the United Chapters, students elected to membership must have qualifica- 
tions of "high scholarship, liberal culture, and good character." Not more than twelve 
and one-half percent of the senior class may be elected. Elections are held during the 
spring term and at commencement. 

Omicron Delta Kappa — This national leadership society recognizes eminence in five 
phases of campus life: scholarship, athletics, social and religious activities, 
publications, and forensic, dramatics, music, and other cultural activities. O.D.K. has 
three purposes: (1) to recognize persons who have attained a high standard of 
efficiency in college and collegiate activities, and to inspire others to strive for 
conspicuous attainments along similar lines; (2) to bring together the most 
representative men and women in all phases of collegiate life and thus to mold the 
sentiment of the institution on questions of local and intercollegiate interest; and (3) 
to bring together members of the faculty and student body on a basis of mutual 
interest and understanding. 

Omicron Delta Epsilon — The economics honorary society has as its objective the 
promotion of scholarly achievement in economics, fellowship among those in the 
profession, and understanding of key economic issues and problems. 

Phi Eta Sigma — Recognizing outstanding scholastic achievement during the freshman 
year. Phi Eta Sigma is a national honorary freshman society for men and women. 

Alpha Epsilon Delta — The Davidson chapter of this national honorary premedical 
fraternity is North Carolina Alpha. 

Alpha Phi Omega — This national service fraternity is composed of students who wish 
to carry through college days the ideal of service to college, community, and nation. 

Alpha Psi Omega — A national honorary dramatics fraternity restricted to juniors and 
seniors who have demonstrated a particular interest in theater through participation 
in the college drama program. 

Delta Sigma Rho — Tau Kappa Alpha — A national honorary forensic fraternity 
recognizing excellence in academic achievement, debating, and public speaking. 

Camma Sigma Epsilon — A national fraternity recognizing excellence in chemistry. The 
chapter at Davidson, founded in 1919, is the mother chapter. 

Scabbard and Blade — A national military honor society designed to recognize 
excellence in the study of military affairs and to promote interest in military education. 
Lifetime membership is by election as an outstanding ROTC student in the junior or 
senior year. The Davidson chapter, B Company, 5th Regiment, has been in continuous 
existence since 1923. 

Sigma Delta Psi — An honorary athletic fraternity open to all students who can perform 
all of 14 prescribed athletic feats. 

] 35 Sigma Pi Sigma— The national Physics Honor Society. Founded in 1921, the chapter at 

Davidson is the mother chapter. 



SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS 



Charles F. Myers Burlington Scholars 

William David Isenhower, Jr., 1980 
Andrew Thompson Miller, 1980 

Charles A. Dana Scholars 

Anne Bolick Abernethy, 1978 

Harry Lewis Albert, |r., 1977 

Ernest Alan Alig, 1977 

Pat McKinney Baskin, Jr., 1977 

Richard John Blinkhorn, Jr., 1978 

Walter Eugene Broadhead, 1977 

Dorothy Carol Brong, 1979 

Roger Henry Brown, Jr., 1978 

Laurie Schnackenberg Bumgarner, 1977 

Steven Paul Cuffe, 1978 

Susan Eileen Cunningham, 1977 

Wendy Lee Donahoe, 1977 

Richard Dana Ehrhart, 1977 

Edwin Louis Ferren, 1978 

Karl Edmund Goodhouse, 1977 

Holmes Plexico Harden, 1978 

Margaret Ann Hess, 1977 

Elizabeth Ann Holmes, 1979 

Calvin Rudolph Howell, 1978 

Clarence Foster Jennings, Jr., 1978 

Richard Hunter Jennings, III, 1977 

Mark Andrews Jester, 1977 

Mary Lynne Keener, 1977 

Stephen Robert Keener, 1977 



Virginia Carolyn Linder, 1978 
Cynthia Lee Maag, 1978 
Peyton Jaquelin Marshall, III, 1977 
Ruth Carter Murphey, 1977 
Sherry Grace Nataie, 1978 
Harry Spero Pappas, 1977 
Maria Monica Patterson, 1979 
Susan Prescott Reid, 1977 
Alan Ernest Rockett, 1977 
Thomas Orland Ruby, 1979 
Jon Todd Sahlroot, 1977 
Stephen Edward Sellers, 1979 
Robert Graham Shearer, 1977 
Hayden Judson Silver, III, 1978 
Stephen Jerome Smith, 1978 
Robert Anthony Snow, 1977 
Wayland Chad Stephens, 1977 
David Knox Tinkler, 1978 
Torrence John Trout, Jr., 1 979 
Audrey Marie Urbano, 1978 
Samuel Gamble Weir, III, 1 978 
Melody Wilder, 1979 
Van Elizabeth Williamson, 1977 



Joseph Moore McConnell Scholars 

Debra Marguerite Bass, 1979 
Thomas Edward Cooper, 1977 
Dana Leigh English, 1977 
Samuel James Ervin, IV, 1978 
Mark Stork George, 1980 
Robert Umstead Grizzard, 1977 
John Marshall Highsmith, 1980 
Barbara Ivey Kissam, 1978 

Samuel H. Bell Scholars 

Mark Alan Brooks, 1979 
Pamela Gertrud Camerra, 1 980 
Margaret Frances Campbell, 1978 
Brian Scott Cooper, 1978 
John O'Neal Craig, III, 1978 
Steven George Hull, 1979 
Edwin Patrick Jenevein, III, 1980 
Steven George Justus, 1978 
Bruce Edward Lantelme, 1979 
Carole Adele Loftin, 1980 
Carol Kathleen Long, 1980 
Donald Way Lupo, 1978 



Charles Elliott Law, 1978 
Santford Frank Martin, 1978 
Margaret Anne Noel, 1979 
Thomas Jay Overton, 1 979 
Ellen Renee Stebbins, 1979 
Elizabeth Carlisle Thomas, 1980 
Carol Elizabeth Watkins, 1977 



Burkley Mann, 1980 
Harrison Leroy Marshall, |r., 1979 
Cynthia Lee Newberry, 1978 
Suzanne Blanche Newberry, 1980 
Deborah Jean Oehler, 1980 
Terri Lynn Peat, 1 977 
Wilkins Carter Poe, 1979 
Mark Young Tyndall, 1979 
Frederick Harold Weber, 1979 
Victoria Winfield Wilkerson, 1980 
Ifor Ranis Williams, 1980 
Steven Henry Yood, 1980 



137 




Stella and Charles Guttman Scholars 

Michael Clayton Daisley, 1978 
Debra Susanne Dillon, 1978 
Andrew Allison McElwee, Jr., 1977 

Grier Martin Scholars 

Richard Daniel McNeely, 1980 
James Glenn Nichols, 1977 

Lunsford Richardson Honor Scholars 

William Bryan Andrews, 1977 
Jane Louise Childs, 1978 
Cynthia Rowe Doran, 1978 
Gwendolyn Elizabeth Dotts, 1980 
Peter Louis Durham, 1978 
Samuel Curtis Elliott, III, 1980 
Peter Lincoln Ely, 1980 
Michael Evan Garfinkel, 1980 
William James Haynes, II, 1980 
Thomas Dag Horn, 1978 
William Savage Hutchings, II, 1978 
Katherine Aycock McLendon, 1977 



Barbara Lynn Payne, 1978 
James Andrew Walker, 1 977 



Thomas Charles Mahoney, 1 980 
Jeffrey Cone Metzel, 1978 
Colleen Ann Parks, 1977 
Kenneth Thomas Patterson, 1979 
Leea Marie Pittenger, 1979 
David Jeffrey Rawlings, 1979 
Carol Susan Robinson, 1980 
David Luther Sappenfield, 1980 
Sara Ellen Stoneburner, 1980 
James Allan Stuckey, 1980 
Beth Ann Thacker, 1980 
Guyton Joel Winker, 1980 



Dr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Staley Scholars 



138 



James Philip Ashmore, 1980 
James Emory Baldwin, 1977 
Thomas Lee Bessellieu, 1 979 
Harry Spero Pappas, 1977 

Edward C. Stuart Scholar 

James Glenn Nichols, 1977 

W. M. and W. T. Thompson Scholars 

Richard Nelson Boyce, 1977 
Bonnie Ann Caulkins, 1977 
Bertis Edwin Downs, IV, 1 978 
Frances Elizabeth DuBose, 1979 
Anne James Ficklen, 1978 
Sylvia Elena Gordon, 1980 
Nathanael Randolph Harrison, 1977 



Cynthia Gail Payseur, 1980 
Randy Norris Sherrill, 1978 
William Stillwell Vincent, Jr., 1979 



John Richard Hobson, Jr., 1979 
David Louis Kelly, 1978 
Andrew Allison McElwee, Jr., 1977 
Thomas Orland Ruby, 1979 
Melody Wilder, 1979 
Hunter Earl Woodall, 1979 



Special Scholarships and Awards 

Richard John Blinkhorn, Jr., 1978 — Oscar Julius Thies, Jr., Chemistry Award 
Walter Eugene Broadhead, 1977 — Sandy Black Scholarship 
Melinda Ann Byrd, 1 977 — Jefferson Davis Award 

Carolann Connor, 1977 — George L. Gladstone, Jr. Memorial Scholarship 
Thomas Edward Cooper, 1 977 — A. K. Phifer Scholarship 
Richard Dana Ehrhart, 1977 - A. K. Phifer Scholarship 
William Stacy Johnson, J r., 1978 — Scruggs Fellowship 
Richard Sigmon Kelly, 1978 — Photography Scholarship 
(Jesse Thomas Lee, III, 1 977 — David H albert Howard, Jr. Chemistry Award 
Peyton Jaquelin Marshall, III, 1977 — A. K. Phifer Scholarship 
Ruth Carter Murphey, 1 977 - Sandy Black Scholarship 
James Glenn Nichols, 1977 — C. T. Stowe Scholarship 
Robert Harriss Whitaker, Jr., 1977 — Agnes Sentelle Brown Award 
Angela Jane Wier, 1978 — Presser Music Scholarship 
John Taylor Lewis Williams, 1 979 — Oeland Science Scholarship 



SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS 



National Merit Scholars 

Bruce Edwin Fielden, 1979 
Karen Sue Gilbert, 1979 
John Michael Golden, Jr., 1977 
Joseph Carter Hicks, III, 1979 
.Carol Kathleen Long, 1980 
Nancy Lynn McNair, 1980 
Elinore Dorothy Marsh, 1978 
David Rian Martin, Jr., 1980 
Michael Curtis Monger, 1980 



Madelon Jean Parks, 1977 
Maria Monica Patterson, 1979 
Paul Christian Schleifer, 1978 
Hayden Judson Silver, III, 1978 
Stephen Jerome Smith, 1978 
Jerry Lee Suttles, 1978 
Edwin Grant Wilkins, 1977 
Ifor Ranis Williams, 1980 
Frances Kay Worthy, 1978 



National Achievement Scholar 

Benita Franklin, 1979 



:ROTC Scholarship Cadets 

iGregg Thomas Anders, 1 977 
David Craven Beard, 1979 
Raymond Edmund Berberick, 
Charles Arnold Bobertz, 1980 
Timothy Alan Bonsack, 1979 
Brenda Marie Boyle, 1979 
Judkins Mathews Bryan, 1978 
Robert Douglas Carter, Jr., 1979 
Jeffrey Brothers Clark, 1978 
Edward Michael Crosland, 1977 
William Henry Davis, 1978 
Richard Earl Fay, 1978 
John Russell Folger, III, 1979 
Curtis Donald Goho, Jr., 1977 
Harry Augustus Griffith, !ll, 1980 
William James Haynes, II, 1980 
Matthew Brooke Home, 1978 
William David Isenhower, Jr., 1980 
Walter Clyde Joyce, Jr., 1977 
Myles Andrew MacDonald, 1979 



Victor Maurice McMillan, 1977 
Harrison Leroy Marshall, Jr., 1979 
1979 David Rian Martin, Jr., 1980 

Robert Russell Martin, 1979 
Robert MacFarlane Mayer, 1977 
David Quinn Mohan, 1980 
George Bryan Murdaugh, 1980 
Michael Anthony Pannier, 1980 
Charles Michael Patterson, 1 977 
Alan Douglas Rak, 1980 
Oliver Wendell Ramsey, 1977 
Charles Fenton Rice, III, 1977 
Banks Stacy Robinson, |r., 1978 
Clyde Raymond Roy, II, 1978 
Mark William Scandling, 1977 
Wayne Christopher Stuart, 1978 
Landon Carrington Thompson, 1979 
James Grier Wall, 1978 
Thomas Freeman White, 1977 
Mark Wilson Yow,1977 



139 



THE CLASS OF 1976 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



140 



Gary Lee Aston 
Dorothy Grace Austin 
Mitchell Wayne Baucom 
Stephen Stuart Bell 
*Donald Walter Benson 
Thomas Joseph Blackwood, 1 
Charles Michael Blanchard 
William Chramer Bond, Jr. 
Cornelius Anthony Boon, Jr. 
Frederic Louis Borch, 111 
Byron Keith Bowen 
Jennifer Lynn Brothers 
Kenneth Jene Bumgarner 
Lorna Elizabeth Carter 
David DeWitt Cellon 
Andy Martin Chance 
Jesse William Chappell, Jr. 
William Smith Coleman, Jr. 
Kirk Clayton Combe 
David Robert Cormak 
Charles Rory Crawford 
James Hassell Davis 
John Scott Davis 
*Mark William Deaton 
James Arthur DeVille, 11 
David Warren Dickey 
Jeffrey Roland Diller 
Robert Franklin Doares, Jr. 
Robert Daniel Douglass 
Joseph Meacham Duncan, Jr. 
Mark Butler Felker 
Hugh Dalsen Ferbert 
Forrest William Flaniken, Jr. 
Stephen Marven Flowers 
J. Henry Smith Foushee, 111 
David Lyles Francis 
Thomas Clifford Gardiner 
Jeffrey Lewis George 
Michael Gray Gibson 
Peter Elliott Goodman 
David Christopher Gordon 
John Broadus Green 
James Claud Guin, III 
*John Berry Guthrie, III 
Thomas Richard Hagood, Jr. 
Michael Dennis Hall 
Franklin Shuford Hancock 
Larry D. Hardaway 
Derry Harper 
Benjamin Culver Hedrick 
Arthur Eric Hendrix 
Walter Gary Herin, Jr. 
Jefferv Lynn Heslop 
Ralph Bernard Holloway, )r. 



Timothy Henry Hose 
James Randal Hunter 

Honors in History 
Karen Patrice Husted. 
Paul Russell Irwin 
Felix Paul Japp, 111 
Gary Flynn Jarrell 
Logan Carroll Jones 
Clyde David Kirby 
Milford Kendrick Kirby 

Honors in History 
David Cameron Kitchin 
Thomas Russell Knauss 
Robert Cliffe Knechtle 
James Koloditch 
Terrance Scott Lane 
Harry Neal Lenhoff 

Honors in Economics 
Edward Russell Lindsey 
William Lee Lloyd 
Charles Scott Logan 
George Malcolm Loy 
Robert Alexander McDaniel, |r. 
Richardson Bricken McKenzie, I 
William Charles McKinley, Jr. 
Robert Oren McKnight 
William Tally Manson, 111 
*Frazier Wyatt Marsh '' 

John Catlett Martin, 11 
Richard Albert Martorell, Jr. 
Addison Gary Steed Masengill 
David Simpson Melton 
Robert Lee Mendenhall 
Donald Fred Immanuel Meng 
John Allen Mitchell, 111 
Robert Edwin Mooty 
*John Warner Munce 
Ray Donavon Munford, Jr. 
James Steven Muse 
Charles Rogers Neal 
Jeffrey Alden Neikirk 
*Charles Earl Palmer, Jr. 
Michael Steve Pappas 
Sheldon Kendrew Parker 
Wyndell Stanley Patterson 
Harold Eugene Peacock, Jr. 
Anne Lee Pelfrey 
Carl Christopher Perkins 
Jay Robert Powell 
Ronald McMillan Powell 
Joel Scott Pressley 
Richard Zachary Price 
Prescott Lee Prince 
Edwin Allen Proctor, J r. 



"Mitchell Wall Reaves 
William Preston Reed, jr. 
Scott Duncan Reid 
David Sherman Richardson 
Alice Hornsby Rogers 
Willard Goley Ross 
Robert Frank Rovegno 
Richard Gary Roylance 
Robert Daniel Sanders, Jr. 
Michael Perry Sauer 
lAllen Carnaby Schaberg 
Carl Clinton Schwartz 
John Carlylc Sherrill, III 
Robert Edward Sibley, Jr. 
Robert Calvin Skaggs, jr. 
David Jerome Smith 
William Layton Smith, Jr. 

Honors in History 
Renee Weisner Soos 
James Westbrooke Spears 
John Vernon Stanfield 
Stephen Lawrence Stec 
Michael Alan Stick 
Mitchell Walter Stone 
' Robert Lee Stowe, III 



August Kohn Strasburger 
Bradley Dean Swalwell 
John May Tatum, III 
Ralph Blalock Taylor 
Aubrey Flowers Tims 
Scott Edwin Tinnon 
Lawrence Steven Urbon 
James David Vail, IV 
William josephus Vaughan, Jr. 
Steven Lenz Vitek 
Kevin Douglas Walsh 
William Preston West, Jr. 
Roger Lindsay Whitley 
Bruce Evan Wicker 

Honors in English 
Milton Gordon Widenhouse, Jr. 

Honors in Political Science 
*Mark Steven Wilkensky 
David Bruce Wiley 
Carol Marie Willingham 
Edward Lee Willingham, IV 
George Leman Wilson, Jr. 
John Knox Wilson, Jr. 
Ross McGowan Wright 
Edward Chacey Yeaton 

*Center for Honors Studies 



THE CLASS OF 1976 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Robert Woodward Bailey 
Phil Louis Barringer, jr. 
Charles Darnell Bethea 
David James Bowman 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Richard Eugene Campbell 
Robert Blayne Canning, Jr. 
Malcolm Augustus Cline 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Paul Steven Collins 
James Dean Copple 
William Alexander Crosland, Jr. 
Frank David Dale, Jr. 
Millard Hilton Dean, jr. 
John Charles Doscher 
John Frederick Dunn 
James Shelton Ellis, jr. 
Mary Elizabeth Farmer 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Danny Steven Felts 
Thomas Milburn Gopsill, VII 
David Patrick Green 
Robert Steven Harshman 
William Buchanan Hawk 
Edward Gray Hill, jr. 



Dallas Alan Kirkendol 
Douglas Chapin McElfresh 
Mark Alan Malcolm 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
David joe Mayberry 
William Emerson Morrison, jr. 
Iheanyi Xtian Okoli 
Thomas Pierson Sherwood Oliver 
Steven Griffin Patterson 
Robert Allan Putnam 
Eppa Rixey, IV 

Stephen Sergeant Garrett Robb 
Fred Shaune Robertson 
Martha Winston Royster 
Stephen Krome Scroggs 
Bradford Neil Sebastian 
Jesse Cummins Smith 
James Edmond Stephenson 
Gary Wilkinson Stewart 
Emelia Dean Stuart 
John Adams Taylor 
Leslie Lancaster Taylor, III 
Anthony Morris Thomason 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Joseph Loretz Thompson 



141 



THE CLASS OF 1976 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE, continued 



Thomas Douglas Traver 
Max Jean Turner, Jr. 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
John Irving Upshur 
Thomas Leon Venable 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 



Charles Robert Weber 
Bruce Randolph West 
William Winkenwerder, Jr. 
Thomas Edward Wood 
James Jackson Wynn 
John Cornelius Yeoman, Jr. 



HONOR GRADUATES 



142 



Cum Laude 

*John Edward Alexander, B.S. 
James Gudger Baker, Jr., A.B. 
John Alexander Barbour, A.B. 
William Alan Beasley, A.B. 
Mary Lyon Booth, A.B. 
William A. Cole, jr., B.S. 
Bruce Clayton Corser, A.B. 
Horace Rainsford Drew, III, B.S. 
Alan William Duncan, A.B. 

Honors in History 
Douglas William Ey, Jr., A.B. 

Honors in History 
Mark Robert Firth, B.S. 
Tompkins Augustus Foster, A.B. 
Ernest Henry Glenn, A.B. 

High Honors in English 
Robert William Hoag, A.B. 
Robert Hauton Husbands, A.B. 
James Roger Jackson, Jr., B.S. 
Robert Keith Johnson, A.B. 
David Neil Kirkman, A.B. 

Honors in History 
Andrew Theodore Lamas, A.B. 

Honors in Political Science 
William Allen Link, A.B. 

Honors in History 
Larry Thomas Mimms, B.S. 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Jonathan Beck Monroe, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Pope Lloyd Moseley, IV, B.S. 
Robert Elliott Penny, III, A.B. 

Honors in Psychology 
Jonathan Scott Perry, B.S. 
David Winfield Rowe 

Honors in Psychology 



Kenneth Edwin Schmader, B.S. 
Bradley Richard Seawall, A.B. 
Melvin Daniel Smith, A.B. 
Cosby Swanson, III, B.S. 
Daniel Barrett Thorp, A.B. 
Paul Brown Welch, III, A.B. 
Bryan Hadley Wilson, B.S. 
Andrew Chung-lap Wong, B.S. 

Special Attainments in Chemistry 
Basil Otto Yost, III, B.S. ' 



Magna Cum Laude 

Peter Francis Clark, A.B. 

Honors in History 
*John Granger Cook, A.B. 
*Martin Daniel Lakes, A.B. 
Michael Faulkner Eubanks, A.B. 
David Robert Little, A.B. 
David LaFar Moore, Jr., A.B. 
Banks Ashby Peacock, A.B. 
Jeffrey Neil Plowman, A.B. 

Honors in English 
Mark Herbert Postove, B.S. 
Joseph Raphael Rohrer, B.S. 
Rand Washburn Sommer, B.S. 
Charles Richard Stewart, A.B. 
Joel Randall Tew, A.B. 

Honors in Economics 

FIRST HONOR 
Richard Clair Williams, Jr., A.B. 

SECOND HONOR 

* Center for Honors Studies 



THE CLASS OF 1976 



1976 SUMMER GRADUATES 



Norman Edmund Atkins, A.B. 

Susan Elizabeth Brown, A.B. Cum Laude 

John William Carter, Jr., A.B. 

William Howard Davis, A.B. 

Merl McDonald Ferguson, Jr., B.S. 

Hugh Linwood Hennis, III, B.S. Cum Laude 

Frederick Bradley Jenny, A.B. 

Dale Rae Mead, A.B. 

Donna Diane Sherrill, B.S. 

Jim Farthing Sneed, B.S. 

Thomas Patrick Verlin, A.B. 

Rollie Howard White, III, A.B. 



HONORARY DEGREES 



Paul Hibbert Clyde — Doctor of Letters 
Theodore Martin Hesburgh — Doctor of Laws 
William Frederick Mulliss — Doctor of Laws 
Arnold Black Rhodes — Doctor of Divinity 




143 



THE STUDENT BODY 

GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 



ENROLLMENT 



Alabama 35 

Arizona 1 

Arkansas 2 

California 6 

Colorado 3 

Connecticut 18 

Delaware 9 

District of Columbia 1 

Florida 114 

Georgia 183 

Idaho 1 

.llinois 10 

Indiana 6 

Kansas - 3 

Kentucky 16 

Louisiana . . 7 

Maine 1 

Maryland 31 

Massachusetts. 4 

Michigan 8 

Minnesota 1 

Mississippi . . 2 

Missouri 5 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire 2 

New Jersey 50 

New York 41 

North Carolina 440 

Ohio 25 



Pennsylvania 35 

Rhode island 1 

South Carolina 88 

South Dakota 1 

Tennessee 35 

Texas 26 

Virginia 105 

Washington - 1 

West Virginia 15 

Wisconsin 1 

Australia 1 

Brazil 1 

Canal Zone i 

England 2 

France 2 

Hong Kong 2 

India 1 

Japan 1 

Korea 1 

Mexica 1 

The Netherlands 1 

Puerto Rico 1 

Saudia Arabia 1 

Singapore 1 

Spain 1 

Sweden 1 

West Germany . . . . v 1 

West Malaysia 1 

Zaire 1 

TOTAL 1356 



Males 



Females 



Total 



On-Campus Enrollment by Class: 

Freshmen 266 

Sophomores 243 

Juniors 200 

Seniors 226 

Off-Campus Enrollment: 

Career/Service 4 

D. C. Students in England 1 

D. C. Students in Marburg 5 

Transients in Marburg 

D. C. Students in Montpellier 9 

Transients in Montpellier 1 

Unclassified Enrollment: 

Internationa] Students 7 

Special Students 



117 


383 


106 


349 


70 


270 


72 


298 



365 

2 
1 
5 
2 
7 
6 

2 

4 



1 300 

6 

2 
10 

2 

16 
7 

9 

4 



144 



962 



394 



1356 



STUDENT BODY 

by zip code 

STAHMAKK, JOYCE C BOX 313? TOWN HAL.L AUSTRALIA 

TOOWOOMBA 
GORDON, SYLv'lA ELENA CP509 BRAZIL 

79.800 DOURADOSi MT. 
GILSON, FRANCOISE H RUE DES SAVOIES FRANCE 

74 ANNEMASSE 
PONT> MIREILLE -ST HILAIRE DE 30 FRANCE 

BREThMAS 
B0C<, MANFRED HEL1UT DAMASCHKEWEG 33 WEST GERMANY 

aSSlARBuRG/HESSEN BR 
BARnES, WILLIAM JR ESSO H3E VICTORIA ST ENGLAND 

LONDON SWIE 5jw 
DOlG> ANDREW JOHN DANE END HAWKES LN ENGLAND 

NORWICH NORFOLK 
TCNg> CHEE-HUNG R 618 NATHAN RD 19/1 HONGKONG 

KOWLODN 
w0Nb> FAI VUCCa DE LAC HONG KONG 

MALlUSHUl SHATIN NT 
BHATTAL, JASJIT S 50/AnANDlDK COLONY NEW DELHI INDIA 
NIShIMJRa/ HIROSHI N0DA-2-2*-12 JAPAN 

FU<USHIMA-<U 0S«KA55 
MOORE/ WILLIAM LLOYD PRE5BY MISSION TAEJON KOREA 

133 O-JUNG DONG 

englE/ Thomas scott ? o box 3i ciss west Malaysia 

PETAtiNG JAYA SELANG 

PHlLLlPSi SCOTT APT 142 MEXICO 

SABINAS COaH 

CASTELElNy ALLARD LANDRELAAN 7 THE NETHERLANDS 

TERDaM 3013 

MORRISCNj RCBERT C JR DRAWER 201* CANAL ZONE 

BALBOA 

aRNCLD> JOHN ANTHONY P BX 2023 RIYADH SAUDIA ARABIA 

KINGDOM OF 

PEREZ/ ANDRES LABRADOR 15 MADIRD S°AIN 

CONmEK/ THOMAS S MORAVAGEN 25 SWEDEN 

161'.2 BROMMA 

BANGC/ EMMANUEL MAISON BANDARI DAVIDSON NC 

MUMBY> FDkARC 1 GOODWOOD HILL REP OF SINGAPORE 

SINGAPORE 
C0927 MCMuRRAY, PATRICIA LYNN 9 ESmERaLDA/ BUCARE 
02025 FCT-l-ENGER/ DAVID ^ III 38 RUSTIC DR 
02025 wCODSi ANNE ADAMS 231 JERUSALEM RD 
C2045 5ERBERICK/ RAYMOND E JR 712 NANTASKET AVE 
C2181 DCRaN/ CYNTHlA ROWE HZ BAY vIEW RD 
C292C COLEMAN,- JANET ROBIN 9i FREEDOM DRIVE 
03264 NATalE/ SHERRY GRACE 27 LANGCON ST 
C37b6 MELENDY, mark E HILLCREST ACRES 

04S01 SHEeDY, JAMES WADE SO WESTERN AVE 
06001 GRIER/ EDWARD B 111 145 DEERClIFF RD 
06C58 SATmERLIE/ LYNN ANNE LAUREL WAY 
C6Q95 ANDREWS, ALLISON w 12 FYuER DRIVE 
061C7 GILLlAf, MARY ELIZABETH 31 LEMAY STREET 
06480 STEWART/ KEVIN R MAFlE ROAD 

06492 PEDcrSEN/ SVEnO ERIC 1524 TUTTLE AVE 
06497 BAIrD/ ELIZABETH ANNE 58 VICTORIA LANE 
C6611 VINSON, h'lLLlAM D JR 30 RED BARN RD 
Ob759 GOOdhOUSE/ KARL E MILTQN ROAD 

06762 ShiRK/ JOEL ELLIOTT STEINMANN AVE 
06810 SwEeT/ RDBEPT PRESCOTT 19 CONNECTICUT AVE 
06820 rCSHER/ THOMAS LESLIE 32 EDQERTON ST 
06630 dCSlET/ CHRISTOPHER P 89 VALLEY DR 
06840 JEALOUS/ SCOTT C 11 BETSYS LANE NEW CANAAN CT -145 



RiO PIEDRAS 


PR 


COHASSET 


MA 


COhASSET 


MA 


HULL 


MA 


wElLESLEY 


MA 


CRANSTON 


RI 


Plymouth 


NH 


LEBANON 


NH 


WATERVILLE 


ME 


AVON 


CT 


NORFOLK 


CT 


WINDSOR 


CT 


WEST HARTFORD 


CT 


PORTLAND 


CT 


WALLINGFORD 


CT 


STRATFORD 


CT 


TRUMBULL 


CT 


LITCHFIELD 


CT 


MIDDLEBURY 


CT 


DANBURY 


CT 


DARIEN 


CT 


GREENWICH 


CT 


NEW CANAAN 


CT 



STUDENT BODY 

06840 jOH^SONi PETER BRADFORD. 27D JONATHAN RD Ul'^ CANAAN CT 

06S4C JOHNSTON, DOUGLAS F JR HZ RIVER wIND RC NEW CANAAN CT 

0b&77 BROOKS.. MARK ALAN 168 TACkORA TRAIL RIDGEFIELD CT 

06878 GJEf?SVlK/ ERiCA AENNE 54 fiARY LANE RIVERSIDE CT 

0bg80 kILsOn^ CARRIE E 10 «UTJMly RIDGE wESTON CT 

C7006 CA^ELLA, FRANK MARK 50 OalEwOOD RD V, CALDWELL NJ 

07006 DORaN^ MICHAEL 2t SJNSeT DRIVE N CALDWELL Nj 

07006 MCElkEE., ANDREW A JR 6 BRCOKSlDE TERR N C^LDwELl NJ 

07006 SMITH/ BEVERLY JEAN :7 FaIRvIEW DRIvE NORTH CALDWELL NJ 

07016 MCOuADE, ROBERT DwYER 22 CONNECTICUT ST CRANFORD NJ 

07025 wATsoN/ PETER DAVID 27 appleTCN PLACE GLEN RIDGE NJ 

07C32 GARfIN<El/ MICHAEL EVAN 58 LIVINGSTON AVE KEaRNY NJ 

07032 wHItE/ KEVIN MICHAEL 20 AlPInE PlACE KEaRNY NJ 

07039 SaNfilippC, ANThONV j i^ WYNN£W00D RD LIVINGSTON Nj 

070*6 REW, DAVID REID 208 BOULEVARD MT LAKES NJ 

C7052 UCBlE> JaSCN GREGORY lOO wARREN ROAD WEST ORANGE Nj 

07060 PCLGLASE, ROBERT FERRIS 5 U^PER V.ARREN WAY WARREN Nj 

0707S FERRaRO, JOSEPH EDMJND 35* S ORANGE AVE S ORANGE NJ 

0742t GEROY, JOHN ROBERT ICl SECOND AVE LITTLE FALLS NJ 

07446 FaRcaND/ MERRILL R JR 11 KIMBERLY CT RAMSEY NJ 

07446 KING/ GEORGE T 81 noRMaN DR RAMSEY NJ 

07''S1 MEANSi STEVEN J 416 WEYMOUTH DR WYCLIFF NJ 

C7601 SCHlCTTERBECK., KARL A 425 CRESTwOOD AVE HACKENSACK NJ 

07605 CCLLlNSi MARGARET E 105 PALMER PL LEONIa' NJ 

07656 SCUlE.. WaRREN JOHN 122 FREMONT AVE =ARK RIOGE NJ 

C767C SWAKSDN/ JOHN P jR 10 G^ENwOOD ROAD TENAFlY NJ 

07675 SLOveR/ ROBERT ALFRED 131 SECOND AVENUE WESTWOOD NJ 

07712 paPpaYlIOU/ THEODORE S el9 BRIDLEMERE AVE INTERlAKEN nj 

07801 SMITH/ EDWARD JAY 7 NEREWOOC RD DCVER NJ 

07866 JACkCWItz, MARC ALLAN 22 OMAHa AVE ROCKAhAY Nj 

07876 CaPl'TO/ DIANA TERESA S JiLL TERRACE SUCCASUNNA NJ 

07560 CHADWICK/ KENNETH E JOCKEY hOLLOw RD MORRISTOwN nj 

0796C CLlPt^ORC/ PETER Q BlJE MILL RD MORRISTOWN NJ 

C7961 FCErSTER. mark R 16 BENNINGTON RD CONVENT ST Nj 

07974 HALE^/ WILLIAM J HI 77 CENTRAL AVE NEx PROVIDENCE NJ 

08033 EAStwICKj THEODORE T 150 CHEWS LANDING RD hADDONF^ElD NJ 

06C33 FERrEN/ donna lee 33: KNOLL TOP LN HADDOnFIELD NJ 

08033 FERPEN/ eDkIN l 331 KNOlL TOP LN HADDONFIELD NJ 

08033 hOLMAN/ S'^'EVEN P 350 STATION A hadDONFIELD Nj 

CS049 SHEPIDAN/ MICHAEL A 511 jDHnSOn Pl MAGNOlIA NJ 

05055 LANtEl"Ej BRUCE EDWARD 90 CjTC^OGUE TRAlL MEDFORD LAKES NJ 

05075 30WKER/ TIMOTHY PATRICK 42 NOTRE DAME DR DElRAN NJ 

08534 MA^KS/ CANDaCE lEIGh 2i TIMBERLANE DR PENNINGTON NJ 

085*0 BROwN> ELIZABETH BOONE 191 HARTLEY AVE PRINCETON NJ 

0S540 CLANCY/ KEVIN C 6 NEWLIN RD PRINCETON NJ 

08540 LEWIS/ STEPHEN FRASER 5 EAS*^ SHORE DP PRINCETON NJ 

0854C lYLE/ CUENTIn E III 87 AUDUBON LN PRINCETON NJ 

05540 maDden/ JOHN Dale 155 BERTRAND DR PRInCETON NJ 

08540 MORRIS/ PATRICIA A 417 HERRONTOWN PRINCETON NJ 

C85»C MURPHY/ ANDREA ROSEMARv 12 MaDISON St PRINCETON NJ 

0555C STIeFEl./ frank III 44 waSSaU PL PRINCETON JCT NJ 

08721 SIShOP/ ROBERT W 35 LAWRENCE AVE BAYVIlLE NJ 

05807 REICH/ RICHARD BLAiR 585 COUNTRY CLUB RD BRIDQEWATER NJ 

0S822 CHAPPLE/ RONALD jAMES RD 5 BOX 102 FlEMINGTON NJ 

06857 DENE-^Y/ thaD RICHARD 25 TULIP DRIVE OLD BRIDGE NJ 

08865 KAUlIUS/ JAMES a 408 FIRth ST FHIllIPSBURG NJ 

09032 CURTIS/ SUSAN ELAINE HQ USAFE/SOX 7751 APO NEW YORK NY 

09164 COOk/ STEPHANIE LEA CSOESEA DIRECTORA"^E APC NEW YORK NY 

7514 EGGENSTEIN 

09633 STICKNEY/ DOJGuAS H BOX 6567 aPQ NEW YORK NY 

10C24 ANSPACt-/ PAUL DAVID 118 WEST 79TH ST NEw YORK NY 

10523 DOmeRTYj KEVIN J 22 N PERKINS AVE ELmSFQRD NY 

10583 CUNNINGHAM/ JOHN BE 2 OBRY DRIVE SCaPSDALE NY 

1C594 LAPplE/ ROBERT C 88 ROLLING HILLS RD THORNWCOD 



10708 GOODELL/ Tlh-.OTHV S 12 ElM ROCK RD BRCNXVILLE 



NY 
NY 



146 1C70E SAChTJEN/ BARRY W 1 THE HIGH ROAD BRQNXVlLLE NY 



1C708 wIERy GJ^EGORY WiLLlAM 110 TANiQLEWYLDE AVE BRCNXVILLE NY 

10801 CAP0«?AlE> SALVATORE III 3i2 MAYFLOWER AVE NEW ROCHELLE NY 

10803 KASON/ EriLY HARVEY kscO BOSTON POST RD PElHAM MANOR NY 

1C965 DURHAh, PETER L 72 VETERANS PARKWAY PEaRU RIVER NY 

il£Cl =^aRk/ ROBERTSON T 115 WILLOW ST BROOKLYN NY 

11£16 h'ICkMaNj FRANKtlN 132 HANCOCK ST BROOKLYN NY 

11530 KNOwLESi GEORGE M 32m ELLINGTON AVE GARDEN CITY NY 

MITCHELL FIELD 

11530 KL'StER^ JAMES RICHARD 5 KENSINGTON ROAD GARDEN CITY NY 

11570 MILaNO^ BETH ANN 140 HARVARD AVE ROCKVILLE CTR NY 

11733 CAMpbELLj STUART BROWN CO\'SCIEnCE BAY RD SETAUKET NY 

Il7f6 DEHCNEY^ SUSAN h PRaIRIE ROAD HJNTINQTON STA NY 

i:7%6 MENCHEL/ HARC 132 RYDER AVENUE Dix HILLS NY 

11787 OEHLERi DEBORAH JEAN 13 DOGWOOD DRIVE SMITHTOWN NY 

11901 RaInEY, DAVID C 523 WASHINGTON AVE RIvERHEAD NY 

11S52 OGlLVIE^ KEVIN AHNFELDT FOX HOLLOW ROAD MATTITUCK NY 

1202C NORWOOD/ KENNETH w JR RD 2 DEvIlS LANE BALLSTON SPA NY 

12136 0*EnS/ RODERICK EDWARD RD 1 PETERSBURG NY 

12211 eC^DURANT/ STuART P 11 SCHUYLER HILLS RD LOUDONVIllE NY 

12*55 SLUITEF/ PETER JOHN HILLTOP ROAD MARGARET VlLLE NY 

12603 SILVER/ HAYDEN J III S BRENTwOOD DR POuGHKEEPSIE NV 

12972 JONES/ CATHERINE SJSANnE RPD 1 PARTRIDGE HiLL PERU NY 

13326 HERMAN/ MARGARET C 22 HILL ST COOPERSTOWN NY 

13301 wIlFLEY/ mark K 681 CHENANGO ST BInGHaMTON NY 

13903 WEBER/ FREDERICK H 317 MANCHESTER RD BINGHAMTON NY 

14223 LAMORTE/ ANDREA l7l wODDCREST BLVD KENMDRE NY 

1*617 KLInG; ROBERT WILlIaM 189 SAGAMORE DR ROCHESTER NY 

1*617 ST0L2E/ TED * 3UAY DR ROCHESTER NY 

1*622 LANIC/ MICHAEL THOMAS 235 SENECA ROAD ROCHESTER NY 

1*625 LENNOX/ DAVID GIlBERT 26 DENONVILLE RIDGE ROCHESTER NY 

l'.76C BR'JCE/ KENNET hiLLlAM 529 pROsPECT AVENUE CLEAN NY 

1*8S2 THOMPSON/ f.ARK ALuAN 792 RIDGE ROAD LANSING NY 

15C1C GOLMCNT/ JOEL MICHAEL 910 ROCK AVE BEaVER FALLS PA 

1513S HOFFMANN/ DAVID MARTIN 391 WASHINGTON AVE OAKMONT PA 

15135 MAK'GELSDORF/ CHRISTOPHER 835 SEVENTH STREET CAKMOnT PA 

15228 WADDELL/ MARSHALL ARTnjR 66 LDNGUE VUE DR MT LEBANON PA 

15235 BODE/ thOMAS C 35 HOLLAND RD PITTSBURGH PA 

15241 RIECK/ .KIMBERLE^ DURHAM 187 BOXFIELD RD PITTSBURGH Pi 

152*3 SHERtvOCD/ wILLlAM DALE 63 MOFFeTT ST PITTSBURGH PA 

15*C1 BEARD/ ROBERT G 19 BELMEADE TR UNIONTOWN PA 

15825 MCKIN1.EY, WILLIAM Z *20 MAIN STREET BROOKVlLLE PA 

16115 CRErS/ laRRY LYNN ROUTE 2 DARLINGTON PA 

16801 HESS/ MARK EDwaROS 620 N HOLMES ST STATE COLLEGE PA 

17057 ClOuSER/ HILARY ANNE 101 W MaIN ST MIODLETOWN PA 

18015 KENNEDY/ MICHAEL DAVID ROUTE 7 BETHLEHEM PA 

18018 SChlEIFER/ PAUL C 1021 BLAKE GT BETHLEHEM PA 

18301 CASTE..LI/ JEFFREY W BOX 8* ESSC E STROUDSBURG PA 

18901 FABliN/ STEPHEN B CENTjRY HOUSE ARTS DOyLESTOWN PA 

APT 228 WEST 

19018 SHElL^/ KEVIN C 80* HAWTHORNE AVE PRIMOS PA 

19C63 ROS9INS/ KEVIN RICHARD 2 DEvON LANE MEDIA PA 

1906* REED/ ANN ELIZABETH 32 ThORnRIDGE RD SPRINGFIELD PA 

19067 PaTtCS/ DAVID STERLING 2008 MAkEFIELD RD YARDLEY PA 

19075 JACOBS/ BRIAN F *1 RED OAK RD ORELAND PA 

19087 SMiTK, DAVID Claude i fenimore lane st davids pa 

19067 hlL^lAHS/ KIRKlEY R JR 309 EDGEHIi_L RD WAYNE PA 

19118 meBanE/ wiLLlAM N IV 609 E GRAVERS LN PHILADELPHIA PA 

19129 ERDkAN/ MARY BELlE 3S03 THE OAK ROAD PmILADELPHIA PA 

19135 MCCARTHY/ ROBERT RICHARD 6369 DITMAN ST PHILADELPHIA PA 

19301 THOMSON/ S GRAEME OXBOW/ BOX 167 PAOLI PA 

19312 TuRf.gjpKTE/ JOHN HUTSON 265 KELlER RD BERWYN PA 

IStOl URBanC/ AUDREY MARIE 1935 JUNlATA RD NORRISTOWN PA 

19*6C MCAvOY/ SUSAN MCAVOY LANE PHOENIXVILLE PA 

19i.6C MACotDE/ WiLLlAM H 111 niCDADE RD RD 1 PHOENIXVILLE PA 

19<.6t VfSTER/ SAMUEL RUSSELL 869 BROOKSIDE RD POTTSTOWN PA 

19605 PESicOSKY/ MICHAEL A 1201 ELIZABETH AVE lAURElOAlE PA , . -, 



STUDENT BODY 

19elC COOPER, BRIAN SCCTT 1723 CLEVELAND AVE wYOIlSSING 

19707 RAWLlNGS/ DaVID JEFFREY RT 2 EDx 376 HCCKESSIN 

19720 KULLi ROBERT WARREN 207 MENOELL PLACE NEn CASTLE 

19803 FftOEHLICH/ HERVEY ^ JR 123 MONTCHAN DR WILMINGTON 

1SS03 PA"!t0N/ JAMES LEELAND 10^ DEXTER RD WILMINGTON 

ISSO* haYmaN, ROBERT L ^519 ROSuYN DP WILMINGTON 

19507 CAMERONy MARY KIRK 106 KIPk ROAD GREENVILLE 

19807 JOHNSON/ THOMAS A B 8 BARLEY MILL DR wiLMINGTON 

19808 LOoANi JOSEPH P 2622 PECKSNIFF RD WILMINGTON 
i993t COfTS, GWENDOLYN E 211 WEEKS DRIVE CAMDEN 
20008 FICkLEN, ANNE 35l3 3»TH ST., NW WASHINGTON 
20C15 UMH/^u, JOHN C 8805 CONN AVE CHEVY CKaSE 
20015 UMi-iAU> »-ILLlAf FLEET 8805 CONN AVE CHEVY CHASE 
2003*. CALHCUNy LAURA : 6003 BEECH AVE BETHESDA 
20752 CARTER/ ROBERT D JR BOX 312 FORT MEADE 
2076C JEFprIEs, JAMES WATT JR 10208 KINDLY CT GAITHERSBURG 
20760 SAHlROCTj JON TODD 16624 S wESTLAND DR GaITHERSBURG 
20852 GRICE/ LYNN ClaIBORNE 7121 PLANTATION LN ROCKVILLE 
20B5'» BENEDICT/ VICTORIA N lOS-tO SpRINGKNOLL DR POTOMAC 
2085'* DAUM/ CATHERINE ANNE 9^36 TOBIN CIR POTOMAC 
2085^* r.CHuGH/ NOELLE SUZANNE 12012 GlEN MIlL RD POTOMAC 
20854 SChuESSLER/ DOUGLAS PAUL 9 ORCHARD WAY SOUTH ROCKVILLE 
2090'* KELlEY/ ROBERT W 13616 FaIRRIDGE OR SILVER SPRING 
2090** RICE/ CHARLES F III 1321 CHJLTON DR SILVER SPRING 
20906 MCCONNELL/ KEVIN R 12806 EPPING TERR WHEATCN 
21111 HULL/ STEVEN GEORGE 1912 CDRBETT RD MONKTON 
2114'6 FETCHO/ JOHN JAHES 483 f"AlR OAKS DR SEVERNA PARK 
21157 DULanY/ THOMAS P-TRICk 11670lD TAN'E>'T0wN RD WESTMINSTER 
21204 BENMNGHOFF/ BRIAN S 1804 A CIRCLE RD RUXTON 

21204 hORINE/ CATHERINE M 1414 LOCUST AVE RUXTON 

21204 NOEL/ HARK WESTBROOK 1521 DOxBURY RD TOwSON 

21207 LEGlER/ peter ThOMAS 7131 FAIRBROOK RD BALTIMORE 

21208 ANDERSON/ EDWARD PAUL .727 Ci-IFFEDGE RD BALTIMORE 
21210 BREnT/ MARGARET G 110 EDGEVAlE RD BALTIMORE 
21210 HOCntETT, STACY H III 6 LAKE MANOR CT BALTIMORE 
21228 KING/ DavID i. 16 S BEECHWOOD AVE BALTIMORE 
21228 MARSHALL/ PEYTON J III 402 OAK FOREST AVE CATONSVlLLE 
218C1 PARKER/ ALAN ROBERT ROJTE 4 BOX 61 SALISBURY 
21801 WhItE/ ThOMAS F RT 1 BOX 55 SALISBURY 
21873 AUGUSTINE/ DUNCAN C JR LOCUST lANE WHITEHAVEN 
22003 hARtSOE/ JOSEPH R 4700 MONTEREY DR ANNANDaLE 
22003 PANtglER/ MICHAEL A 8130 BRIAR CREEK DR ANNANDALE 
22003 PaRkS/ COLLEEN A 71C2 CInDY LANE ANNANDALE 
22024 hIlsON/ KATHLEEN SUE 6414 ChaPELVIEw RD CLIFTON 
2203C AnShELFS/ CaThy LEE 9119 GLENBROOK RD FAIRFAX 
22042 HCRN/ THOMAS DAG 64fcl EPPARD ST FALLS CHURCH 
22C91 MCGraTH, DCRN C III 11809TRIPLE CROWN RD RESTON 
22101 CHRISCO/ JUlIA WINTER 2000 VA AVENUE MClEAN 
22101 GRIFFITH/ mARRv a III 8227 RIDING RIDGE PL MCLEAN 
22101 MARtIN/ ROBERT RUSSELL 77l2 FAlSTAFF RD MClEAN 
22101 TRADER/ DAVID A 6441 W LANGLEY LN MCLEAN 
22117 GALLAGHER/ MARGARET W HALFwAY FARM MiDDLEBURG 
221S0 EKTwISTlE/ JAMES F 2il ROSS DR SW VIENNA 

22301 WILLIS/ MARY BURTON 104 COMMONWEALTH AVE ALEXANDRIA 

22302 BURkE/ ANN WYATT 823 CRESCENT DR ALEXANDRIA 
22302 MACCONOMY/ SCOTT DOUGLAS 507 WOODLAND TERR ALEXANDRIA 
22306 BOSwELL/ STEwaRT M lb20 COuRTLAND RD ALEXANDRIA 
22306 haRbCT^lE/ SCOTT ALLAN 1900 COURTlAND RD ALEXANDRIA 
2230S PINckNEY/ THOMAS C III 86C1 BUCKBOARD DR ALEXANDRIA 
22308 PIPER/ David SCCTT 2609 STIRRUP LN ALEXANDRIA 

22308 PIPER/ STEPHEN MICHAEL 2609 STjRRUP LanE ALEXANDRIA 

22309 SCAnDi-ING/ MARK W 3015 BATTERSEA LANE ALEXANDRIA 
22314 MACgILL/ MARTHA NELL 607 CAMERON ST ALEXANDRIA 
22401 KELLY/ DAVID LOUIS 719 FREEMAN ST FREDERICKSBURG 
22485 BRABAN'T/ DARLENE ANN P D BOX 46 KING GEORGE 

14g 22520 CH^ISTENSEN/ JAMES ERIC MOnTRCSS 



! STUDENT BODY 

^22578 ALSTON/ CHARLES WYATT 

2260: METZEL/ jETFREy CONE 366 KERN STREET 

:22712 YOWELL/ JOHN PHILIP RT 1 BOX 209 

227*0 STOKES^ WiLLlAI ALLEN P BOX 3000 

22801 ALLEN/ MARGARET ANN 210 DIXIE AVENUE 

22801 MORTON/ LAWRENCE R 485 ANDERGREN DR 

22901 DECK/ SARAh KQOTTEN 2502 HiLLwOCD PL 

22901 ERNj CAROL JEAN 1618 KING MTN ROAD 

22901 HARBERT/ GUY MORLEY III 1923 GREENBRIER DR 

22903 HORN/ RALPH DOUGLASS 700 HIGHLAND AVE 

22903 HUNTLEY/ HOWARD L JR mS-ARLINQTON CT APTS 

23005 eOLDRIDGE/ DAVID W RT 1 BOX 73 

2315C WILSON/ IRVINE TATE RT 1 BOX 262 

23225 JOHNSON/ STEPHEN HALL 2720 KENMORE ROAD 

23225 LIVELY/ MARVIN E 3061 MIDLOTHIAN pIkE 

23225 ROBERTSON/ MARJORIE W 2956 HATHAWAY RD 

APT 1206 

23225 WILLIAMS/ JOHN TAYLOR L 7*'*1 HIlL DRIVE 

23226 GILCHRIST/ HENRY V 207 VIRGINIA AVE 
23226 GILCHRIST/ MARY GRAY 207 VIRGINIA AVE 
23226 JONES/ ANNE BEVERLEY 103 N WILTON RD 
23226 NEAL/ WiLLlAM H III 326 GREENWAY LANE 

23226 THOMPSON/ THOMAS P 6903 EDMONSTONE AVE 

23227 BROWN/ RUTH C 3908 SEMINARY AVE 
23227 GOODPASTURE/ KATHERINE E 3501 BROOK ROAD 

23227 WILLIAMSON/ RUTH 3t06 GLOUCESTER RD 
23226 30YCE/ RICHARD N 7802 TOPAZ RD 

23228 MILES/ MARGARET CAROLYN 2215 WEDGEWOOD AVE 

23229 BROwN/ JEFFREY A 2110 HAVlLAND DR 
2322S CONNETTE/ ALBERT STONE 77l6 DARTMOOR RD 
23229 GOErTZ/ STEVEN RICHARD 4 N MOORELAND RD 
23229 JENNINGS/ C FOSTER jR 501 RIDGE TOP ROAD 
2322S jONeS/ EDWARD LEE III 1011 BORDEN RD 
23229 KEMP/ BRUCE FORBES JR 8909 TRESCO RD 
23229 PATE/ EMILY ELIZABETH 731* NORMANDY DR 
23229 THOMAS/ ELIZABETH C 708 W DRIVE CIR 
23235 GOODMAN/ ROBERT C III 3f01 ELLSWORTH RD 
23235 LONDREY/ GREGG LESLIE 4173 TRaYLOR DR 
23235 WhiTNEY/ KATHERINE M 4128 BEECHMONT RD 
23261 REVnOLDS/ RICHARD S IV P BOX 26544 
23455 OLIVER/ HILTON 4856 HAyQOOD RD 
23508 BOYD/ WIlLIAM E JR 901 HANOVER AVE 
23508 HOSaY/ CHARLES ANDREW 615 VIRGINIA AVE 
23606 CAlNE/ ThOMAS PHILIP III 116 STONEWALL PL 
23661 HQRnE/ MATTHEW B 3737 CHESAPEAKE AVE 
23669 KAYTON/ GILBERT S^UaRT 120 HORSESHOE lDG 
23669 ROWr, GARY L 820 LITTLE BACK 

RIVER ROAD 

23669 WILSON/ FRANCES SALE 28 IVY HOME ROAD 

23824 INGE/ JUDITH ANN 803 LUNENBURG AVE 

2»t012 OVEPSTREET/ GARY C 133 OAKlAWN AVE 

24014 DaRBY/ MARGARET W 2934 aVeNHAM AVE 

S W 

24014 MURRAY/ ALEXANDER VANCE 4825 BUCKHORN RD SW 

2tOl4 mjRra^/ ROBERT CRAlQE «»S25 BUCKHORN RD 

24014 NICHOLSON/ EDWARD H JR 3920 THREE CHOP LN 

2406C SHOULDERS/ ROBER" ED«ARD 509 MONTE VISTA DR 

24153 HARvEY/ ANN GRAY 227 TAYlDR AVENUE 

24153 robertson/ virginia l 631 dogwood dr 

24201 paRkS/ Elizabeth 435 Arlington ave 

24201 PaR<S/ GEORGE KING 435 ARLINGTON AVE 

24301 KELLY/ RICHARD SIGMON RT 1 BOX 367 

24327 STEVENSON/ LAURA ELLEN P DRAWER S 

24401 HAMricK/ JOHN HINER 215 FILLI^ORE ST 

24401 SPRUNT/ RUTH hOBSON 111 ROSE HILL CIR 

24426 CRAWFORD/ GREGORY ALAN 515 E FOCH STREET COVINGTON VA 149 



WHITESTONE 


VA 


WINCHESTER 


VA 


bealeton 


VA 


SPERRYVILLE 


VA 


HARRISONBURG 


VA 


HARRISONBURG 


VA 


CHARLOTTESVILLE 


VA 


CHARLOTTESVILLE 


VA 


CHARLOTTESVILLE 


VA 


CHARLOTTESVILLE 


VA 


CHARLOTTESVILLE 


VA 


ASHLAND 


VA 


SAnDSTON 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


RICHMOND 


VA 


VIRGINIA BEACH 


VA 


NORFOLK 


VA 


NORFOLK 


VA 


NEWPORT NEWS 


VA 


HAMPTON 


VA 


HAMPTON 


VA 


HAMPTON 


VA 


HAMPTON 


VA 


BLACKSTONE 


VA 


ROANOKE 


VA 


ROANOKE 


VA 


ROANOKE 


VA 


ROANOKE 


VA 


ROANOKE 


VA 


BLACKSBURG 


VA 


SAlEM 


VA 


SALEM 


VA 


BRISTOL 


VA 


BRISTOL 


VA 


PULASKI 


VA 


EMORY 


VA 


STAUNTON 


VA 


STAUNTON 


VA 


COVINGTON 


VA 



STUDENT BODY 

c»i»5C HA^RISCNj NiTMANAEL R 6 wHUE STREET 

2^502 pEPkEY/ RIC-IARD CORvDOn 413 DAWnRIDGE DR 

Z^boS GISeR'j ja.IEE MC II: 225 NORcOlk AVE 

?''503 WA'kINS^ CAROL ELI2aBE*^h 1551 lExInGTON DR 

2*523 BC3GESS.. JO^N HOBaCK F C BOX m9u 

2'»523 ENGlISi-/ ELIZABET- D 93C aSHlANO AVE 

S^C^i HALl^ LARRY 177 DALTQN STREET 

c'.S^l r^C^i.ZOi.r, BRUCE ROBER' 316 ROBE='"'SON AVE 

2*»541 KEFc»-iARj JAriES K 30* lINDEn DR 

2*541 -.URRAY, ROBERT R III 33l VIRGINIA AVE 

2*541 STOnEBuRNER/ SARA ELLEN 451 SOU'l'Hi.AND DR 

24541 STRANGEy CHARLTON B III 315 w "IaIN STREET 

24541 «hlTE> KAREN VICTORIA :94 FAIRMONT CIR 

24558 ED"'UNDSy AMY LORRAINE RT 1 BOX 705-A 

24622 HiN<lNSy STEPHEN G S*AR ROU'l'E BOX 189 

247*0 ANDERS/ GREGG "^ P 2 BOX 693 

24740 GOHCi CUR'IS D JR 432 3UAI,. VAllEY 

2474C MORRISON/ CIND^ LOL 1028 MEaDOR ST 

247*0 SMiTHj STEPHEN JEROME FT 1 BOX 217-F 

24901 PA'TEFSON, C"ARlES m P D BOX 126 

25311 BRDaDHEaD/ WALTER E i502 k«lNDSOR PLACE 

25314 OBLINGERj PriluLIF F 1799 H'JSER RCaD 

25443 SCYlE/ BRENDa MARIE BOX 119 A RT 1 

258C1 SIGf-UND/ wlLLIAM RAY n <»0C NDRTHt.JESTERN AVE BECKLEY 

25SC1 2AMB0S/ JOHN MITCHELL 102 franKLIN AVE 

26105 GILMORE/ SCOTT MIODuETON 461C 4Th AVE 

26155 f-ERTZOG/ KEITh RUSSElL 5S E SEnJAmIN DR 

26426 MLLDOON/ WILLIAM ^OST JACOBS RUN 

27C12 DuRDEN/ mFRIDETh COLuIkS 5945 ARCEN DRIVE 

27012 RABILj STEPHEN MARK P BOX 293 

27012 REDDEN/ jaCCJELYN MARIE 6370 ARDEN FST CIR 

2701S SCRJGGS/ JACK GOLD JR p BOX 99 

27028 v<Ai_L/ wjA'-ES grief 4*5 CHlRC^ ST 

27030 MCCOY/ haRRELL " JR F BOX 6*5 

27055 LONG/ Gk'YNN D f c BOX 154 

27103 CHESHIRE^ RICHARD A 27*8 lJLLINGTON DR 

27103 ROBINSON/ ChaRlES R JC 2622 LUn-INGTON DR 
2710* BRDwN/ 3FJCE TANKaRD 5*00 OJaR^ERSTaFF f 

27104 CONRflD/ JOHN CHRISTIAN S35 OAKJAWN AVE 
2710* CONRAD/ _EE ANNE 738 «EST0VER AVE 
2710* CORDElu/ ALFRED R JF 3*9 ARBOR ROAD 
2710* GlLpFR"/ KAREN SJE 272 F;.t>,7ch1RE RD 
2710* GOLDEN/ JOHN M JR 313 DEERGLADE RD 
2710* MANMNGy KENNETH SCOTT ^ ; r. trIaR tuck RD 
2710* NAFpE=/ ER3N ElIZaBET- 2670 REYNOLDS DRIVE 
27104 =OLuOC</ FRANK ED>^ARD JR 2833 FORES' DRIVE 
27:04 RhYkE/ ALFRED L III 1537 FJNN'YMEOE RD 
2710* ROSENBERG/ RONALC E 511 STAFFORDSHIRE 
27106 BaRnhIl^/ GRADY M 3121 ROBInhOOD RD 
27106 CATRON/ sANC^ EuLEN 135 ROSEDa;.E CIRCLE 
27106 DOUGLAS/ JAMES EFFS 5230 ShaTTalON DR 
27106 JOYCE/ WALTER C^YDE JR 3960 CLARENDON AVE 
27106 KEElS/ pENElO^E JOAN 3861 TAnGlE LANE 
27106 mIllER/ hILlIAM M 620 NOKOMIS COURT 

27106 RCBtnSON/ MICHAEL L 2*70 THoRNFIElD RD 

27107 CUNkinG"aM/ DAR^ENE L 1621 PlEASaNT sT 
27107 ShIElDS/ RANDALL KEITi- 3721 S haIn ST 
27203 aDAmJj GREGORY BROOKS 1*2* KESTwOOD DR 
27203 CASPER/ SUSAN BARNES 1236 NEEuY DRIVE 
27203 CRO-aR'IE/ CAROwINE K 1313 NEE-^ DRIVE 
27203 DAVIS/ DEBORA" r^ 620 MAPlE AVE 
27215 CC^AN/ -IRlAM F 919 n DaVIS ST 
27215 --EwMS/ STEVEN STE^'AR' 3333 ELK DRIVE 
27215 hc^T/ Ralph Manning lii p d BOX 8i9 
27215 uCNG/ Carol KaThlEEn 2725 EDGE>^OOD AVE 

T50 27215 "^CNFF.v, CYRJS C III 1231 may COURT 



LEXINGTON 


VA 


LYNCHBURG 


VA 


LYNCHBURG 


VA 


LYNCHBURG 


VA 


BEDFORD 


VA 


BEDFORD 


VA 


DANVlLwE 


VA 


DanvIluE 


VA 


DanVIluE 


VA 


DANVILLE 


VA 


OanvIllE 


VA 


DanvIllE 


VA 


Danville 


VA 


MAI.IFAX 


VA 


JEwEll ridge 


VA 


PRINCETON 


WV 


PRINCETON 


WV 


PRINCETON 


WV 


PRINCETON 


WV 


lE^ISBURG 


WV 


ChaR^ES-^ON 


WV 


ChaRuESTOn 


WV 


ShepheRDSTOkn 


kV 


BECKLEY 


WV 


BECKLEY 


*l\- 


VIENNA 


WV 


N MARTINSVILLE 


WV 


SAlEM 


WV 


ClEMMCNS 


NC 


CuEMMONS 


NC 


ClEMMONS 


NC 


GERMANTON 


NC 


mOCKSvIlLE 


NC 


M T AIRY 


NC 


YADKlNVlLLE 


NC 


hiNSTON SALEM 


NO 


hiNSTON SAlEM 


NC 


hl.^^STON SAlEM 


NC 


^iINSTON SA;.EM 


NO 


kInSTOn SAlEM 


NC 


»^INST0N SAlEM 


NC 


WINSTON SA^E" 


NC 


kiNSTON SALEM 


NC 


WINSTON SALEM 


NC 


WINSTON SalE*^ 


NC 


ulNSTON SA,.E^' 


NC 


wInSTOn SalEm 


NC 


kINSTOn SAlEM 


NC 


nINSTON SAlEM 


NC 


WINSTON SAlEM 


NC 


»»INST0N SALEf 


NC 


hiNSTON SAlEM 


NC 


hInston SAuEm 


nC 


mINSTON SALEM 


NC 


-INSTON SAlEM 


NC 


kINSTON SAlEM 


NC 


».InSTOn Salem 


NC 


aSmEBORC 


NC 


AS^iEBORO 


NC 


ASHEBORO 


NC 


ASHEBORO 


NC 


BURlINGton 


NC 


BuRlINGTON 


NC 


BUR,.In6T0N 


NC 


BURLINGTON 


NC 


BJRlInGTON 


NC 



27215 PEELERi ALISON C 91C W DaVIS ST 

27215 SL'TTCN^ EDWAkD C JR 3021 S FAIRWAY DR 

27215 SuTTON^ ROBERT PITMAN 3021 S FAIRWAY DR 

2726C ARMSTRONG/ MARK R 1502 W LEXINGTON ■ 

2726C CRiTGi JOHN OnEAl III 51C SPRUCE STREET 



5w AKnsjKCNQ/ HAKK K 

2726C CRiTGi JOHN OnEAl 

2726C MAYES/ ANN BECKwIT 

27260 JENSEN, SCOTT MCKE 

2726C S'OuT/ CYNTHIA B 

27262 AMOS/ MARY R 

27262 BENCINI, FRANKLIN T 

-,-7^-- -ALL.i NEWTON MADISON 
CCkMANj JERR"' P II 



51C SPRUCE air^l 

1006 CREEKSIDE 
911 TRENTON ST 
1223 KENSINGTON DR 
1025 ROCKfORD 
801 COUNTRv CLUE DR 
916 FAIRWAY DR 
512 LAKE DR 



BURLINGTON 

BURLINGTON 

BURLINGTON 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

HIGH POINT 

KERNERSVILLE 

EDEN 

EDEN 

LEXINGTON 

LEXINGTON 

LEXINGTON 

LEXINGTON 

LEXINGTON 

PITTSBORO 

REIDSVILLE 

REIDSVILLE 

SANP'ORD 

SANFQRD 

SANFORD 

SAnFORD 

SANFORD 

GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 




GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 

GREENSBORO 

BUTNER 

CHAPEL HILL 

CHAPEL HILL 
CHAPEL HILL 
CHAPEL HILL 
CHAPEL HILL 
CHAPEi. HILL 
CHAPEl HILL 
CmaPEL HILL 
CLAYTON 
GOlDSBORO 
HENDERSON 
HENDERSON 
HENDERSON 

NORLINA 



NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC' 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 

NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 
NC 



STUDENT BODY 



151 



STUDENT BODY 



152 



27573 BaSs^ JAMES A HI 323 READE DRIVE 

27591 HICkS/ JCSEPH CARTER III 8 DOQWOOD TRaIl 

2760'' MARtOP"^ CHARLES A 27o5 TRaWICK ROaD 

2760* NEWMAN^ MElEN JEAN 320i BREMWOOD RD 

27606 ROBERTS; CYNThIA ANN 70? -^ERRIE RCAD 

27607 kI^lER> page ALLISON 2628 wADE AVENUE 
276C7 nIlSON/ ADRIAN NEwTON 2206 COlE^ FOREST P 
276CS EGERTONy ALICE COURTNEY 2528 YORK RD 
276C5 DCSS/ AIDA PAYAR 7li HARlOWE ROAD 
27609 GNAGEY^ HOLLY DEE 1001 TYRRELL ROaD 
27605 GCDaRj STEPHEN E 508 BLAKEWOOD DR 
27609 "ERwARTh., MICHAEL R 515 maRlOWE DR 
27609 TO^mE'?DAhL< mark ALLEN 709 MACON PLACE 
27609 TC^mERDahL/ PATRICIA 709 MACON PlACE 
27t09 YC^<, MARK W 3745 LASSITER MILL 
27612 MAYnARD/ WANDa 3AIL 6706 VALLEY LAKE DR 
27612 SUMmERElL/ BERTA ALLEN 5937 POnDEROSa RD 
27612 SUMmEREulj JOSEPH J JR 5937 POnDERCSa RD 
H7704 CRENS'^A>,y MArlON C III 55C1 ROxBORO RD 
27705 uANGCOR:., TIMOTHY Danie^ 2002 DapTmOUTm DR 
27705 MCCRACKEN^ NANCY B 3414 CORNKALLIS RD 
277C5 paRtINj E^'IL^ ALLISON 2739 SPENCER ST 
27705 STOnE> ElLEN ClAIRE 5 1 1 -^ PINE traIl DP 
27707 ELYj GECfPREY B 3546 HAmSTEAD CT 
27707 ELY, cETER lINCOLN 35*6 HAMSTEAD CT 
27707 LiNDER/ VIRGINIA CARC;.YN 301". BUCKINSha*^ RD 
27707 mIulER/ THOMAS R 392* nO^'TawAY RD 
27707 mURDAUG^, GEORGE BRYAN 3207 HOPE VALLEY RD 
27707 MijRoaUGh, SJSAN E 3207 hOpE VAllEY RD 
2782S PATTERSON^ KENNETH T DUKE DRIVE 
2762C YELVERTONi PHILLl^ W RT 1 BOX 53 
2763* TUCkER^ JOHN AlLEN RT 9 BOX 525 

27834 hhIte^ Elizabeth a 525 lCngmeadow road 

27834 hlLKERSOK/ VICTORIA k 202 DEERhOOD DR 

27S34 wILLCCX, SARAH TILTON 239 WINDSOR ROAD 

27855 CaUlKINS^ BONNIE A 500 LAKEVIEW DR 

27885 MORTON/ JAMES KEVIN 115 ^lERCE ST 

27893 AVEkTj -aRGARET ASHLEY 216 fORrS-^ HILL RD 

27893 FIELDS/ cRANKlIN OSBORnE 806 EVERGREEN DR 

27895 haBeryaN/ KARl F 12l5 pEaChTRee RD 

27893 YOUNG/ thQMaS MEaRES 1133 WOODLAND DRIVE 

27909 STOlL/ ANDREW TIMOTHY 1505 HOPKINS DR 

279H2 SHARP, S'ARKEY V p BOX 96 

27S62 FiTpAN, wiLLlAM LISTON SUAIl DRIVE 

27979 MORGAN/ MARv CHESTER P BOX 176 

279S6 JONES/ WILLIAM HUGi BOX 7 

2S0C: DYER/ ROBERT KENT JR 1503 MElCHQR RD 

28C17 MURrELLj ZACK E BOX 901 

28023 hElMS/ mark EDWARD RT 2 BOX 127 

25025 CANNON/ BARR" FRANKLIN 687 UNION ST S 

28025 ChRiS'^Y/ RALPH S jR 389 pC?LAR TEN'' RD 

25!J25 COMER/ GLENN HARCuD 761 HARRIS S "!" 

28025 JENKINS/ CARLTON AVER^ 31 GROVE AVENUE 

28025 lCVE/ DavID CALVIN RT 1 BOx 184 

28025 MILlER/ KENNETH WARD JR 11 CaBARRJS AVE w 

28025 nEEdha^-/ mark LINDSAY RT 3 BOX 56B 

28025 RANKIN, RICHARD B III P BOX 3295 

Wl^MAR STATION 

2S032 REESE/ DENNIS CDwARD GENERAL DElIvERy 

2S036 BRCwN/ CIlNE HOGG RT 1 BOX 719 

2sc36 cjrrie/ robert a jr 773 concord st 

2&c36 horowitz/ carol yeomans box 1073 

28036 "cuchei.'s/ clayton f box 2318 greenway s 

28036 kEllO/ Margaret box 262 

28036 k'IMmEL/ STEPHEN G 420 N MilN ST 

2SC36 KNiGH'/ DAVID L BOX 326 DAVIDSON NC 

28036 MANNING/ CAROLINA F BOX 2345 DAVIDSON NC 



ROxBORO 


NC 


WENDELL 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RAuEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGm 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


RAlEIGH 


NC 


RALEIGH 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM . 


N^ 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


DURHAM 


NC 


Durham 


NC 


Durham 


NC 


F ARMVILLE 


NC 


FREMONT 


NC 


GREENVILLE 


NC 


GREENVILLE 


NC 


GREENVILLE 


NC 


GREENVILLE 


NC 


MURFREEStORO 


NC 


NASHINGTON 


NC 


WILSON 


NC 


wIlSON 


NC 


kILSON 


NC 


kIlSOn 


NC 


ELIZABETH CITY 


NC 


HARRElLSVILLE 


NC 


Plymouth 


NC 


sunbury 


NC 


hiNTON 


NC 


AlBEMARLE 


NC 


boiling SPRINGS 


NC 


CHINA GROVE 


NC 


concord 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CONCORD 


NC 


CRAMERTON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


DAVIDSON 


NC 



STUDENT BODY 

26036 HORRISDN^ JOHN hOWElL 
28036 NORTHCCTT; NANCY C 
£8036 DECK/ LAURA KEEVER 
28036 POLlEY/ VANCE ERNEST 
28C36 RATLl^Fy JOHN CHARlES 
28036 Sf'.lTH/ GRAHAM F 
28036 STRoUD/ JONATHAN HC 
28036 THOMPSONi TINA ZOE 
23C36 wHlTE/ LOCKE 
28036 KOLT/. KATHERlNE FlINN 
28036 wRUcK> ERIC GORDON 

28036 WRUCK> ESTHER E 

28037 GRayBEalj MARy J 
2804? BRIi<:hANIS> JOHN A 
28052 BRCnG* DOROTHY CAROL 
HS052 uAViSy JOSEPH BLAIR JR 
28052 HOWELL/ ROGERS GLENN H 
28052 HULL/ JOANNE RUTH 
28052 LEWIS/ JAMES FjRMAN III 
28052 PEARSON/ CHARLES w JR 
2S052 RAN<IN/ LAURA 
28C76 CANNON/ RONALD EUGENE 
28078 BCYD/ STEVEN B 
28078 HUNT/ MARTHA JO 
28078 MCCORD/ KATHY 
28081 MARtIN/ ANTHONY RAY 
28086 NElSLER/ CATHERINE E 
28086 NEISLER/ HENRY PARKS JR 
28092 PAYSEUR/ CYNThIA GAIL 
28092 RHYNE/ JOHNATHAN L jR 
28105 KUNklEMaN/ GREGORY L 
28110 BENTON, JOHN 
28110 FIElDEN/ BRUCE EDWiN 
28115 HOKE/ DAvID FRED 
28115 LYOn/ franklin SCOTT 
28115 MCRROr-/ JEFFREY WILLIAM 
28115 RHYE/ TERREL M 
2S115 hICKER/ ELIZABETH ANN 
2813** PRICE/ ROBERT D 
28139 wILKlNS/ TIMOTHY S 
28139 ^IN<ER/ GUYTON JOEL 
2Sl*t BILLING^/ WILLIAM E 
2Slt«t GaScOIGNE/ LILLIAN H 

281't't loerlein/ Christopher t 
281'*'* swAiM/ David wilborn 

28150 FARrIOR/ LILIAN HOPE 
28150 JONES/ LINDA L 
26150 MCMuRRv^ HARRIS LIGON 
26150 NClaN; EDkARD BEAM JR 
2?150 STAr^EYi MICHAEL CARROLL 
28150 YOUNG/ STEPHEN LEWIS 
28160 HUGGINS/ MICHAEL B 
28166 ELLIOTT/ SAMUEL C III 
28166 WhItENER/ TIMOTHY LYNN 
28170 HILDRETH/ JAMES H JR 
£8170 TARlTON/ sandy SREWER 
28173 MORtCN/ kaTHERINE R 
25205 BRIDGES/ CHARLES PAVNE 
28205 CAThEY/ ROBER* A 
28205 ESTeS/ CEBRA GAIL 
2S205 hORnE/ FAUl ADAMS JR 
28205 MAAG/ CYNTHIA LEE 

28205 NEWELL/ VIRGINIA £ 

28206 BUHgaRNER/ LAURIE S 

28207 GOCdE/ ELIZABETH ROSS 

1S207 GRIER/ RO^Y S .. .. ._ 

2S207 KREcHCN/ "ARTIN JOHN JP 260 CHEROKEE ROAD CHARLOTTE NC 153 



RT 1 BOX 141C 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


P BOX 1*6 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


P BOX 1155 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


BOX 452 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


301 PINECREST 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


102 COLLEGE DR 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


PINE ROAD 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


RT 1 BOX 586 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


P BOX 2435 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


229 PINE ROAD 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


PINE ROaD 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


FINE ROAD 


DAVIDSON 


NC 


ROUTE 2 


DENVER 


NC 


123 WEATHERSTONE DR 


FOREST CITv 


NC 


225 SHAW AVE 


GASTONI A 


NC 


412 JENNY STREET 


GASTONIA 


NC 


1267 CAMBRIDGE DR 


GASTONIA 


NC 


3120 IMPERIAL DR 


GASTONIA 


NC 


1112 aUEENSGATE 


GASTONIA 


NC 


I3i6 PARK LN 


GASTOMA 


NC 


518 S VQRK ST 


GASTONIA 


NC 


P BOX 458 


HENRIETTA 


NC 


RT 2 BOX 289-E 


HUNTERSVILLE 


NC 


ALEXANDER LANE 


HUnTERSVILLE 


NC 


^ BOX 367 


HUNTERSVILLE 


NC 


301 SUBURBAN AVE 


KANNAPOLIS 


NC 


110 N GASTON STREET 


KINGS MOUNTAIN 


NC 


403 NEISLER DRIVE 


KINGS MOUNTAIN 


NC 


RT 2 BOX 112 


LINCOLNTON 


NC 


RT 6 BOX 75 


LINCOLNTON 


NC 


4001 MCKEE RD 


MATTHEWS 


NC 


120 FOREST HILLS DR 


MONROE 


NC 


RT 7 BOX 980 


MONROE 


NC 


422 fiELDSTONE RD 


MOORESVILLE 


NC 


338 FIElDSTONE kD 


MOORESVILLE 


NC 


981 HAMPTON PL 


MOORESVILLE 


NC 


604 S MAGNOLIA ST 


MOORESVILLE 


NC 


RT 2 BOX 599 


MOORESVILLE 


NC 


RT 1 JOHN PRICE RD 


PINEVILLE 


NC 


UNION ROAD 


rutherfordton 


NC 


314 PINE ST 


RUTHERFORDTON 


NC 


1123 ARDEN DRIVE 


SALISBURY 


NC 


14 NORTH ROAD 


SALISBURY 


NC 


1106 ROUNDKNOB AVE 


SALISBURY 


NC 


351 RICHMOND RD 


SALISBURY 


NC 


whiSnant STREET 


SHELBY 


NC 


105 HILLSIDE DRIVE 


SHEuBY 


NC 


820 EAST GRAHAM 


SHELBY 


NC 


900 SPRING GARDEN DR 


SHELBY 


NC 


BOX 17 DD RT 2 


SHELBY 


NC 


922 WEST SUMTER 


SHELBY 


NC 


BOX 354 


SPINDAlE 


NC 


P BOX 175 


TROUTMAN 


NC 


? BOX 487 


TR9UTMAN 


NC 


108 ROSE TERRACE 


WAOESBORO 


NC 


416 WHITE STORE RD 


WADESBORO 


NC 


B0>; 39 


W A X H A W 


NC 


3612 WOODLEAF ROAD 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


5308 CARRIAGE DR 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


4111 WOODLEAF RD 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


715 EAST 36TH ST 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


102S WKSHIRE PL 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


3209 COUNTRY CLUB DR 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


3610-H FREW RD 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


1321 BILTMORE DR 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


1869 QUEENS RD w 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


260 CHEROKEE ROAD 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 



STUDENT BODY 

26207 KC'MilL.- CARL LEE 1635 HERTFORD RD 

2S207 l-JLLERi lESuIE EDDY 825 aRDSLEY RD 

28207 TAYlDR^ K&PY VIRGINIA 121 HERMITAGE RD 

28207 MADE, JUlIUS J III 2026 WELLESLEY AVE 
25207 WlLKlt^S^ EDkIn 6 £758 HAMPTON AVE 
2S20O BR0WN> AMY lUCInDA RT * BOX ^70 

28208 DAVIS* ERIC F 715 WOODRUFF PL 
2S20S WILSON* RACHEL JANE RT * BOX *78 
2820S COCfER/ THOMAS E 1351 E WOODLAWN 

APT 227 

2S209 DUNLAP, EMILY RUTH 3023 SOMERSET DR 

28209 FCUSHEE/ ROBERT HOLT 1225 TOWNES RD 
2820S MORRIS* MARGUERITE C 550 MANNING DR 

25209 MORRIS/ kILLlAM MICHAEL ^712 MURRAYHILL RD 

28210 BAYmaRD, SUSAN WAL<ER S^HO EASTBURN RD 
2321C LINDNER/ WILLIAM l JR 5510 CHEDWORTH DR 
2S21C LITaKER/ DAVID GLENN RT 2 BOX M-1139 
28210 LCIaX/ henry C JR 1242-A KNOBOAK LN 
28210 FARkER* PAUL M 6522 HlQHWOOD PL 
28210 PAYnE/ BARBARA LYNN 3317 LAnDERWOOD DR 
28210 SELLERS* STEPHEN EDWARD 1819 TYVOLA RD 

25210 SELLERS* TIMOTHY G 1819 TYVOLA RD 
2821C TANNER* ELIZABETH ANN RT 3 BOX 361-B 

25210 TAYLOR* KATHERINE K 201 HERMITAGE RD 

28210 WILLIAMS* LOUIS KICHEL I't'tO EDGEWATER DR 

28211 BARRY* ERNEST H JR 3922 BERESFORD ROAD 

25211 BARtELT, PERRY LESTER 2221 THORNRIDGE RD 
28211 BINQAMAN/ LAURIE E 6600 KNIQHTSwOOD DR 
28211 BOYD* CORINNE HUNTER 2002 PINEWOOD CR 
28211 COVINGTON* PATRICK C *419 WOODLARK LANE 
28211 CROSS* WAYNE M 6743 BURLWQOD RD 
28211 DICEN2C* GUY PAUL 5650-C VIA ROMANO 
28211 GOLDING* KATHLEEN W 3313 BERESFORD 
28211 HAMILTON* FRANK H III 1350 RUTLEDQE AVE 
28211 HEINIG* MICHAEL FORREST 3521 JOHNNYCAKE LN 
28211 HiNsCN, REID Q 3400 SHARON RO 
28211 KIRkENDOL* ROBERT WARD 1210 ANDOVER RQAD 
28211 MCEwEN* ROBERT J IV 3411 PROVIDENCE RD 
28211 NEILL* ASHLEY SABRINA 2238 PiNEWOCD CIR 
28211 PETrOWSKI* nancy LEE 7009 KNiQHTSwOOD DR 
28211 PHAPR/ ROBERT BAXTER JR 432 GLEN OAKS RD 
28211 POLhILL* mark EDWaRO 4101 KInGSWOOD RD 
2S211 PRATT* JOHN RICHARD 4911SENTINEL POST RD 
26211 ROCkETT/ ALAK E 4913 CHaRMAPEG AVE 
25211 SIMMONS* CANOa jo 6814 ABBOTSWOOC DR 
2S211 TUCkER* JOHN BAREOUP 53'.0 LANSING DR 
28211 TUCkER* wILlIaM 5340 LANSING DR 
28211 WADE* HAMLIN L JH 33l3 FOxCROFT RD 
28211 wElR* KAREN RAE 3438 CARMEL FOREST 
28211 WEiR* SAMUEL GAMBLE III 34j8CARmEl FOREST OR 

28211 wOOd* JAMES FREDRICK III 3743 ABINGDON RD 

28212 fAlRES* SAdRA j 682^ MARLBROOK DR 

28212 KERR* RUSSELL MARTIN JR 7011 OLD OAK LANE 
26213 BESsELLlEU* THOMAS ;.EE RT 7 BOX 6S9-F 

28213 HARt* EDhIN Dale 1100 LOG CABIN ROAD 
£8213 MCwRV/ WILLIAM LITTLE 9203 MALLARD CRK RD 

28214 BRADLEY/ PAUL BOYD 4200 SO INTER 85 
25214 CHIlDRESS* KRISTaV M lt5 SHADOW LANE 

28215 ALBERT* HARRY L JR 2705 DORA DR 
28215 LOWOER* ANN LOUISE 2915 SEBRING CIRCLE 
28301 LING* HOWARD GEORGE III 45° ALBEMARLE DR 
28303 CONNOR* CAROLANN 410 DwlREWCOD DR 
28303 CONNOR* kENNEth FORREST 410 DWIREWOOD DR 
28303 HENSCHEN/ BRUCE L 2515 MORGANTON RD 
28303 HENSCHEN* PAUL DENMAN 2515 MORGANTON ROAD 
28303 PaRhaM/ JOHN S W jR 1506 WOODlEAF LN 

'54 28303 SAPPENFIELD* DAVID L £720 BENNINGTON RD 



CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTT-E 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE'' 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


Charlotte 


NC 


CHARLOTTE 


NC 


charlotte 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVlLLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 



2830^ HA2lE"^T/ GARY ALLAN 725 GALLOWAY DR 

2830t LEHenBAUER/ WERNER 733 NEWPORT ROAD 

28305 HUSkE* HARY STARR 130 DOBBIN AVE 

28305 JORDAN^ STUART H 1" LILLY DRIVE 

28305 JORDAN, WELDGN H JR 1 LILLY DRIVE 

28305 KELLY, WILLIAM HUSKE 127 DOBBIN AVE 

23307 CUNMNGwaM, YVQNNE-DA S 163 SHARP DRIVE 

23328 CARLTON/ ROBERT WINFIELO 902 RALEIGH RD 

28328 CARR, tvILLlAM C 507 COHaRIE DR 

28334 JOHNSON, ELIZABETH BELO 907 W PEARSALL ST 

28337 HESTER, HENRY CLIFTON P BOX 127 

28340 GREyARD, HARRY ROBINSON RT 3 BOX 633 

28341 CATeSi LAURA LYNN FREMONT STREET 
28345 LONG, NANCY ERWiN 402 JUANITA AVE 
28345 LCNQ, WIlLIAM FIFE jR 402 JUANITA AVE 
28345 SHELLEY, MARK ELDRIDSE 309 MCLEAN 
28352 CRCSSLEY, CHRISTA LYNN COLLEGE PARK 
28352 DULIN, DaVISON R 1203 DOGWOOD LN 
28352 DULIN, JAMES M DOQWOOD LANE 
28352 DUNN/ LAURIE L 1201 DOGWOOD LANE 
28352 MCARN, JEFFREY HUGH 501 WILKINSON DR 
28352 MCLEAN, WiLLlAM H BOX 232 

28352 WILLIAMSON, VAN E MORRISON LANE 

28358 BAKER* WILLIAM C ROUTE 1 BOX 130 

25358 CLARK, CLYDE JORDAN 207 W 26 

28358 CLARK, MARY JO 207 W 26TH ST 

28358 GUY, DAVID N JR 2801 SHAW AVE 

28358 JENKINS, CHARLES R III 304 WEST 31ST ST 

28358 JENKINS, JOHN MARSHALL 304 W 3lST ST 

28358 RUTH, HILTON LAMAR III RT 8 BOX 970 

28365 FOX, MICHAEL CEDRIC 923 S CENTER ST 

2S365 WALKER/ LEA RAVENEL P BOX 166 

23372 JONES/ SYBIL ROJTE 2 BOX 403 

28376 GILLIS/ HAROLD LEON JR BOX M 

28379 HUTCHINSON, LEROY P 612 ANSON AVE 

28379 HUTCHINSON, MARY JOANNA 612 ANSON AVE 

28379 HUTCHINSON, ROBERT t JR 612 ANSON AVE 

26379 LANGLEY, AMANDA LYNN 503 LOV£ LANE 

28383 BURNS/ JOHN R BOX 344 

28384 CULBERSON/ CHARLES K JR 708 W SHAW 
2S387 jOHnSON, WILLIAM S jR 140 RIDINQ LANE 
28*01 BALDWIN/ JAMES E 2149 ECHO LANE 
28401 BREnNAN/ ANNE GRANVILLE 2114 S LIVE OAK PKWY 
28401 CHURCHILL* GLENN P 125 DEVONSHIRE LN 
28401 rULENWIDERi DOROTHY C 1801 GRACE ST 

28401 HAY, MARY SARa 1422 COUNTRY CLUB RD 

28401 KIRK/ KENNETH ANDREW 5105 CLEAR RUN DR 

28401 LEE, JESSE THOMAS III 743 TIMBER LANE 

28401 lEHnBERQ, ROBERT E 1839 HAWTHORNE RD 

28401 REIlLY, WILLIAM T III 207 ANN STREET 

28401 SLOAN, TIMOTHY COUNCIL 309 BEACH RD NORTH 

28401 SMITH, MICHAEL L 133ST0NEWALL JACKSON 

28401 WASHBURN, JONATHAN WORTH 1515 MAGNOLIA PL 

28442 MINTZ* MARY M WYCHEWOOD 

28463 GARrELL, THOMAS M 108 FLOYD ST 

28472 SIMMS/ MARK JEFFREY RT 5 BOX 23F 

£85C: KOOmCE/ PHILIP H III 1613 WHITEHALL DR 

2s5cl OwLnS, RONALD F 1904 pAwNEE DRIVE 

2S54C SAUnDEPS, JOSEPH A jR 1017 SICUX DR 

2S551 CLARK, JEFFREY BROTHERS 113 CIRCLE DRIVE 

28557 PhIlLIPS, HERBERT IV I9l3 EVANS ST 

2S560 BENfIElD, RONALD W 107 GLEnBURNIE DR 

28590 MClawhcRN, FREDERICK D ROUTE 1 

2S601 PERKINS, MARTHA JANE BOX if 7 7 

286C1 RANEY/ LEE SUZANNE 1012 14TH AVE DR NW 

28604 GARNER, ANN BUTlER RT 1 BOX 54 



FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FAYETTEVILLE 


NC 


FORT BRAGG 


NC 


CLINTON 


NG 


CLINTON 


NC 


DUNN 


NC 


ELIZABETHTOWN 


NC 


FAIRMONT 


NC 


FAISON 


NC 


HAMLET 


NC 


HAMLET 


NC 


HAMLET 


NC 


LAURINBURQ 


NC 


LAURINBURG 


NC 


LAURINBURQ 


NC 


LAURINBURQ 


NC 


LAURINBURQ 


NC 


LAURINBURQ 


NC 


LAURINBURG 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


LUMBERTON 


NC 


MT OLIVE 


NC 


MT OLIVE 


NC 


PEMBROKE 


NC 


RAEFORD 


NC 


ROCKINGHAM 


NC 


ROCKINGHAM 


NC 


ROCKINGHAM 


NC 


ROCKINGHAM 


NC 


ROWLAND 


NC 


ST PAULS 


NC 


SOUTHERN PINES 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


WILMINGTON 


NC 


HALLSBORO 


NC 


TABOR CITY 


NC 


WHITEVILLE 


NC 


KINSTON 


NC 


KINSTON 


NC 


JACKSONVILLE 


NC 


LAGRANGE 


NC 


MCREHEAD CITY 


NC 


NEW BERN 


NC 


WINTERVILLE 


NC 


HICKORY 


NC 


HICKORY 


NC 


BANNER ELK 


NC 



STUDENT BODY 



WESTERN HIGHLANDS 155 



STUDENT BODY 

28607 HaRrILl^ ^'yRA DEMSE RT 3 BOX 2 BOONE NC 

25612 ASErkETwy^ ANNE B BOX 402 COnOVER NC 

25613 <ELLV/ hlLLIA^-. B 610 2ND AVE Nw COnOVER NC 
28616 Sf^lTH^ MARTHA A P BOX 190 CROSSNORE NC 

28618 MONas^ David OUINN P o BOX 26 DEEP GAP NC 

28619 CROSBY, ROBERT DOUGLAS PCTEaT DRIVE DREXEl NC 
25628 V^EuTON, BARRY CLINE P BOX 625 GLEN ALPINE NC 
28634 PATTERSON^ MARIA MOMCA RCjTE 2 HARMONY NC 
28645 CAUDLE> MARY ANNE 372 EASTOVER CIR NE LENOIR NC 
2S645 HODrE^ ROGER ALAN 703 WiLMCRE DRIVE LENOIR NC 
28645 PORTER.- ANNE ERICKSON 50^ DOGwOOD ST LENOIR NC 
2S651 BU^GARnER/ DEBRA JO RT 1 BOX 575 MILLERS CREEK NC 
2S655 ERViN, SAMUEL JAMES Iv m WOODSIDE PLACE MORGAnTCn NC 
2S655 ERWjN^ JOHN ROBERT 116 MIMOSA HIllS OR MORGANTON NC 
28657 CHURCH^ EARNIE MITCHELL ROjTE 3 NEwLAND NC 
2S658 GAlTHER, WILLIAM H 507 h 7TH ST NEwTON NC 
2S65S ISEnhOwER^ ^ILLIAM D JR 703 SAInT JAMES RD NEwTON NC 
28659 ASDrEwSj PAUL S RT 1 BOx 435 NORTH WIlKESBORO NC 
26662 HC-;.INGShORTHy ROBERT G BOX 85 PINEOLA NC 
2S665 COuCHi MATT LEwIS STAR ROUTE BOX 2 PURlEAR NC 
28673 SC-rif'irZj PAULA BOX 14-r SHERRILLS FORD NC 
28673 SHErrILL> RANDy NORRIS ROU'E 1 BOX 21 SHERRILLS FORD NC 
26677 ANDREWS, WlLLlA" BRYAN 169 PARK ST STaTESVILLE NC 
28677 BROcK/ JaMES VAUGHN JR ^^bO SUMMIT AVE STaTESVILi-E NC 
28677 HAAS, FRANK DAVID 9CS CAROLYN STREET STaTESVIlLE NC 
28677 haRdawaVj DAVID M 322 VALLEY STREAM RD STaTESVILlE NC 

25677 MCKTGO^EPY, AUDREY C 2514 HERITAGE CIR STaTESVIlLE NC 
28677 RICkEPT/ MARGARET P 727 N CENTER ST STaTESVIlLE NC 
28677 ShErRILL, Danmv v, RT 10 BOX 91 STaTESVIlLE NC 
28677 WELLS, CAROL PATRICIA ROUTE 5 STaTESVIlLE NC 

25678 HILL, POBERT C RT 1 BOX 252 STONY POINT NC 
2S69C DEATON, DAVID WAYNE 308 N PRAlEY STREE" VAlDESE NC 
28650 GaRrOJ, ANN C P BOX 159 VAlDESE NC 
2S69C ^ITtlE, AUDREY BROOKS RT 1 BOx 326 A VAuDESE NC 
28657 HARRIS, MICHAEL B 614 S BRIDGE ST WIlKESBORO NC 
2S6S7 CGIlVIE, ELlEn EUGENIA RT 4 BOX 142 WIlKESBORO^ NC 
28704 HESs, MARGARET A 11 FOREST RIDGE DR AROEN nC 
2H7C5 ANDERSON, WILLIAM AVERY " BOX 64 BAKERSVIlLE nC 
£8711 WILSON, SUSAN LYNN 207 RODCDENDRCN AVE BLACK MOUNTAIN NC 
28712 BEARD, BETSY ANN 1050 NEELY RD BREVARD NC 
28712 FOLGER, l^'DIA L RIVER RiDGE BREVARD NC 
28712 FOLGER, jOHN RUSSELL III RIVER RIDGE BREVARD NC 
25712 HOOPER, MARK ALAN p BOX 935 BREVARD. NC 
25712 SNYDER, DAVID J RFD 4 BOX 32 BREVARD NC 
28712 SNYDER, JANICE KEALANI RT 4 BOX 32 BREVARD NC 
28712 kINs-CN, GREGORY CURTIS 107 OAKwDOD DR BREVARD NC 
28714 3aIlEy, JOSEPH TODD P BOX 43 BUPNSVILLE NC 
28714 ELLIOTT, DEBORAH JEAN ROUTE 1 BURNSVlLLE NC 
2S7i7 mcGraDY, MICHAEL JAMES P BOX 365 CASHIERS NC 
28721 SEAGO, RANDAL KELLY ROUTE 1 CLYDE NC 
28723 HOLTZCLAW, KARl w RT 67 BOX 3 CUlLOWHEE NC 
28732 SUTtlES, JERRY LEE ROUTE 3 BOX 336 FLETCHER NC 
28739 COLaN, SUSAN JANE 1341 CHaNTELOUPE DR HENDERSON V I LLE NC 
26739 EhRmaPT, RICHARD P DRAWER 1047 HENDERSON VI LLE NC 
28739 EKL'jND, DEAN ROBERT 1105 WOODMONT DR HENDERSON V I LLE NC 
28735 JUSTUS, STEVEN GEORGE RT 3 BOX 169 HENDERSON V I L^E NC 
28757 DANIEuS, PATRICIA C BOX 218 MOnTREAT NC 
28766 BARnETT, ANGELA KAYE BOX 66 PISQAH FOREST NC 

28777 5JCHA^,A^, KEITh 104 BUCHANAN ST SPRUCE PINE NC 

28778 KEENER, STEPHEN R 135 COllEQE VIEW DP Sr,ANNANCA NC 

28779 COWARD, jAMES < jR 1 NiNTH STREET SYlVA NC 
28779 COWARD,- wIlLIa^ HOOPER 1 OA<WOOD wANE SYlVA NC 
28782 EVErmak, aNTHQNy ALBERT ii3 DOGy,OOD TRAIL TRyON NC 
28786 ClInEj JOE STEVEN 807 GREENVIEW DP WAYNESVILLE NC 
28766 SETSER, EDWARD RAY 107 WOODLAND DRIVE wAYNESVILLE NC 

^rf: 2S789 NASH, DAViD LEE RT 1 BOX 67A WHlTTIER NC 

° 28801 "IGhS^I-^H, JOHN MARSHiLL 62 MaCOn AVE ASHEVIlLE NC 



STUDENT BODY 

2S803 riCLMES^ ROBERT W III 
28SC3 KREmER> kILLlAfi ALFRED 
28303 SAVORY^ ANNE E 
2880^ rORRISCNj ROGER 1CKEE 
cS80« phIlLIPSj D0«IS S 
2580*^ pCTtS> iNDRE*^ JAf'ES 
2S80# SAEnCSER^ MICHAEL E 
2E9C1 BARRETT, JOHN THETFORD 
28502 KELISCHEK/ SABINE ARrtEN 
29C2C TATu'-.j SARA JANE 
2S059 MATmENY, nancy I 
29063 RDBTNSP\> BANKS STAC^ JR 
29115 FKlERSOKj HENRY F jR 
29115 TRIf:BER, JOHN MARSHALL 
29138 KELLER/ DAVID w III 
2915C mALL/ AfANDA SUSAN 
25150 mOSES/ LALRa ElIZABE''''^ 
29180 SAUNDERS/ JANE WYLlE 
29203 FANuIEL/ RENEE DENlSE 
29205 apEEN/ PETER h 

29205 h*VS/ ElISABETm T 
2S205 SCH;.AEFER/ ELLEN DCJQuAS 

25205 SI^S/ LANA HANCOCK JK 

29206 BEACK/ EDWARD D 
29206 B'JHGARDNER/ "MARGARET A 
29206 GEuRSE/ HARK STORK 
29206 huRTIASHAW/ ELlZABETn H 
29206 PITTENGER/ LEEa HARIE 

25206 PORTER/ STEVEN BRYANT 

29206 PUGh, WALTER E 

29206 ROBINSON, TIMOTHY J 

29206 STUART, wAYNE C 

2920fc waItES/ JOHN E 

29302 aSh«<OPE/ JAHES phILI" 

29302 BANE, SUSAN LYNN 

29302 BYRD, HElINDA ANN 

29302 FREtWELL/ SUSAN 

29302 ShInGuER/ ElISaBETw a 

29325 CORnEuSOn, GEORGE h III 

29^01 GRIhSLEY, KILLIAH F 

25*01 SIIPSON, MARY TAGGART 

29«03 fITCHELL, JOANN 

29*^07 KRUGER, STEVEN V 

29'»07 lECcclD, MARY FRANCES 

29«f07 c^EplES, STEPHEN M 

29407 YANDLE, DAVID STEwART 

29''12 CROsEY, CHRISTOPHER JON 

29'»l£ FlUdc, VIRGIL LEE 

29*12 paRkERSGN, JOHN B JR 

29*12 SChwACkE, CHARLES ROBERT 

29**0 HUDSON, JAMES P 

29tS2 DILLON, dEBRA S 

29501 fARjSH, SANDRA 

25501 HOREAL, DEMSE L 

29501 SKlNNER, MOTTE GILLIAN 

29501 YAHMs, jAIES C 

29512 BlInKhCRn/ RICHARD J JR 

29536 CAlN, EDINA ELISE 

29577 ROSEN/ ANDREW JAY 

29601 DAlSLEY, HICHEL 

29607 BURkhOLDER/ WIlLIAH C 

29607 CAuLCCTT, FRANK SNOwDEn 

29607 POE, WILKINS CARTER 

25607 ROSS; ELIZABETH ANN 

29603 GAY^CR, JAHES wIuLlAM RT 3 DUNDEE LANE GREENVIlLE SC 157 



RT 9 10 STCCKWOOD DR 


ASHEVILLE 


NC 


*0 HILLTOP RD 


ASmEVILlE 


NC 


78 FOREST ROAD 


ASHEVILLE 


NC 


* LUCKY LANE 


AShEVIllE 


NC 


*5 EDGEWATER LN 


ASHEVILLE 


NC 


12 HORIZON HILL RD 


ASHEVlLi-E 


NC 


NEW STOCK RD 


ASHEVILLE 


NC 


RT 1 BOX 1*A 


ANDREWS 


NC 




BRaSSTOWN 


NC 


2009 S BRAILSFORD 


CAMDEN 


SC 


BOX 6* 


HOLLY HILL 


SC 


230 ROYAL TOWER DR 


IRMO 


SC 


139 Ln'I^IGSTON TER 


ORANGEBURG 


SC 


1365 CLECKLEY BlVD 


ORANGEBURG 


SC 


307 E CHURCH ST 


SALUDA 


SC 


RT S BOX 232 


SUMTER 


SC 


12 CALHOUN DRIVE 


SUHTER 


SC 


203 MARION AVE 


KiNNSBORC 


SC 


*311 COLONIAL DR 


COlUHBIA 


SC 


7*2 ABElIA RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


1520 HEATHERWOOD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


1*12 f^EDWAY ROAD 


COuUMBiA 


SC 


1320 HAYNESWORTH RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


mi BRENTWOOD DR 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


311 SPRING LAKE RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


^•ll SYLVAN DR 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


1635 ROSLYN DR 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


3*20 wOODBRanCH RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


6905 CLEATON RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


0-162 






1502 MIlFCRD RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


6120 CEDAR RIDGE RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


5906 NORTHRIDGE RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


6211 SATCHELFORD RD 


COLUMBIA 


SC 


257 CART DR 


SPARTANBURG 


SC 


356 HARRELL DR 


SPARTANBURG 


SC 


1009 GLENDaLYN CIR 


SPARTANBURG 


SC 


30 HONTGOMERY DR 


SPARTANBURG 


SC 


210 LAKEWOOD DR 


SPARTANBURG 


SC 


HERRIE OAKS 


CLINTON 


SC 


21 ASHLEY AVENUE 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


10 NEW STREET 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


122 GORDON ST 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


16*5 KCCLAIN ST 


ChaRlESTOTJ 


SC 


1578 HOlTON Pl 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


7 RIVERDALE DR 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


112 MANCHESTER ROAD 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


2056 ST JAHES DR 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


115* FT JOHNSON RD 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


913 REGATTA RD 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


735 FT SUKTER DR 


CHARLESTON 


SC 


BOX 65* 


GEORGETOWN 


SC 


2320 GOlDBUG AVE 


SULLlVANS ISLAND 


SC 


15 YORK STREET 


FLORENCE 


SC 


1*65 WISTERIA DRIVE 


FLORENCE 


SC 


«02 BRETTwOOD 


FLORENCE 


SC 


P C BOX 5326 


FLORENCE 


SC 


1305 HAMLET RD 


BEnNETTSVILLE 


SC 


RFD 1 BOX 275 






1309 E CLEVELAND ST 


DILLON 


SC 


9C05 KINGS ROAD 


MYRTLE BEACH 


SC 


9 PINE FOREST DR 


GREENVILLE 


SC 


15 CRAIGWOCD RD 


GREENVILLE 


SC 


36 VtLERlE DRIVE 


GREENVILlE 


SC 


515 PELHAH RD 


GREENVILLE 


SC 


119-C WOODBRIDGE APT 


GREENVILLE 


SC 


RT 3 DUNDEE LANE 


GREENVILLE 


SC 



STUDENT BODY^Q^Qg lortz^ laura amne rt i box 363 greenville sc 

256C9 ^':APSHALL> HARRISOM L J9 118 LAKECREST DR GREENVILLE SC 

£962i MACCONNACHIE/ NANC"^ 1306 HANOVER RD ANDERSON SC 

29621 TAYlOR> C^-ARLES DUTTON BOX 1&57 ANDERSON SC 

2St2£ PEARSON, JAKES mjchaEL PROVIDENCE PT RT h ANDERSON SC 

29627 DOUGLAS; LEONARD w JR 710 BROwN AVE BElTON SC 

29639 CCPFEY; STEPHEN M BOX 336 DUE WEST SC 

29639 MORRIS/ ROBERT PAUL BOX 55 DUE WEST SC 

29646 lUPO/ DONALD ^ lOf AMHERST DR GREENWOOD SC 

29646 MCClIN'TOCK/ OSCAR MILLER 156 RUTlEDGE RD GREENWOOD SC 

2964b TINKLER/ DAVID KNOX 119 PARTRIDGE RD GREENWOOD SC 

29651 SMITH/ ANDREA DENISE P BOX 665 GREER SC 

29661 CASTEEu/ SALLY NELL VALLEY VIEW- MARIETTA SC 

RIVER Falls 

29673 TURNER/ STEVEN ROGERS ROUTE 3 PIEDMONT SC 

29681 DUBOSE, FRANCES E 406 ASTER DRIVE SIMPSONVILLE SC 

29693 lOVIN/ CRAIG J F BOX 193 WESTMINSTER SC 

29706 BRICE/ JOHN WHITE 114 CRESCENT DRIVE CHESTER SC 

29710 UPCHURChy PATRICIA ANN ''O SUNRISE POINT RD CLOVER SC 

2972C DONaTD> JOHN ORESTE III 130 ROCK SPRING RD LANCASTER SC 

29720 RICHARDS/ JAMES PRIOLEaU P BOX 150 LANCASTER SC 

29730 ANDERSON, ElIZaBETH n 1019 WOODLAND DP ROCK HILL SC 

29730 LEWIS/ LEE ANNE 1730 COlONY ROaD ROCK HiLL SC 

29730 MCAPTHUR/ JOHN R 357 SHURLEY AVE ROCK HILL SC 

2973C SUMwALT/ MARK TARRANT 1162 HERMITAGE RD ROCK HiLL SC 

29730 WORTHY/ PRANCES KAY RT 8 BOX 25 ROCK HILL SC 

29745 BEARD/ DAViD CRAVEN ROjTE 2'B3X 77A1 YORK SC 

29801 CARTER/ MAJOR ERWIN 426 HAMPTON AVE NW AlKEN SC 

29801 LANGFDRD/ HENRIETTA RT 3 BOX 159 AlKEN SC 

29S01 LAW, CHARLES E 716 ROLlINQWOOD RD AlKEN SC 

29801 SUlCH/ PAUL STUART 1015 KERR DR AlKEN SC 

299C2 TRASK/ JAMES HEIDE 119 S HERMITAGE RD BEAUFORT SC 

29902 TRA3K/ JOSEPH LAKE BOX 4lDc BURTON SC 

30002 DEAn, MEREDITH ANNE 886 NOTTINGHAM DR AVONDALE ESTATES GA 

30002 WILDER/ MELODY 1067 LAKEShORE DR AVONDALE ESTATES GA 

30C21 DOWNS/ BERTIS EDWIN Jv 3433 CASA wOODS LN CLARKSTON^ GA 

30030 BaStIN/ SCOTT WAYNE 536 KIRK ROAD DECATUR GA 

30030 BROwK/ BRUCE PERRIN 221 mt vERnON DR DECATUR GA 

30C30 CANDLER/ ClARK ELLISON 3 WiMBERLY CT DECATUR GA 

3D03C ChIlDS/ jane LOUISE 160 RIDLEY CIRCLE DECATUR GA 

3003C EVAMS/ ALEXANDER wiER 735 KIRK ROAD DECATUR GA 

30030 EVAK'S/ JOHN BORDEN JR 735 KIRK RD DECATUR GA 

30030 HLIE> JOHN H 729 KIRk RD DECATUR GA 

30030 hlLL/ DAVID WINGATE 258 E PaRKwOOD RD DECATUR GA 

30030 MCCalL/ ROY KING 1010 SCOTT BLVD DECATUR GA 

APT C-6 

30C3C SANDERS/ FLOYD S 206 UPLAND RD DECATUR GA 

30C35 BJRSON/ CHARLES A 692 N SUPERIOR AVE DECATjR GA 

30033 JACkSON/ JOHN ROBERT 2913 COUNTRY SO LN DECATUR GA 

30033 TAYuOR/ ROBERT A 824 N SUPERIOR AVE DECATUR GA 

30033 TRAwICK, ROBERT 2''79 BURNT LEAF LN DECATUR GA 

30034 MCNEELY/ RICHARD DANIEL 3088 DONAVAN xAY DECATUR GA 
30C6C R0>'/ CLYDE R II 635 BIRCHWOOD LN MARIETTA GA 
30062 BERRY/ BRIAN HOWARD 2923 VIllAGE DR MARIETTA GA 
30062 RCSkOS/ JOHN ERIC 1821 BISHOP LAKE RD MARIETTA GA 
30064 riCLLADAVj WILLIAM E III 389 ST MARYS LN MARIETTA GA 
30064 STEbBInS/ ELLEN RENEE 776 ST MARYS LN Nw MARIETTA GA 
30075 BENNETT/ ROBERT jR 4701 MTn CREEK DR ROSWElL GA 
30CS0 PERRY/ CINDY GAIL 3936 RiDGEwOOD DR SMYRNA GA 
300S3 aOKjns, ROBERT MIC^AEl 5613 HUGH hOwELv. RD STONE MOUNTAIN GA 
30085 haRvEY/ mICHELE ANNE 4258 EXECUTIVE DR STONE MOUNTAIN GA 
30083 NICHOLS/ JAMES G 1150 Ras)KIN ST STONE MOUNTAIN GA 

APT C-6 

30083 SHEPHERD/ CHARLES £ 4201 ABINGDON DR STONE MOUNTAIN GA 

30083 WCMaCK/ SARAh PECK 4027 ^lintkidgE DR STONE MOUNTAIN GA 

30084 BCNsaCK/ TImOTHv aLAn 4311 TUCKER N CT TUCKER GA 
158 300S4 CHRtSTI AN'SEN/ HEIDI E 2511 LAnDEAU CIR TUCKER GA 



SODS'* HAHONEV, THOi'.AS CriAi^LES ^152 CHaTFORD cove TUCKER GA STUDENT BODY 

?OOBS NCEl/ MARGARET eNNE 4930 WOODHURST WAY STONE MOUNTAIN GA 

300SS THOmaSON, SCOTT ANThONY 910 STOSE MOUNTAIN- STONE MOUNTAIN GA 

LITHONIA ROaD 

30133 NOLanD* SAMUEL TAYLOR P BOX 185 DOUGLASVlLLE QA 

SOlS't POSTER/ BRUCE A R R 8 SUMMIT DR DOUGLASVlLLE GA 

301*3 hARE> OLIVIA CACEDIA 213 BIRCH STREET JASPER GA 

3C161 CUNNIN'GHAM/ JOHN R III DARLINGTON SCHOOL ROME Ga' 

30161 GARnER/ jUlIANNE RT 5-BARKEP RD ROME 3A 

30161 GRIZZ-iRDi ROBERT U 1 RIDGEWOOD RD ROME GA 

30161 PAYNE/ HOWARD J RT f CALLlER SPG RD ROME QA 

30161 nILsON^ kATHY jULIA 7 ROBIN STREET ROME GA 

30207 BOYlSTON/ DONYA ANN 1892 SURREv TRAIL COnYERS 6A 

30207 jOHnSTDNj WILLIAM C 729SUGAR CRK TRL RT8 CONYERS GA 

30236 MCDONALD/ ANDREW TERRELL 9725 BROWN ROAD JONESBORO GA 

302'»5 DAPDEN/ BRUCE VAIDEN II o^i ROXBCRO ST L AWRENCEVi LLE QA 

30263 CAMPBELL/ MARGARET f 34 PARKS AVE NEWNAN GA 

30263 GRIF='ITH/ JOHN PAUL 95 QREEnVILLE ST NEwNAN GA 

30263 MURPKEY/ RUTH C 119 LAGRANGE ST NtWNAN GA 

30305 ANDERSON/ PRANCES K 513 CHATEAU DR NW ATLANTA GA 

30305 BRIDGES/ KATHPYN T 3000 HABERSHAM RD NW ATLANTA GA 

30305 BRODME/ NINA ERICHSEN 96 W WESLEY RD Nw ATLANTA GA 

3C3C5 HLlE/ HELEN ClaIRE 363 MANOR RIDGE DR ATLANTA GA 

30305 JACkSCN/ MILDRED KAY 3329 HABERSHAM RD NW ATLANTA GA 

30305 JENNINGS/ RICHARD H III 2620 WOODWARD WAY NW ATLANTA GA 

30305 SIMMS/ ARTHUR B IV 195 VALLE^ RD Nh ATLANTA GA 

30305 STOw/ SARAH ELIZABETH 544 PEACHTREE BATTLE ATLANTA GA 

AVENUE NORTHWEST 

30306 HEARD; JAMES WALLACE 1750 W SUSSEX RD ATLANTA GA 

30307 SCCtT/ THOMAS P III 837 ClI«^TDN ROAD ATLANTA GA 
3C3C7 wITheRSPCON/ TANDa ALLEN 833 CLIFTON RD ATLANTA GA 
3030? NEWBERRY/ CYNTHIA LEE 9C BEVERLV RD NE ATLANTA GA 
30309 NEWBERRY, SUZANNE B 90 BEVERLY ROAD ATLANTA GA 
30309 PAYNE/ ROBERT IRVIN 75 26TH ST NW aTlANTA GA 

P SOX 77293 

30309 YANCEY/ GEORGE B 52 WESTMINSTER DR ATLANTA GA 

30311 SHEaRER/ MIRIAM CLARKSON 3442 STRATFORD RD ATLANTA GA 

30318 CSBORNE/ LARRY SIDNE^ JR 1969 SEABOARD ^L ATuANTA GA 

30319 BELL/ ROBERT S 3710 PEaCHTREE RD NE ATlANTA GA 
30319 LANGMAN, DAVID WluLlAM 1:93 CHAMBORD ATLANTA GA 
30319 MCDOWELL/ THEODORE NOYES **040 E BROOKHAVEN ATLANTA GA 
30319 MANfR, GORDON D 1186 HAMPtqn HAlL ATLANTA GA 
30327 BURIANEK/ OTTD B JR 115 PINE LAKE DR A^^LANTA GA 
30327 CLlF'^ON/ NANCY MARIE 4247 HARROGATE DR NW ATLANTA GA 
30327 COVINGTON/ MATTHEw W 3380E ^'OOD VALLEY RD ATLANTA GA 

30327 DRA<E/ Patricia a 1191 w conway dr n». atlanta ga 

30327 EGLIN/ AiJNE CAROLINE £55 N ISLAND DRIVE ATLANTA GA 

30327 ETHE:RlnGE/ MARGARET ANnE 4715 HARRIS TRAIL ATLANTA GA 

30327 HUS'TER/ MARGARET l 3238 wOOD VAL RD N W ATLANTA GA 

30327 JONES* JC^N Raymond 1475 CAvE ROAD Nk ATLANTA GA 

30327 lIVaDITIS/ jAMES 5 4505 GARMON RD N h ATLANTA GA 

30327 MYRiCK/ -RICHARD S JR 3199 ROCKINGha^i ATLANTA GA 

3C327 CLDEN/ JOHN HENRY Hi #027 GuEN DEVON aTlANTA GA 

30327 RAMOS/ MARY CATHERINE 1095 MT FaRAN ROAD ATlANTa GA 

30327 REED/ JOHN ERNEST III 3005 MARGARET ATLANTA GA 

MITCHELL DR N W 

3C327 TRAVIS/ MARGARET lDVELL 983 DUMBARTON CT Nw ATLANT/ GA 

30328 COChPAN, CHARGES P JR 304 COlEWOOD WAY ATlAN'A Ga 
30328 ERICKSON/ JON RICHARD 7180 DUnHIlL TERR Nw ATLANTA GA 
30328 GEllY/ JOHN ANDREW 5815 NORTHSIOE DR ATLANTA GA 
30328 MARTIN/ SANTFOPD PRANK 211 MT VERNON RD Nw ATLANTA GA 

30328 MUPPHY, JAMES EDWARD III 1105 WINDING CRK TRL ATLANTA GA 
3032S RElD/ SUSAN P 6630W I LL I AMSON OR NE aTlANTA GA 
3032S »-hItaKER, ROBERT " JR 715C BRaNDON MIuL RD ATLANTA QA 

30329 hARriEN/ tIMOThv III lt.05 RANlER FAl.LS DR ATLANTA GA 
30331 PERKlNSy MARIAN L 400H RUTGERS DR SW aTlANTa GA 

3C338 BAKER/ SUZANNE CARTER 1757 N SPRINGS DR DUnWOODY GA 159 



STUDENT BODY 

30335 BARRETT, SIDNEY RAY JR 1220 TYnECASTlE WAY ATLANTA GA 
30338 BROWN/ GEORGE W IV 1632 DAI^DN COURT DUNwOODY GA 
30338 FRiTTSi STEPHEN RAYMOND 1051 WINDING BRCH CR DUNWOODY GA 
30338 HARRISON, JOHN ROBERT S0l5 MONTICELLO DUNWOODY GA 
30338 NICHOLS, JOSEPH J JR '♦SS^ CHADWELL LN DUNWOODY GA 
3033E QUAY, "-ICHAEL HENRY 1551 CmaDWELL CT DUNWOODY GA 

30336 SCPIANO, PATRICIA G R 5054 N PEACHTREE RD DUNWOODY GA 
30338 STEwART, BRENDA MARIE 1344 MARTINA DR DUNWOODY GA 
3C33B WRIGHT, ANGELA HOPE 8310 HEWLITT RD DUNWOODY GA 
30338 WRIqHT, BARBARA MARIE 8310 HEWLETT DUNWOODY QA 
30239 ADAMS, JAMES ARTHUR JR 43iO BROOKVIEW DR NW ATLANTA QA 
30535 CARPEROS, kILLIAM ERNEST 2933 ^ACES LK DR Nw ATLANTA GA 

30340 CRCSLAnD, EDWARD M 253B ANDOVER DR DORAVILLE GA 

30341 MCRRISSEY, BRIAN JOHN 4652 PEELER MILL CT CHAMBLEE GA 

30342 GLADDEK'i PHILIP KNCX 5514 SHERRELL DR NE ATLANTA GA 
30342 HARRIS, JEFFREY ALSTON' 58 BLACKLAND ROAD ATLANTA GA 
30342 SHEARER, ROBERT G 3442 STRATFORD RD ATLANTA GA 
30342 WILKINSON, DANIEL D III 385 CASTLERIDQE DR ATLANTA GA 
30344 jONeS, DAVID LANIER 3436FR1NCE GEORGE ST EAST POINT GA 

30344 RAMSEY, OLIVER WENDELL 2280 DODSON DR EAST POINT GA 
30544 TAYLOR, WiLLlAM J JR 2730 DU<E OF EAST ^OINT GA 

GLOUCESTER 

30345 BOWMAN, CATHERINE L 2686 LESLIE DR ATLANTA GA 
30345 MCNAIR, NANCY LYNN 1877 MERCEDES CT ATLANTA GA 
30345 TAYLOR, FRANCES BLAND 2669 RANGEWOOD CT NE ATLANTA GA 
3035^ PURCELL, TIMOTHY PORTER 254 COLORADO AVE HAPEVILLE GA 
30401 BUCKLEY, JEFFREY DEAN P BOX 727 SWAINSBORO GA 
30401 FAlPCLCTH, DYLAN TRENT ROUTE 2 SWAlNSBORO GA 
30434 BRCwN, CAROLYN SIMS 212 FOREST STREET LOUISVILLE GA 
30458 ALLEN, FRANCIS WALDO JR NOTTINGHAM TRAIL STaTESBORO GA 
30458 SMITH, WILLIAM R JR F BOX 10 STaTESBORO GA 
3C5C1 BROwN, POGER H JR 3501 EDGEWQCD CIR GAINESVILLE GA 
3C501 GElGER, WlLLlAM MARlIN 715 MTN VIEW CIRCLE GAINESVILLE GA 
30501 lOEb, CHRISTOPHER w 2745 NORThlAKE RD GAINESVILLE GA 
30501 OTEy, LISA H 1485 ENCTA AVE NE GAINESVILLE GA 
30501 WILSON, FRANKLIN C JR 760 HILLSIDE DR GAINESVILLE GA 
30529 GRiFFETh, JACK THURMON RT 2 JEFFERSON RD COMMERCE-' GA 
30577 HAYj HERRICK R 150 GLEnWOOD RD TOCCOA GA 
30577 MCMuRRY, WILLIAM D RT 2 BOX 230 TOCCOA GA 
306C1 BaRmES, GARY ALAN 107 GEORGETOWN DR ATHENS GA 
30601 CRANE, STEPHEN M 160 HOLl^ LANE ATHENS GA 
30601 ChAw'^ORD, CLARENCE W JR 1021 N CHASE ST ATHENS GA 
30601 STRoBEl, GEORGE LEWIS II 620 RIVrRMONT DRIVE ATHENS GA 
30620 YEARwOOD, JAMES D P BOX 222 BETHLEHEM GA 
30622 EEErlEY, RONALD wAYnE RR 1 BOx 12-A BOGART QA 
30643 ROOkS, mark CURTIS 109 BROWN ST HARTWELL GA 
30668 EChhlS, GlEN SCOTT RT 1 BOX 28 TIGNALL GA 
3068C FARMER, JAMES HAROLD JR 113 OLEVIA ST WINDER GA 
307C1 «INklE, JOSEPH RAYMOND ROUTE 1 CALHOUN GA 
308C9 BOWSHER, JAMES EDWiN 9106 CHALICE CIR EVANS GA 
30S28 SMITH, STEVEN THOMAS BOX 386. WARRENTON GA 
30904 BARNES, CAROLYN TERESA 506 HENDERSON DR AUGUSTA oA 
30904 BLAlOCK, CLARENCE A 403 ASHLAND DR AUGUSTA GA 
3090't BuAlOCk, kIlLIaM aLLEN C 403 aSHlAND DR AUGUSTA GA 
30904 BRYAN, EMILIE WATKINS 3041 PARK AVE AUGUSTA GA 
30907 HUNTER, ROBERT w III 300 NORTH B AUGUSTA GA 
31021 ROChE, WILLIAM P III 1706 GREYSTONE RD DUBLIN GA 
31061 GATES, JAMES IRWIN 1725 CARDINAL RD Ml LLEDGE V I LLE GA 
31201 HUTCHINGS, WiLulAM S II 3263 IMPERIAL DR MACON GA 
31201 wRiGHT, JOHN P 808 BOULEVARD MACON GA 
3l40e BRiTT, MICHAEL LEON 407 OLD MILL RD SAVANNAH GA 
31501 CHESTER, CATHIE LOUISE 1309 SHAWNEE DR WAYCROSS GA 
31501 Clark, jAMES DANIEL 1409 SATlLLA BLVD WAYCROSS GA 
31501 HARt, JON LEE P BOX 624 WAYCROSS GA 
31501 HAV, c^AsjClS M JR RT 5 BOX 137 WAYCROSS GA 
31501 JACOBS, LESLIE L 207 W ONEIDA ST WAYCROSS GA 

loU 3:501 REES, EDwARD CONWAY I3l0 ATLANTIC AVE WAYCROSS GA 



STUDENT BODY 

31533 DAViS^ WILLIAM HENRY 
31601 PEEPLES^ HENRY w III 
31601 SULlIVANj berry J JR 

31707 ER«'iN> Charles ferrell 

31707 FOUNTAIN^ MARTHA TDY 
31723 ARNOLD/ DAVID JEFFERSON 
31730 BATemAN/ FREDRICK L JR 
31730 MCNEILL/ NORA P 
3175C MCCORD/ DAVID SIKES 
31768 CARbYSHIRE/ GLEN MASON 
31768 TYNDALL/ MARK YOUNG 
31792 MILLER/ F RICHARD JR 
31816 REEDY/ W GEORGE JR 
31833 JOHNSON/ CLIFFORD P 
31906 FAY/ ClIFTON CARTWRIGHT 
31906 FLOWERS/ GEORGE C 
31906 GaDdY/ CHARLES THOMAS JR 
31906 GROgaNi LEE R JR 
31906 SMISSON/ PATSY L 
31S07 hILlINGHAM/ JOHN MARK 
32058 FRANKLIN/ BENITA 
32084 UPChuRCH/ TRACY WILSON 
32084 WEBB/ JOSEPH RICHARD 
32204 BOFTELL/ BEVERLY M 

32207 CHRISTIE/ NOPTCN BRaDlEY 

32208 WESTON/ BENNITA L 
3221C GRAHAM/ mERILYN ALLEN 

32210 WILLIAMS/ CaVIO FINlEY 

32211 SElPLE/ JOHN WILlIAM jr 
32217 FRISINA/ Charles STEVEN 
32233 MORROW/ JEFFERSON WOOD 
32303 KADISCN/ PAULA 
32303 MARTIN/ DAVID RiAN JR 
32303 MDTtICE/ JOHN PHILLIP 

32303 MOTTICE/ KRISTINE ANN 
32303 ROBINSON/ BRYAN DAVID 
32303 ROBlNSONy CAROL SUSAN 
32303 SEChREST/ STEVEN 
32303 SMITH/ ANDREW LEE 
32303 SMITH/ DAVID WiLLlS 
32303 WATT/ CAROLYN LOUISE 
32303 WATT, JAMIE ELLEN 
32320 FITZGERALD/ STEVEN F 
32351 MCMILLAN/ VICTOR M 
32351 WOODWARD/ FRANK NORRIS 
32351 WOODWARD/ KaThERINE L 
32401 COLLINS/ JOHN JACKSON 
32446 POStMA/ nancy E 
32446 WILLIAMS/ ANDREW B II 
32503 BARrINEaU/ CHARLES M 
32503 BELL/ KENNETH BRADLEY 
32503 PALMER/ ROBERT C III 
32506 MITCHELL/ ROBERT J 
32601 BARNARD/ DAVID WALLER 
32601 CLAYTON/ FRED BOWDEN 
32601 STIeFELj JOHN RaABE JR 
32605 KAFOGLIS/ MARY K 
32o07 KISSAM, BARBARA IVEY 
32628 GRIkER/ KENNETH D 
32670 KELlS/ ROSS ALAN 
32720 ocliCKE/ TIMOTHY ALFRED 
32731 TROuT/ TQRENCE JOHN JR 
32734 MUNgER/ MICHAEL CURTIS 
32748 DAVIS/ BRADLEY W 

32748 ELMER/ LAWRENCE WlLLlAM ..„_ ,. , „, .„ _, ^^, .„ 

32751 CLPtIS/ CYNTHIA ALLYNE 3 SHADOW LN MAITLAND FL ^ " ' 



GOLF CLUB ROAD 


DOUGLAS 


GA 


2442 MEaDOWBROOK DR 


VAuDCSTA 


GA 


703 GORNTO ROAD 


VAlDOSTA 


QA 


2403 TEMPLE AVE 


ALBANY 


GA 


4001 OLD DAWSON RD 


ALBANY 


GA 


BOX 326 


BLAKELY 


GA 


P BOX 174 


CAMILLA 


GA 


180 MCARTHUR DR 


CAMILLA 


GA 


RT 2 BOX 215 


FITZGERALD 


GA 


903 SECOND ST SE 


MOULTRIE 


GA 


105 LOBLOLLY RD 


MOULTRIE 


GA 


1208 RIFTWOOD LANE 


THOMASVILLE 


GA 


P BOX 573 


MANCHESTER 


GA 


P BOX 533 


W POINT 


QA 


2608 AUBURN AVE 


COLUMBUS 


GA 


1233 FOREST AVE 


COLUMBUS 


GA 


3466 MOnTICELLO DR 


COLUMBUS 


QA 


3431 SUEMACK DR 


COLUMBUS 


GA 


1615 SUMMIT DR 


COLUMBUS 


GA 


3354 CDWETA DR 


COLUMBUS 


QA 


" BOX 31 


LAWTEY 


FL 


321 OGLETHORPE BLVD 


ST AUGUSTINE 


FL 


248 ESTRADA AVE 


ST AUGUSTINE 


FL 


lOOE BARRS ST 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


1016 HOLLY LN 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


3103 MONTCALM DR 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


4615 NOTTINGHAM RD 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


4928 ORTEGA FOREST 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


2334 ROGERO RD 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


2355 SARaGOSSA 


JACKSONVILLE 


FL 


10 TENTH ST VILLA 52 


ATLANTIC BEACH 


FL 


826 LAKE SHORE 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


3834 LONGFORD DR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


31128 MIDDLEBROOKS 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


CIRCLE 






3112 MIDDLEBROOKS CR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


613 PIEDMONT DR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


613 PIEDMONT DR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


2921 COlDSTREAM DR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


1007 LUCY STREET 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


1007 LUCT STREET 


TALLAHASSEE 


PL 


2212 ELLlCOTT 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


2212 ELLlCOTT DR 


TALLAHASSEE 


FL 


79-6TH ST 


APPALACHICOLA 


FL 


616 N CALHOUN ST 


OUINCY 


FL 


P BOX 1085 


OUINCY 


FL 


ROUTE 2 BOX 183 


OUINCY 


FL 


P BOX 517 


PANAMA CITY 


FL 


ROUTE 3 


MARIANNA 


FL 


407 2ND AVE 


MARI ANNA 


FL 


2144 COPLEY DR 


PENSACOLA 


FL 


2105 MORINQSIDE DR 


PENSACOLA 


FL 


2910 N MAGNOLIA AVE 


PENSACOLA 


FL 


4977 PRIETO DRIVE 


PENSACOLA 


FL 


1725 Sw 6TH TERR 


GAINESVILLE 


FL 


3580 Sw 63RD LN 


GAINESVILLE 


FL 


3810 NW 39TH AVE 


GAINESVILLE 


FL 


1928 NW 71ST ST 


GAINESVILLE 


FL 


2505 N W 7 ROAD 


GAINESVILLE 


FL 


P BOX 35b 


CROSS CITY 


FL 


2012 NE 40TH AVE 


ccala 


FL 


BIO PINE TREE COURT 


DElAND 


FL 


F BOX 473 


FRUITlAND PARK 


FL 


P BOX 4 


GOTHA 


FL 


P BOX 926 


LEESBURG 


FL 


1108 N PALMETTO ST 


LEESBURG 


FL 


3 SHADOW LN 


MAITLAND 


FL 



STUDENT BODY 

32751 wOCk, ROBER' DANIEL 1131 BANBURY TRAIL MAITLAND FL 

32751 STEPHEKSi waYlAND CHAD 2515 CHaNUTE TRaIL MAITLAND Fl 

32760 LU"MUS> STANFORD JAMES P BOX 1^6 OAKLAND FL 

32771 CRUrLt^j GAIL L^N P C BOX B*8 SANFORD FL 

32778 BOGgUSj DAN ARGIN 514 LAKE DORA DR TAVARES FL 

3278C EaRnESTj ROBERT G 2735 HIlLCREST TITUSVILLE Fl 

327gC ^AClEAN^ JONATHAN LEE 3531 NElSON PL TiTUSVlLLE FL 

32789 CbTwBERTSON, GILBERT J 200 ST ANDREW'S BLVD WINTER PARK FL 

32785 TAYlOR^ KEVIN TmOMAE 1 *• 1 1 TUSCANY WINTER PARK FL 

32803 BEARDALLy JOHN' FORD 25lc SHREWSBURY RD ORLANDO FL 

32803 HEDkICK^ JOHN ». 172? REPPaRD RD CRlANDO FL 

32805 rtALLACEj TERRaZZO 1635 AARON AVENUE ORlANDO FL 

32806 CCFfEYj BRIAN ROLAND 955 BERWYN RD ORlANDO Fl 
32809 RITtMANICj MARK B 59363 CaSA DEL REY ORLANDO FL 
32505 YOUNG/ CORWIN W 5V65 LK JESSAMINE DR ORLANDO FL 
32931 WALKER/ JAMES ANDREW 52 RlVERVIEw lN COCOA BEACH FL 
32951 DINDAi ROBIN DEAN RT 3 AlA BOX 215 S MELBOURNE BCh Fl 
33062 MAYER/ ROBERT M 111 N BtACH BLVD POM^ANC BEaCm FL 
3306A B0ME> JULIA LYNN 2500 NE 41ST ST LIQHThOUSE PT Fl 
33065 MANSFIELD/ WiLLlAM G 3575 bRO<EN WOODS DR CORAL SPRINGS FL 
33127 GILBERT/ PHILlIP 752 NW a7 TERRACE MIAMI FL 
33142 PYLES/ CRAIG ROBERT 1915 NW 57TH ST MIAMI FL 

33157 POLLOCK/ KENNETH E 9470 SW 170 ST 102 MIAMI FL 

33158 eONOURANT/ CHARLES B 13995 SW 72 COURT MIAMI ' FL 
33158 YOUnG/ RODNEY B III 6320 SW 144TH ST MIAMI FL 
33173 aBReU/ LUIS ALBERTO 6301 SW 94TH AVE MIAMI FL 
33301 DElBERT/ RICHARD IRVIN 1100 SE 6TH ST FT LAUDERDALE FL 
33309 DCNiHOEj WENDY L 4003 NW 38 AVE FT LAjDERDALE FL 
33314 CAMerrA/ PAMELA G 6800 SW 43RD CT DAViE FL 
33316 FLAvELL/ GEORGE E JR 1958 SE 24TH AVE FT LAUDERDALE FL 

33316 HUMMEL/ TERRY ALAN 1028 S E 13TH TERR FT LAUDERDALE FL 

33317 CUNnINGmaM^ SUSAN E 4461 NW 3RD CT PLANTATION Fl 
33334 SMITH/ MICHAEL ALAN 4401 NE 15TH AVE FT LAUDERDALE FL 
33406 CLARKSCN/ ROBERT wARREN 8017 PiNE TREE LN W PALM BEACH FL 
33406 PIPPIN/ SUZANNE MARIE 1321 RAnCMETTE RD W PALM BEACH FL 
33444 SCHMIDT/ DAVID W 514 IBIS DRIVE DElRAY BREACH FL 

33444 WILDER/ CARNEY LEROy jr 25i NE 16 ST DEFRAY BEACH FL 

33445 AJKFR/ MATTHEW DAVID 1301 SW 20TH TERR DElRAY BEACH Fl 
33450 NEIlL/ RICHARD V JR RT 2 BOX 2C50 FORT PIERCE FL 
33505 SCHFRMTR, ROBER' CHARLES 7610 DESCto MEM 5LVD BRaDENTON FL 
33=16 DANIEL/ JANE AILENE 100 CSCeOLA ROAD BELLEAlR FL 
33516 HICKERT/ PATRICK J 2258 GROVEWOOD RD CLEARWATER FL 
33516 hRADESKY/ MARIA JEAN 16lS BARRY ST CLEARWATER FL 
33516 KILGORE/ SIDNEY WAl^IS 105 wILlADEL DR BElLEAIR tl 
33528 OLiCK/ ELIZABETH ANNE 1198 FAIRWAY DR DUNEDIN FL 
33555 kOPEL/ JAMES JOSEPH jR 336 wINFlELD WAY NOkOMIS Fl 
33563 KRAvET/ JOHN MYRON 3 EAGLE LANE PALM HARBOR FL 
33563 NIKOLAL'S/ ANN N 1501 wInDING CRK RD PAl'i HARBOR FL 
33589 THOmaS/ RICHARD D JR P BOX 3162 HOLIDAY Fl 
33589 TCYF/ Pi-ILLIP COGAN 17 TaRPCN DRIVE TARPON SPRINGS FL 
33603 DCSaL/ MICHAEL L 502 W HILDA ST TAMPA FL 
33606 LiNs, DONALD MICHAEL 561 MADERIA TAMPA FL 
33606 lYLES/ JOHN S jR 560 BOSPHOROUS AVE TAMPA FL 
33704 MICHAEL/ LAURA MARIE 792 31ST AVE NE ST PETERSBURG FL 
33712 MCClURE/ PAMELLA ANNE 4325 50TH TERRACE S ST PETERSBURG FL 
33803 HEATH/ FOSTER EUGENE JR 2112 CAROLINA AVE LAKELAND FL 
33830 S"^lDHAM/ JEFFREY » 1135 MARIPOSA AVE BARTOw FL 
33901 BANKS/ POLAND W III 1100 ACuA LANE FORT MYERS FL 
33901 SUTLER/ TERI ANNE 1206 SHADOW LN FORT MYERS FL 
33901 O'CONNOR/ JOSEPH w 1360 AlHAMBRa DF FORT MYERS FL 
33901 PACK/ ROBERT ^ III 1250 FlORIDA AVE FORT MYERS FL 
33901 VAUGHAN/ DAVID C 303S MCGREGOR BLVD FORT MYERS FL 
33501 VEPwEST/ MiCHAEi. SCOTT 6928 OLD WHISKEY "DRT MYERS FL 

CREEK DRIVE 

33905 BOLLINGER/ BRUCE EDwARD RT 1 BOX 439 A FT MYERS FL 

33905 ikOCdaRD/ STEVE wADE RT i i, BOX 431 FORT MYERS Fl 

339«tO deanj Elizabeth anne 925 wedge drive naples fl 



162 



339*C Lr"^LE/ JAMES AlBERT III 326 RIDGE DR -" 

SSS^cC Tlf^FANVj SCOTT EDWARD 370 RUDDER RD 

35010 FOr, JA^^E:S SOLLlE 50fc MAGnOuIA DR 

35C1C HAYmES/ RANDALL STARK 1430 HIlLABEE RD 

35209 JACkSONj DONALD S 1108 IREDElL CIRCLE 

352i3 EADnA",/ WALKER PERCY m ioi LAKE DRIVE 

35213 hOLT/ DOuGlAS ALLEK 3020 STERLING RD 

35213 RISER/ JOHN BYRON 109 CRESTWOOD DR 

35213 TERRY/ wILLlAr: A 236 BEECH CIR 

35213 YElLDINGy RALPH HOWARD 8 MONTROSE CIRCLE 

35215 KlEp^ ANGELA 205 DORR DRIVE 

35222 SLAUGHTER/ MYLES P 810 LiNWOOD RD 

35223 hICkS/ guy M HI 3740 ROCKHILL RD 
35223 WHITE/ DEWEY ANDERSON 2301 COUNTRY CLUB PL 
35243 POOL/ JAMES MARION 3418 MOSS BROOK LN 
35401 CARLISLE/ WILLIAM G 8 BUENA VISTA 
35401 TAYLOR/ DAVID KEY 2729 44 AVE EAST 
35'.01 TAYlOR/ JARRED OTIS II 2729 44TH AVE E 
35501 OLIVER/ REBECCA 900 9TH AVENUE 
35601 PARKS/ MADELON JEAN 2506 COLLEGE ST SE 
35601 RIChTER/ DON C 2306SPRI NGDALE RD SE 
3564C STAlLWCRTH/ LAVOISIER J 521 N BETHEL 
35801 BAIlEY/ DAVID J 14ii MONTERREY DR 
35801 COwART/ STEVEN LANHAM 2203 DERUSSEv RD 

35801 ROBERTSON/ JAMES E JR 2207 ANNANDALE RD 

35802 "AMmONS/ GREGORY wAYNE £706 EDGEHILL DR 
36111 BRYaK/ JUDKINS MATHEWS £7l6 ASH;.AWN DR 
36420 DONALDSON/ DAVID H 401 MONTGOMERY ST 
36420 SAWaDA/ MARY ELLEN BOX 1066 
36467 SELLARS/ WiLLlAM w SELLaRS DRIVE 
36606 WISEMAN/ NORMA CAROLE 255*» N DElWOOD DR 
56607 DILl/ STEPHEN REEVES 293 WINQPIELD DR 
36608 WATfgRD/ wAlTER h JR 392^ PEmBROCKE AVE 
36701 AlIeON/ CELIA FONTAINE 119 LAND LINE RD 
36"'01 MCCULLY/ ROBERT A JR 409 CAlSSON DR 
36801 LAZenSy, AUDREY J 1206 MORRIS AVE 
37027 COOPER/ CORTEZ A III 2 PADDOCK PLACE 

RIVER Oaks 

37027 FAY/ RICHARD EaRL P BOX 412 

37138 CRANE/ JAMES MONTGOMERY 1203 RIVERSIDE RD 

37214 LASlEY/ RCBER'!' LCC<E 2615 DAVIDWOOD CT 

37215 FRIESINGER/ S ChRIS III 3000 HOBBS RD 
3722C BRDwN/ STANTON C 5342 OVERTON ROAD 
3735C BRIGHT/ GEORGE THOMAS 118 N HERMITAGE 
37550 CALDWELL/ TINA CATHElL 1001 SCENIC HIGHWAY 
37377 LANDIS/ CATHERINE E 3007 E 3R0W ROAD 
3740* YOOO/ STEVEN HENRY 520 N CREST RD 
37411 MACdONALD/ MYlES aNDRE^. 113 WOODLAWN RD 
37411 STILL/ CHARLES K jR 121 RIDGESIDE RD 
37415 STiHSON/ REBECCA E 1044 MEaDOWLAKE RO 
37421 CLABOJGH/ JACK DUANE 1305 PHYLLIS LN 
37421 DJCkETT/ mark PRESTON 1700 SKYLINE DRIVE 
37601 ROARK/ MARY uAWN 13;1 WOODLAND AVE 
37620 COwAN/ HANSON BUFORD 153 INDIAN TRAIL 
37620 GREEN/ ElIZaBETo ADaIR 105 BJTlER DRIVE 
3762C REUnING/ JaKiES STONE JR 100 i_ICK BRANCH RD 
37660 PETERS/ JAMES BARTON 1259 lInVIlLE ST 
37b60 TCDD/ CARTER REID 1322 WATAUGA ST 
37763 SwEeNEV; DAVID ALAN 1307 DOGWOOD DR 
37801 HAYnES/ WILLIAM j II 106 CANDORA ROAD M 
37S14 HCLHES/ ELIZABETH ANN 1121 w 7Tm N ST 
37917 OvErTON/ THOMAS JAY 2312 ANTIETAM RD 
379i8 hGODALL/ HUNTER EARl RT 2 GREENWELL RD 
37919 DUNCAN/ PHlLiP DAVID 245 GENEVA ROAD 
37919 MONROE/ JOHN WILSON III 611 WHIRLAWAY CIR 

37919 WALL/ SCCTT WHELAND 4110 TOwANDA TRAlL . 

37920 WiLLlAHC, IFCR RAlNIS 3117 MOnTLAKE DR KNQXVlLLE TN 163 



NAPLES 


FL 


NAPLES 


PL 


ALEXANDER CITY 


AL 


ALEXANDER CITY 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


BIRMINGHAM 


AL 


TUSCALOOSA 


AL 


TUSCALOOSA 


AL 


TUSCALOOSA 


AL 


JASPER 


AL 


DECATUR 


AL 


DECATUR 


AL 


HARTSELLE 


AL 


HUNTSVILLE 


AL 


huntsville 


AL 


HUNTSVILLE 


AL 


HUNTSVILLE 


AL 


MONTGOMERY 


AL 


ANDALUSIA 


AL 


ANDALUSIA 


AL 


OPP 


AL 


MOBILE 


AL 


MOBILE 


AL 


MOBILE 


AL 


selma 


AL 


SELMA 


AL 


OPELIKA 


AL 


BRENTWOOD 


TN 


BRENTWOOD 


TN 


OLD HICKORY 


TN 


NASHVILLE 


TN 


NASHVILLE 


TN 


NASHVILLE 


TN 


LOOKOUT MTN 


TN 


LOOKOOUT MTN 


TN 


SIGNAL MOUNTAIN 


TN 


CHATTANOOGA 


TN 


CHATTANOOGA 


TN 


CHATTANOOGA 


TN 


Chattanooga 


TN 


CHATTANOOGA 


TN 


CHATTANOOGA 


TN 


JOHNSON CITY 


TN 


BRISTOL 


TN 


BRISTOL 


TN 


BRISTOL 


TN 


KINGSPORT 


TN 


KINGSPORT 


TN 


KINGSTON 


TN 


MARYVILLE 


TN 


MORRISTCWN 


TN 


KNOXVILLE 


TN 


KNOXVILlE 


TN 


KNOXVILLE 


TN 


KNOXVILLE 


TN 


KNOXVILLE 


TN 


KNOXVILLE 


TN 



STUDENT BODY 

37922 KEENER^ MARY LYNNE 305 GOVERNORS LANE KNOXVILLE TN 

38017 SMiThi STEVEN RICHARD 156 WEST POPLAR COlLIERVILLE TN 

380*6 ^^ALlEV, page BLAKESLEE hWY 57 LAGRANGE TN 

38112 HL'TtER/ RANDOLPH LYONS 215 BUENA ViSTA MEMPHIS TN 

38*01 DALE/ FRANK K WIlLIAMSPORT PIKE COLUMBIA TN 

3666E GULlEDGE/ WAYNE C 2C8 S HEARD ST SENATOBIA MS 

40059 BRYiNj STANTON T 6701 JOHN HANCOCK PL PROSPECT KY 

*0059 jCNESi EDWIN SINCLAIR 6928 WYTHE hIll CIR PROSPECT KY 

40205 MARsh> ELINORE DOROTHY 2205 SPEED AVENUE LOUISvILLE KY 

40222 CLARK/ JOE FRANCIS 5839BRITTANY WDS CIR LOUISVIlLE KY 

40222 CORnE^^T/ DENVER B III RT l SPRING FARM LOUISVILLE KY 

40222 LIESEGANG/ GLEN ROBERT 3102 LONGFORD LN LOuISVIllE KY 

40222 WHITTLE/ ELIZABETH LYNN 3514 SORRENTO AVE LOuISvILLE KY 

•»0353 RATlIFt^ BYRAM NEWTON 315 N SYCAMORE ST MT STERLING KY 

40361 HAGaN/ JOHN SCOTT RDJTE 4 PARIS KY 

•fCSSl TA^BCTT/ lINDA 3 16 HAMPTON AVE WINCHESTER KY 

40502 CORnISh, JAMES A 1236 ELDEMERE RD LEXINGTON KY 

41311 hOLuON, THOMAS K BOX 327 BEaTTYVILLE KY 

42071 wATsON/ kATHERYN CECILIA 8l4 OLivE ST MURRAY KY 

42301 LOVETT/ JOHN w 1120 GRIFFITH AVE OwENSBORO KY 

42501 BCDnE/ JAMES WHITSITT 302 CuEMENTS AVE SOMERSET Kv 

43126 THOMPSON/ HAL CURTIS 2002 N£w MARKET CT GROVE CITY OH 

43212 MAClEOD/ PATRICIA ANN 1157 PARKWAY N COLUMBUS. Oh 

43302 DOYlE/ SALLY E 874 CENTRAL DR MARION OH 

43606 lEWJS/ JOHN G 2029 ORCHARD RD TOLEDO OH 

44092 RAK, ALAN DOUGLAS 1857 E'IPIRE ROAD WICKLIFFE OH 

44136 waSsEN/ RICHARD E 19285 IDLEWOOO TRL STRONGSVILLE Oh 

44313 Vj JOHN EDWARD MARTIN 2262 CHATHAM RD AKRON OH 

445i2 SICh/ JEFFREY j 739 aNNaWAN LANE YOUNQSTOWN OH 

44601 RUBY/ TwoMAS ORLAND 521 OVERLOOK DR ALLIANCE OH 

44691 CEBUL/ FRANK A III 1141 FOREST DR WCOSTER OH 

44706 CCXj ARNOLD KEVIN 2566 SARATOGA SW CANTON OH 

44709 BARR/ TIMOTHY S 1530 RiDGEwAY PL CANTON OH 

44720 SKIbBENS/ DAVID W 1110 SUNSET N CANTON OH 

44811 KING/ ROBERT PHILLIP RT 1 4633 PRAIRIE RD BEllEVUE OH 

44905 ELLISON/ DAVID R 1570 SASSAFRAS DR MANSFIELD^ OH 

•.5C13 RAUCK/ RICHARD L 217 REISTER DR HAMILTON OH 

45227 wirlTE/ ALICE BONNER 3'11 PETCSKE>' AVE CINCINNATI OH 

4523C DAVjS/ wACK Chris 6937 WHIPPODRWILL CINCINNATI OH 

45235 HALES, LOUIS S JR 4068 S^RINGRCCK CINCINNATI Oh 

45242 SNOw/ ROBERT AN'fHONY 9540 RAVEN LN CINCINNATI OH 

45243 BREwSTER/ LEE CAROL 5155 IVyFaRM RD CINCINNATI OH 
45431 SC"aFER/ JOHN MICHAEL 2C76CRYSTAL MARIE DR DAYTON OH 
45662 COVERT/ thOMAS SAMUEL 3525 ShERIDAN RD PORTSMOUTH Oh 
46131 yCUnG/ MATTHEW GlENN 1091 E aDaME drive FRaNKLIN IN 
4622C BR^AN'/ THOMAS TAYLOR jR 6615 wlNNCCK DR INDIANAPOLIS IN 
46383 GROmlEY/ COlIN MARSHAL 229 wEBlOS TRaIL va;.paraISO IN 
*65i4 LA&AK/ ChaRuES JOHN 1505 lAWNDALE RD ELKHAR"' IN 
46952 ANDERSONi BRUCE ALLEN 120? ELM LN MARION IN 
47**6 haRdman, MlChAEL THOMAS 1122 WARREN ST MITCHELL IN 
4800S CuFe-E, STEVEN PAUL 31335 f< CHElTON DR BIR^'.INGHAM MI 
48010 HALTON, RIC-iARD C 4518 BROUGHTON DR BIRMINGHAM MI 
48062 EnPJGHT/ ROBERT A III 36261 MADISON RICHMOND MI 
48640 MAlNES/ RONALD D 5909 EVERGREEN MIDLAND Ml 
45823 ENGtlSn/ DANA LEIGH 6230 BROOKLlNE CT EAS"' LANSING MI 
49C15 BARKER/ SHERRY LONG WAhwahTaYSEE Way BATTLE CREEK MI 
49349 REIgEL/ ERNEST WILLIAM F BOX 264 WHITE ClOUD MI 
49506 BUSCH/ JOHN MICHAEL 638 MANHATTAN RD SE GRAND RaPIDS mi 
53151 CAPlSON/ JOHN EDWARD 12524 n NEEDHam DR NEw BERLIN Wl 
55S12 SANjrORC/ MARTHA lOjISE 3112 E 1ST STREET DULUTH MN 
57369 BOBeRTZ/ CHaRlES ARNOuD P BOX 176 PLATTE SD 
60045 BRCwN/ NANCY RIChaRDSOn 965 CASTLEGATE CT uAKE FOREST IL 
60091 PtPZ/ ROBERT RUDOLPh 1040 HIBBaRD RO wIlMETTE IL 
60120 RISlEV/ STEVEN AUDlEY 682 SLADE AVE ELGIN IL 
60187 FIDeN/ CHARLES J JR 110 GEORGE STREET WHEATON IL 

-]/-/ 60302 MILLER/ ANDREW T 201 N ElMWDOD AVE OAK PARK IL 

60445 TRAHEY/ THOMAS FRANCIS 14836 S KEELER AVE MIDLOTHIAN li. 



60532 ROBERTS^ BARBARA 808 SOUTH ROAD LISLE IL 

60558 CUi.BERTSON> CRAIG R 5101 HARVEY WESTERN SPRINGS IL 

60954 SCHENKj PETER MICHAEL 202 E OREGON MOmENCE IL 

61832 COPcEY/ mELANIE DENISE P BOX 1153 DANVILLE IL 

62451 STO<ES/ GARY JOE 305 N MAIN PALESTINE IL 

63105 FREDERICK/ JOHN R 55 RlDGEMOD« CLAYTON MO 

63119 DAVIDSON, SUSAN GRACE 450 W LOCKWOOD WEBSTER GROVES MQ 

63122 PAPPAS/ HARRY S 10 RIDGELINE DR WARSON WOODS MO 

63141 JESTER/ MARK A 13093 GREENBOU'jH DR CREVE COEUR MO 

65201 CONLEYi BRIAN SaNFORD 209 S GlENWOOD AVE COLUMBIA MO 

66208 GOODWIN/ FRED MERRY III 5809 BROOKBANK LN SHAWNEE MISSION KS 

6620S HOLDER/ JEAN CELESTE 6125 MISSION DR SmAWNEE MISSION KS 

66208 JACKSON/ JEFFREY JOHN 2031 BROOKWOOD RD SHAWNEE MISSION KS 

70002 FIShER/ mICHAEu S 3532 RIDQEWAY DR METAIRIE LA 

70118 WALlIS/ ROBERT BRUCE 15 NEWCOMB BLVD NEW ORLEANS LA 

7012* STUCKEY/ JAMES ALLAN 7325 CAMEO ST NEw ORLEANS LA 

70808 PHILLIPS/ THOMAS BRYAN 8*7 MAGNOLIA WOODS BATON ROUGE LA 

71105 ELLIOTT/ LYNNE SAXON 840 CA»T SHREVE DR SHREVEPORT LA 

71106 CRENSHAW/ JOHN C III 521 DUNMORELAND SHREVEPORT LA 
72209 KENNON/ CHARLES L III 23 W WINDSOR DR LITTLE ROCK AR 
72360 MANN/ BURKLEY 101 N FOREST AVENUE MARlANNA AR 
75080 LOFtIN/ CAROLE ADELE 832 TEAKWOOD PL RICHARDSON Tx 
75205 JENEVEIN/ EDWiN P III 4204 VERSAILLES DALLAS TX 
75225 CHRISTOPHER/ CHARLES V 6139 LUPTON DALLAS TX 
75225 KIN2ER/ MARK WiLLlAM 5935 LUPTON DR DALLAS TX 

75229 BALLARD/ GLENN aRuEn JR 4680 COLLEGE PARK DR OALlAS TX 

75230 CCuLlNS/ PAUL PEERS 11016 EoGEMERE RD DALLAS TX 
75230 paTtON/ GEORGIA BABETTE 6172 PRESTON HAVEN DALLAS TX 
75234 haRT/ JOHN GARY 12449 HIGH MEADOW DR DALLAS TX 
75234 PEAT/ TERRI L 4508 FOREST BEND DALLAS TX 
75240 RUSS/ KICHAEL H 6824 HUNTERS RIDGE DALLAS TX 
75243 AulG/ E ALAN 6734 FOREST GREEN DR DAlLAS TX 
75243 JOHNSON/ JULIE ELIZABET" 8723 MIDDLE DOWN DAuLAS TX 
7566E GOODWIN/ RANDAL SCOTT 116 INWOOD CIR KIlGORE TX 
77024 JOHNSTON/ PETER DAVID 146 RIVERFOREST DR HOUSTON TX 
7702" PRAPPAS/ JAMES DEMPSEY 634 HUNTERS GROVE HOUSTON TX 
77027 r.uRPHY/ KICHAELA 17 W OAK DRIVE HOUSTON TX 
7707S PALMER/ BEVERLEY DURR 14358 KELLYWOOD HOUSTON TX 
77079 RElCH/ JaYNE LOUISE 14320 MISTymEADOw HOUSTON TX 
7S14S wILLlAMS/ AMElIa jane ONE NORTH PARK RANDOLPH AFB TX 
7S209 CRAWFORD/ SAMUEL HARRIS 3202 NORTHRIDGE SAN ANTONIO TX 
78217 JONES/ CHARLES BREWER 10211 SEVERN RD SAN ANTONIO TX 
78217 JONES/ MICHAEL S 10211 SEVERN RD SAN ANTONIO TX 
78731 HESTER/ DEBRA RENEE 581 4 B-H I GHLAND PASS AUSTIN TX 
79106 NASlUND/ MICHAEL J 4604 GEM LAKE RD AMARILLO TX 
79412 RICHARDS/ JANA CHERI 2106 53RD ST LUBBOCK TX 
79701 BASkINj pat M JR 1401 BED^^ORD MIDLAND TX 
80110 FOLGER/ CAROL ANNE 5622 S FLORENCE ST ENGLEWOOD CO 
SOllO JORgENSEN/ THOMAS A jR 5848 S FULTON WAY ENGLEWOOD CO 
857:8 DAUB/ EPICH MORGAN 5550 N vlA ELENA TUCSON AZ 
89502 LEATHERS/ CURTIS HALL 2440 PIONEER DR RENO NV 
90024 DOAK, WILLIAM GEORGE 907 MALCOLM AVE LOS ANQELES CA 
90056 S-^ERBECOE/ ROBERT LEE 59l8 WOOSTER AVE LOS ANGELES CA 
90822 DEARHCND/ ANNA MARIE GTS A NAVAL SUPPORT LONG BEACH CA 

ACTIVITY 

92677 jONaS/ WAYNE B 24105 3DURAM! BAY LAGUNA NIGUEL CA 

96356 NISlOCK/ THOMAS C JR US AID INDONESIA APO SAN FRANCISCO CA 

9b404 ALLEN/ CHRISTINE MARIE AMERICAN EMBASSY APO SAN FRANCISCO CA 

992C3 STEVENSON/ SCOT' JOSEPH 4605 S HELENA SPOKANE wA 



STUDENT BODY 



165 



STUDENT BODY Cross Listed Alphabetically 



Ar: 



iBESNETHY, ir.Hi a 
S^EU, I.UI3 »LBtRfC 

oreoobv spooks 

04MS/ JAftS IBTMUP JR 
■OKINS, P09EBT rICWiEL 
L8ERT, M»Rl!r L JR 
LIO. E »L»N 

l:son, cr-u ron'Hn'. 

LLEN, CHRISTINE MiRIE 
LlENj FfilNCIS II11.00 J» 
LLEN.- nlBSABET »MN 
LSTON, ChlBLES »r»TT 
M03/ n»Hr B 
N0ER3, 3RE00 T 
.SSEHSCH/ 3RUCE *LLEN 
NOEBSON. EO-.iBO B»UL 
ELIZiBETl- 



4'iOEBSCN 
4NCEH30K 
iNSBEJS. 



NCES K 



AVEBY 



LL S 



ANDREWS* UlLLIif^ B^YAN 
ANSHEUES/ CATHV LEE 
INSPACM, PAUL OaVIO 
ARnSTBONG, "iSK B 

aesolO, David JE^cEB50^^ 

AR.'vOLO/ JOHN ANTHOMV 
ASHfCRE, JAHE5 Pt.ILIP 
aS<INS, MaPOLD F 
AuauSTINE. Duncan C J-) 
AUKER. MAT7HEK 5AVI0 
AVENT, KABGABET ASHI.EY 
SiDHAn, "■ALKEB PEHCY Hi 
SAILEY, DAVIO J 
3AILEY, JOSEP" TOOO 
Ba:bO# ELIZABETH ANNE 
BAKER. SUZANNE CARTER 
BAnEB. "IllIah C 
BAL0«IN, JA,1E9 E 
BALLARC. ALENN ARLEM JB 
BANE, SOSan LYNN 
BANGQ, ElMANUEL 

in 



BaBKER, SwER 



Y LONO 
LEE !I 



BABNARD/ DAVIO HALLEr? 

BARNES. Carolyn teresa 

BARNES. QaRY ALAN 

BARNES. Stephen 8 

BARNES. tllLLIAH JR 
BaBnETT, ANOELA kaye 
BABnETT, hIlLIAM T JR 
BARnhIll. ORaOY K 
8ARR. timothy S 

Barrett. jOhn TBETfcRO 

BARRETT, SICNEY RAY jB 
SARklNEAU, CHARLES f1 
8ARSY, ERNEST H JR 
BABTELT, PERRY LESTER 



BaSkIv 



Pat h JR 



ARGUERITE 



EOwaRO 
SETS" 



ylO CS 



YEN 



BCBE 



SA33, 0E8= 
BASS, JAHES A in 
BASTIN, ScOTT WAt-fJE 
BATEMAN, rBETRICK L Jf 

BAYNABO, svSan wal::ER 

BEACH, 

BEARD. 

tEAflO, 

BEARO, 

BLAHriALL. JOHN FORD 

BELL. iENnETH oRAOLEY 

BELl. RORERT s 

bencin:, pranklin t 
benedict. victoria n 

BEnPIELO. BONalD W 
BENNETT, ROBERT JR 
SewNlNOHOrF. BRIAN 3 
1ENTGN, JOHN 
SERBERICK, ►'AYNiOND E jR 
BESRT, BRIAN HCkARO 
BESSELuIEu, Thohas lEE 
BHATTAL, JA3JIT S 
BILLINGS. WUlIAH S 
BINflAliN. LAURIE E 

BISHOP. Robert h 

BL4L0CK, CLARENCE A 

ALOCK. alLLlA" ALLEN 



9lU 



'IChaRD J JB 



BLUE. PHILIP 
BOBERTZ. CHARLES ARNOLD 
SOCK. MA.-irRED HELMUT 
BODE. THOhaS c 
BOaOESS. JOHN -OBaCK 
aOOQUS. Dan aroin 
BOLDfilOOE, OavIO h 
Bd-LINOER, BRUCE EOXABO 
BOr-OURAMT, CHARLES B 



BONOURA 



STUART r 



jLLn 



27203 
30339 
300S3 
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21730 
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33905 
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BONSACK, TI'DThY ALAN 
BOONE. JAheS wkITSITT 
BORTELL, BEVERLY H 

303LET, Christopher p 

BOSilELL. STEkaPT 1 

80««ER. Timothy Patrick 
BOJMAN, Catherine l 

BOi-ShER. JAHE? EOhIN 
BOYCE. BICHARO N 
aOYO. CORINNE HUNTEB 
BOYD. STEvEN B 
SO'O. wILlIam e jR 
BOYLE. BBfnCA nABlE 
BOTUSTON. DO^:YA ANN 
3BABANT, OABLFNE ANN 
BBAOi-EY, PAUL BOYD 
BBFNNAN, AMNE GRANMILLE 
8He:<T, habQaBET S 
BREhSTER. LEE C'ROL 
BRICE. JOHN- I.HITE 
SSIDOES, CHARLES PAYNE 
BRIOOES, KATHRTN T 

OeOROE THOMAS 



BRIKM 



ilS, JOH 



LEON 
ALTER E 



BROCK. JAMES vaU 
BHOCKHAN. RCetRT 

bronq. ocrcthy carol 

BROOKS, "aRK ALAN 
BROOME, NINA EBICHSEN 
BROWN, AMY LUCINDA 

BR'jCE peRRim 
bruce tankard 



£3 



BROW 



sacw 

BROW 



CAROL 
CIanE 
ELIZA 



SIMS 



■'H BOONE 

BROWN, FPiNK MARSHALL 

BROWN. OEOB'IE w IV 

BROWN. JEFFREY A 

BROWN. NANCY RICHARDSON 

BROWN. BOgER h jR 

BROwN. RUTH C 

BROWN, STiNTON C 

BRUCE. kEnneT kILLIaM 

BRYAN, EMILIE WATKINS 

BRYAN, JAMES A II: 

BRYAN, jJOKiNq MATHEmS 

BRYAN. STiN''ON T 
BRYANT. ThCMAS TAYLOR jR 

buchanan. keith 
buckley. jeffrey oean 
bumgascnEh, -argaret a 
3um3abner, oebra jo 

BUMGaRnER. LAURIE S 
aURlANEK. OTTQ B JR 
BURKE. ANN WYAT' 
BURKHOIOER. WILLIAM C 
BURNS. jOhn B 

duRSON. Charles a 

BUSCH. JOHN MICHAEL 
BUTLER. TcBI ANNE 
BYRD. MELINDa ANN 
CAIN, EDINA ELISE 
CAInE. THOMAS PHILI 



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CHILDRESS, KRISTA 



CAL"wELu. 

CALHOUN, 

CallCDTT. 

CAMERON, 

CAMtRRA, 

CAMPBELL. 

CAMPBELL. 

CANOLER. 

CAN^'ON. B 

CANNON, 3 

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Carlisle. 

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CARLTON. ROBERT WlN< 
CARPEBOS. WILLIAM If 
CARP, KENT EMERSON 
CAPR. WILLIAM C 
CASTER. Mijoa ERKIN 
CARTER. ROBERT JR 
CASPER. Susan BARNES 
CARTEEL. SALLY NELL 
CASTELFIN, alLaRD 
CASTELLI, JEFFREY W 

cate9, laura lynn 
cathey. Robert a 
catron, n.ncy ellen 
CauOlE. Mary annE 
caulkiss. 

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CHRISTIE. NORTON BRADLEY 32207 



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FOLGtB, LtOU l 25712 

FOLOER, JOHN PUSSELL III 28712 

FOJNTaIN, M4»TH» TOY 31707 

FOUSHEE, BOBEFT mQlT 2B209 

FOX, MICHjEl CEOflIC 283t,5 

FOr» J«f(ES SOLlIE 35010 

FBiNKLIN/ Bi>^^T^ 32058 

FSEOESICK. JOHN B 63105 

FBETWELL, SU3*N 29?0c 

FBIEB30S, HE^BY F JB 29115 

FBIESINOEa, CHBI3 III 37315 

FRISI.JJ, CHiPtES STEVEN 32217 

FHiTTS, STEPHEN BiTrONO 30338 

FROEhlICH, mSBvEY a JR 1?803 

F'JLENWIOER; OGBOTHY C 28*01 

OiDOY. CHiRLES TH01AS JR ?1306 

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HCB30N, JOHN B .R 27330 

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JENKINS. CHARLES R III 28358 

JENKINS, JOHN MARSHALL 29358 

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JENSEN, SCOTT MCKENZIE 272*0 

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JOHNSON, ELIZABETH BELO 2833* 

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JOnES, EOuaRO lee III 23229 

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JONES, jChn Raymond 30327 

JONES, LInOa l 28150 

jOnES. MICHAEL 3 78217 

JONES, SIBIL 28372 

JONES. WILLIAM HUGH 279S6 

jCRDAN, STALE' E 27292 

JORDAN, Stuart h 283o! 

JORDAN, "ELOON M JR 28305 

JOROENSEN, THOMAS A JR 80110 

JOYCE, WALTER CLYDE JR 27104 

JUSTUS. STEVEN OEORGE 28739 

KAOISON. PAULA 32303 

KAFOOLIS, MARY K 32*05 

KAUHUS. JAMES A 088*5 

KAYTON, aiLSERT STUaRT 234*9 

KEELS. PENELOPE JOAN 27io* 

KEENER, MjBT LYNNE 37922 

KEENER, Stephen R 28773 

KELISCHEK, 3A8INE 4RWEN 28902 

KELLER, David W III 29138 

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KELLO, MARGARET 2803* 

KELlS, R0S3 ALAN 32670 

KELLY, OAvIO LCUI3 23.01 

KEllY, RICHAOO SIQNON 2»30l 

KELLY, WILLIAM B 28*13 

KELL», wIlL!AM MUSkE 28305 

kemp, bruce forbes jb 23229 

kennedy, michael david 18015 

kennon. Charles l hi 72209 

kepchar, james k 2.5.1 

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kiloore, sidney wal^is 3351* 

KIMMEL/ Stephen Q 280J6 

KING. DAVID L 21228 

KING, OEORGE T 07..4 

KINO, POBfKT PHILLIP Atail 

KINZER. MiPK WILLIAM 75225 

KIRK, KENNETH ANDREW 28.01 

KISKENOOL, ROBERT WARD 23211 

KIS3AM, Barbara IvEY 32607 

<l:nG, ROBERT wILLlAM l»4l7 

KNIGHT, David l 2803* 

KNOwlES, OECROE M 11530 

KOONCE, Philip h hi 285oi 

kOPEl, JAhES JOSEPH JR 33355 

KRAVET, John myRON 335*3 

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KRESHON, MARTIN JOHN JR 28207 

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langfgro, henrietta 29801 

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lapplE. Robert c 1059. 

lasley. Robert i.ocke 372i» 

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LINDNER, WIILIAM L JB 28210 

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Hm3, OUN,lD MICM'.EL 3360* 

LIIAKER, OAVIO GLENN 26210 

LITTLE, AuDREf BROOKS 28*90 

LIVACITIS, JAMES S 30,127 

LIVELY, Marvin E 23235 

LOEB. CHRISTOPHER W 30301 

LOEBLEIN, CHRtSTOPMEB T 281.. 

LOfTiN, Carole adele 75080 

LOGAN, JOSEPH p 19808 

LOMAX, hEnHY C JR 28210 

LOnOBEy. qrEGO LESLIE 23233 

LONG, Carol Kathleen 27215 

long, GWYnN D 27033 

LONG, NANCY ERWiN 283.5 

LCNO, WILLIAM FIFE JR 283.5 

LORTZ, LAURA ANNE 29609 

lOve, DAVID Calvin 2S025 

LOVETT, JOHN w .2301 

LOVIN, CRAia J 29*93 

LOWOER, Ann LOUISE 282i5 

LUMMus. Stanford james 327*0 

LUPJ, OONjLD w 29*.* 

LYLE, OUEnTIn e III 085.0 

LYLES, JOHN 3 jR 3360* 

LYON, FRANKLIN SCPTT 231,15 

LYTlE, JAMES ALBERT III 339.0 

MCABN, JEFFREY HUGH 28352 

MCARTHUR, JOHN R 29730 

MCAVOY, SUSAN 19.60 

MCCALL, Roy king 3oc30 

MCCARTHY. ROBERT RICHARD 19135 

MCCLINTOCk, OSCAR MILLER 29*. 6 

MCCLURE. PaMELL* ANNE 33712 

maCCCNNaChIE. nancy 29*21 

MCCONNELL, KEVIN R 2090* 

MCCORO. CaVIO SIKE3 31750 

MCCORO, KiTHY 23078 

MCCOY, HAPRELL w JR 27030 

MCCRACKEN, NANCY 8 277o5 

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MACCADE, WILLIAM H III 19»60 

MCDONALD. ANCREW TERRELL 3023* 

maCDONaLD, mylES ANDREW 37.11 

MCJOWE_L, THEODORE NOTES 3031.' 

MCELWEE, ANDREW A JR 07006 

MCEwEn, BoeERT J IV 23211 

MCGRaOY, MICHAEL JAMES 28717 

MCGRATH, OOBn C III 22091 

nCHLGH, NoELLE SUZANNE 2083. 

MCKINLEY, WILLIAM 2 15825 

MCLAWHOSN, FRECEPICK D 28590 

MACLEAN, JONATHAN LEE 32780 

MCLEAN, WILLIAM H 23352 

mClENDON, KATHBINE a 2/51. 

MCLENDON. SUSAN K 275l» 

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MCMILLAN, VICTOR M 323bl 

MCMUBRaY, PaTBICIa LYNN 00927 

MCMUPBY, HARRIS LIOON 28150 

MCMURBY, WILLIAM 30577 

MCNAIR, NANCY LYNN 303.5 

MCNEELY, CYRUS C lit 27215 

MCNEELY, RICHARD DANIEL 30C3. 

MCNEILL, NORA P 31730 

MCPHAlL, CARL lEE 38207 

MCOUADE, ROBERT OWYER 070l* 

M4A0, CYMTHlA lEE 3B205 

MACCONOMY, SCOTT DOUGLAS 22302 

MAC3ILL, MARTHA NELL 2231. 

MADDEN, John DaLE 085.0 

MAMONEY. THOMAS CHARLES 300S» 

MAINES, PONAlO D .84.0 

MANER, GORDON c J0319 

MANGELSOCrF, CHRISTOPHER 15139 

MANN, BURkLEY 72340 

MANNING, CAROLINA 23C36 

MANNING, KENNETH SCOTT 2710. 

MANSFIELD, WILLIAM 330*5 

MARSH, ELINCRE DOROTHY .0305 

MARSHALL, HARRISON L JR 29409 

MARSHALL. PEYTON J III 21238 

MARTIN, ANTHONY RAY 28081 

MARTIN. SaVIO RIAN JB 3C30J 

V. JOHN Edward martin ..3i3 

M.RTIN. LENNA KAREN 27312 

MARTIN, R.1BERT RUSSELL 22101 

MARTIN, SaNTFORD FRANK 30339 

MARIOF, CMARLFS a 2'60. 

MASON. EMILY HARVEY 10803 

MATHENY, nancy I 23059 

MAUS. WALTER KYLE 37330 

M'.YER. RCbEBT m 330*2 

MAYNARO, WANDA SAIL 27*12 

MAYS, ELISABETH T 39205 

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RAHLlNOS, DAVID JEPFREY 
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WAOE, JULIUS J III 28507 

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•lALKER, JAMES ANDREW 32931 

>lALi<ER, LEA RAvENEw 28365 

WALLj JAHjs GHIER 27028 

WALL, NEOroN haOISON 27^62 

WALL» SCOTT I.HELAN0 37919 

"ALi-ACE, TERPAZZO 32803 

WALLET, PaOE 9I.AKESLEE 383*6 

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WARE, OLIVIA CaCEOIa 301.3 

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WATKINS, CAROL ELIZABETH 24503 

»ATSON, KaTHERVN CECILIA »207l 

WATSON, PETER OAVIO 07028 

WATT, CARoLVN LOUISE 32303 

W<TT, JAMIE ELLEN 32303 

wE8a, JOSEPH RICHARO 3208* 

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wEIR, KAREN RaE 28211 

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"hITE, OfwE" anOERSON 35223 

WHITE, ELI2A8E-H A 2783* 

«HlTC, KAREN VICTORIA 2*3*1. 

WHITE, KEv:n MICHAEL 07S32 

WHITE, lOcKE 28034 

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xICKERj ElIZaBE*H ANN 28115 

WIER, ANSELA 3921S 

WIER, OREOORt WILLIAM 10708 

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13901 WOLP, kaTmERINE P'.INN 28036 

2783* wOMACK, SaPah peck 30083 

28207 WONO, Ftl 

23139 wOCC, JAME3 rREORICK III 38211 

303*2 WJODALL, HUNTER EAfL 37918 

2733* WOODARO, STEVE WAOE ."'350S 

781*8 WC003, ANNE aOAMS 02r25 

32**» WOODWARD, FRANK NCRRIS 323SI 

322:0 nOOOwARO, KATHERINE L 3i33l 

37920 WORTHY, FbanCES KAY 29730 

23325 wRICIhT, anIEuA HOPE 30338 

19337 mRIOmT, JaPBaRa rlARIE 30338 

28210 WRIOHT, JO.^N P 31201 

23227 URUCH, EPiC aOROON 28036 

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27*07 YANOLE, David STEWART 29*0' 

336*9 yEaRWOOO, JAMES 30620 

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30161 YOUNO, MATTHEW OLEHN •*131 

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23139 YOUNO, THOMAS MEASES 27833 

30701 ,(]„, „4RK w 27409 

28712 YOwCLL, JOHN PHILIP 22712 

36606 IAM30S, JOHN MITCHELL 25801 




169 



STUDENT BODY 



JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

France — Montpellier 

Anderson, Elizabeth Walker, 1019 Woodland Drive, Rock Hill, S. C. 29730 

Bencini, Frank Tulloch, 801 Country Club Drive, High Point, N. C. 27262 

Benedict, Victoria Neil, 1 0840 Springknoll Drive, Potomac, Maryland 20854 

Bondurant, Charles Bernard, 1 3995 S. W. 72nd Court, Miami, Florida 33158 

Clifford, Peter Gurdon, Blue Mill Road, Morristown, New Jersey 07960 

Etheridge, Margaret Anne, 471 5 Harris Trail, Atlanta, Georgia 30327 

Gilchrist, Henry Victor, 207 Virginia Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 23226 

Harvey, Micheie Anne, 4258 Executive Drive, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30083 

Johnson, Stephen Hall, 2720 Kenmore Road, Richmond, Virginia 23225 

Kepchar, James Kimberly, 304 Linden Drive, Danville, Virginia 24541 

Law, Charles Elliott, 71 6 Rollingwood Road, Aiken, S. C. 29801 

Lovin, Craig J iles, 1 02 Peden Street, Westminster, S. C. 29693 

McMurray, Patricia Lynn, Esmeralda No. 9, Urb. Bucare, Pio Piedras, Puerto Rico 00927 

Moses, Laura Elizabeth, Box 1 344, Sumter, S. C. 29150 

Murphy, Andrea Rosemary, 1 2 Madison Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

Thompson, Mark Allan, 792 Ridge Road, Lansing, New York 14882 

Germany — Marburg 

Abernethy, Anne Bolick, 609 2nd Avenue, N. W., Conover, N. C. 2861 3 
Fiden, Charles John, Jr., 1 1 George Street, Wheaton, Illinois 601 87 
Folger, Carol Anne, 5622 South Florence, Englewood, Colorado 801 1 
Jenkins, Char'es Rees, III, 304 West 31st Street, Lumberton, N. C. 28358 
Linder, Virginia Carolyn, 301 4 Buckingham Road, Durham, N. C. 27707 
Marsh, Elinore Dorothy, 2205 Speed Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky 40205 
Miller, Page Allison, 2628 Wade Avenue, Raleigh, N. C. 27607 
Mowry, William Little, 9203 Millard Creek Road, Charlotte, N. C. 2821 3 
Nash, David Lee, Route 1 , Box 67A, Whittier, N. C. 28789 
Richter, Don Carl, 2306 Springdale Road, Decatur, Alabama 35601 

England — East Anglia 

Frank Douglas Rambo, II, 1820 Summit Road, Henderson, N. C. 27536 

England - Reading 
Anne James Ficklen, 3513 34th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20008 

England — On Leave, Manchester University 

Paul Peers Collins, 11 01 6 Edgemere Road, Dallas, Texas 75230 

Denmark — Copenhagen — On Leave with SUNY at Brockport 
Laura Rankin, 51 8 South York Street, Gastonia, N. C. 28052 

Spain — On Leave with UNC-Chapel Hill 

Clayton Frances Houchens, Box 2318, Davidson, N. C. 28036 

Wales — On Leave with Beaver College 
1 70 Clayton Taylor Rogers, III, 1732 Princeton Drive, State College, Pennsylvania 1 6801 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Davidson's Alumni Association is strong, active, and dynamic. Davidson alumni 
express their loyalty to the college in a variety of ways. The regional chapters are ready 
to be of service to prospective students, local schools and churches, or others who 
desire more information about the college. Officers and chapter presidents: 

OFFICERS 



Robert T. Amos '47, President 
Dr. J. D. Ashmore '49, President-Elect 
Dr. John L. McLucas '41, Vice-President 
Robert E. Cline '48, Vice-President 



High Point, North Carolina 

Greenville, South Carolina 

Washington, D. C. 

Hickory, North Carolina 



ALUMNI CHAPTER PRESIDENTS 



ASHEVILLE 

Dr. Haywood (Woody) N. Hil 

145 Midland Drive 28804 



'66 



ATLANTA 

George G. Trask '62 

Huie, Ware, Sterne, Brown & Ide 

1200 Standard Federal Savings Building 30303 

AUGUSTA 

Frank A. Stafford '63 

1131 Highland Avenue 30904 

BELMONT 

Charles T. Stowe '58 

P.O. Box 1157 28012 

BIRMINGHAM 

Roy W.Gilbert, Jr. '59 

112 North 20th Street 35203 

BOSTON 

Dr. Frederick C. Lane '60 
National Academy of Science 
2101 Constitution Avenue 
Washington, D. C. 20418 

CAPE FEAR 

Dr. Thomas M. McCutchen '59 
3217 Brechin Road 
Fayetteville, N. C. 28303 

CATAWBA COUNTY 
Edward (Ted) Hyde Pulliam '65 
216 1st Avenue North No. 12 
Conover, N. C. 28613 

CATAWBA VALLEY 
Randolph (Randy) L. Austin '62 
Drexel Enterprises 
Drexel, N. C. 28619 



CENTRAL KENTUCKY 
Dr. E. Randolph Daniel '58 
3484 Greentree Road 
Lexington, Ky. 40502 

CHARLESTON 

Dr. John A. Fagg '67 

332 Bennett Street 

Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 29464 

CHARLOTTE 

Julius). Wade, Jr. '50 

600 Johnston Building 28202 

CHARLOTTESVILLE 

Dr. Fred S. Morton '43 
Pine Top Road 22903 

CHATTANOOGA 

R. Allan Edgar '62 

105 Glenview 

Lookout Mountain, Tn. 37350 



CHICAGO 
George L. Milne '40 
21 8 Dehor Avenue 
St. Charles, 111.60174 

COLUMBIA 

Robert G. Waites '65 

418 Edisto Avenue 29206 

CONCORD 

Martin B. Foil, Jr. '55 

556 Hermitage Drive, S.E. 28025 

DALLAS 

Steve H. Sands '68 

3601 Beverly Drive 75205 



171 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



172 



DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL 

Dr. Edward (Ned) Hedgpeth, )r. '58 

1110 West Main Street 

Durham, N. C. 27701 

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 

lulian M. Pleasants '60 
2632 S.W. 14th Drive 32608 

GASTONIA 

Dr. Robert A. Blake '61 

1119 Queensgate Street 28052 

GREENSBORO 

Harold N. Bynum '61 

2511 Lafayette Avenue 27408 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

Howard (Champ) W. Covington, jr. '66 

142 Buckingham Road 29607 

HIGH POINT 

Dr. Charles E. Rowe, Jr. '61 

1238 Sturbridge Rd. 27260 

HOUSTON 

Ed T. Watkins '40 

5968 Riverview Way 77027 

JACKSONVILLE 

A. Hamilton Cooke '63 

5548 Capri Road 32210 

KANSAS CITY 

Dr. William C. Link '37 

Box 222 

Liberty, Mo. 64068 

KINSTON-GOLDSBORO-NEW BERN 
Thomas H. Hamilton, Jr. '63 
2400 Woodview Road 
Kinston, N. C. 28501 

KNOXVILLE 

Irving M. Ellis, Jr. (Tyke) '52 
2108 Indian Hills Drive 37919 

LEXINGTON (DAVIDSON COUNTY) 
William (Skip) P. Greathouse, Jr. '73 
Route 10, Box 505 
Lexington, N. C. 27292 

LITTLE ROCK 
David M. Powell '66 
2815 North Pierce 72207 

LOUISVILLE 

Dr. William T. Simpson, Jr. '48 

7 Totem Road 40207 

MEMPHIS 

Dr. Charles F. Safley, Jr. '63 

5900 Poplar 381 38 



NASHVILLE 

Rev. Perry H. Biddle, Jr. '54 

807 Jones Street 

Old Hickory, Tn. 37138 

NEW ORLEANS 
Walter F. Bost, Jr. '62 
3527 Metairie Ct. 
Metairie, La. 70002 

NEW YORK CITY 
Rev. W. Robert Martin, Jr. '57 
Research Park, Building J 
1101 State Road 
Princeton, N. J. 08540 

N.C. - S. C. BORDER 
J. Robert Gordon '61 
Speros Cox Building 
Laurinburg, N. C. 28352 

NORTH WILKESBORO 

Gov. James E. Holshouser, Jr. '56 

Box 328 

Boone, N. C. 28607 

ORLANDO 
Robert S. Green '61 
1 760 Legion Drive 
Winter Park, Fla. 32789 

PEE DEE 

Dr. Arthur D. McCutchan '56 
P. O. Box 895 
Florence, S. C. 29501 

MYRTLE BEACH 
Dan M. Campbell '66 
Route 5, Box 107A 
Conway, S. C. 29526 

PENSACOLA-MOBILE 
Dr. W. Arnie Covell '51 
1941 Seville Drive 
Pensacola, Fla. 32503 

PHILADELPHIA 

Eric M. Nichols '66 
490 Prussian Lane 
Strafford-Wayne, Penn. 19087 

RALEIGH 

Thomas L. Covington, Jr. '61 

2901 Sandia Drive 27607 

RICHMOND 

Dr. Charles M. James '59 

6306 Ridgeway Road 23226 

ROANOKE 

Ronald M. Ayers '65 

261 4 Crystal Spring Avenue, S.W. 24014 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



ROCK HILL 

Carroll M. Pitts, Jr. '60 

1804 Ebenezer Road 29730 

ROCKY MOUNT/GREENVILLE/WILSON 
William C. Glidewell, Jr. '54 
First State Bank 
Greenville, N. C. 27834 

SALISBURY 

Richard F.Thurston '67 

Box 1475 28144 

SAN ANTONIO 

W. Lewis Hart '30 

National Bank of Commerce Building 

78205 

SOUTH FLORIDA 
Michael W.Owen '63 
5600 S. W. 86th Street 
Miami, Fla. 33143 

SOUTHWEST FLORIDA 
Harry S. Ciine '62 
P.O. Box 1878 
Clearwater, Fla. 33517 

SPARTANBURG 
Elford H. Morgan '58 
168 Edgecomb 29302 

STATESVILLE 
William A. Mills '64 
Route 11, Box 289 28677 

ST. LOUIS 

S.William Aitken '66 

6800 Washington Avenue 

Trinity Presbyterian Church 631 30 



TALLAHASSEE 

Dr. David E. Craig '61 

905 Kenilworth Road 32303 

TIDEWATER 
C. Clark Laster, III '67 
1020 F & M Bank Building 
Norfolk, Va. 23510 

TRI-CITIES 

Dr. Edward T. West, Jr. '51 
1 1 3 East Watauga Avenue 
Johnson City,Tn. 37601 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Dr. |ohn L. McLucas '41 
6519 Dearborn Drive 
FallsChurch.Va. 22044 

WEST PALM BEACH 
Steve G. Davidson '65 
218 Sea Spray 
Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 

WEST-SAN FRANCISCO, 

LOS ANGELES 
Dr. Harry B. Richardson, Jr. '62 
700 McDonald Avenue 
Santa Rosa, Cal. 95404 

WILMINGTON 

Dr. Thomas Craven, Jr. '51 

315 North 17th Street 28401 

WINSTON-SALEM 

J. McGregor (Mac) Smyth '63 

745 Sylvan Road 27104 




INDEX 



174 



Academic Calendar, inside front cover 
Accelerated Programs, 1 1 
Accreditation, 2 
Administrative Staff, 123 
Admission, Requirements for, 41 

Advanced Placement, 43 

Application, 42 

Early Decision, 40, 42 

Interviews, 43 

Transfer, 43 
Alumni Association, 1 71 
Applied Music, 48, 91 
Area Requirements, 24 
Art, 31,51 

Art History, 20, 51 

Studio, 52 
Athletic Scholarships and Awards, 1 35 
Athletics, 25, 32 
Awards, 1 33 

Biology, 53 

Business Management, 14 

Calendar/Academic, inside front cover 

Campus Living, 28 

Center for Special Studies, 9, 23 

Charlotte Area Educational Consortium, 18 

Chemistry, 57 

Class of 1976, list of graduates, 1 40 

Classics, 60 

Study Abroad, 21 
Clubs, 33 

Code of Responsibility, 27 
College Board Tests, 41 
College Union, 29 
Communications, 33 
Computer, 1 7 

Correspondence Directory, inside front cover 
Counseling, 1 8, 32 
Courses of Instruction, 50 

Art, 51 

Biology, 53 

Chemistry, 57 

Classics, 60 

Drama and Speech, 63 

Economics, 65 

Education, 68 

English, 69 

French, 74 

German, 77 

Greek, 60 

History, 79 

Humanities, 84 

Latin, 61 

Mathematics, 85 

Military Science, 88 

Music, 89 

Philosophy, 92 



Physical Education, 95 
Physics, 95 
Political Science, 98 
Premedical, 100 
Psychology, 1 01 
Religion, 1 04 
Sociology, 108 
South Asian Studies, 1 1 1 
Spanish, 1 1 2 

Davidson, History of, 36 
Davidson, in England, 21 

in France, 19 

in Germany, 20 

in Lands of Classical Antiquity, 21 

in Spain and Latin America, 21 
Debate, 31, 63 
Deferred Payments, 49 
Dentistry, 12 
Departmental Honors, 10 

Early Decision, Admission, 42 
Economics, 65 
Education, 1 3, 68 
Employment, 46 
England, study in, 21 
English, 69 
Engineering, 1 4 
Enrollment by Classes, 1 44 
Expenses, 47 
Extended Studies, 1 1 ^ 
Experiential Programs and Life/Work 
Planning, 1 8 

Faculty, 117 

Emeriti, 122 
Fees, 47 
Finance, 47 
Financial Aid, 44 
Food Service, 30 

Foreign Language Requirements, 23 
Foreign Study, 8, 19 
Forensics, 31 , 63 
Fraternities, 29 
France, study in, 1 9 
French, 74 

Geographic Distribution of Students, 144 
German, 77 
Germany, study in, 20 
Greek, 60 
Grey College Union, 29 

History, 79 

History of the college, 36 

Honoraries, 1 36 

Honorary Degrees, 1976-77, 143 

Honor System, 27 

Honors, Departmental, 1 

Humanities, 84 



Independent study, 7 
Infirmary, 48 
Interdisciplinary study, 8 
Interviews and campus visits, 43 
Involuntary Withdrawal, 28 

Junior Year Abroad, 170 

Language Requirement, 23 

Latin, 61 

Latin America, study in, 21 

Laundry, 48 

Law, preparation, 1 3 

Library, 1 6, 37 

Loans, 46 



Study Abroad, 8, 19 
Summer Study, 1 2 

Teacher Education, 1 3, 68 
Transfer Credit, 43 
Trustees, 128 
Tuition, 47 

Visits, 43 

Washington Semester, 22 
Wind Ensemble, 13, 31 
Women's Chorus, 1 3, 31 



YW-YMCA, 33 



Madrigal Singers, 1 3, 31 

Major Requirements, 23 

Map, 176 

Mathematics, 85 

Mealtime, 30 

Military Science, 88 

Ministry and Religious Education, 1 3, 32, 1 04 

Music, 13, 31,47,89 

Payment Schedule, 47 
Philosophy, 92 
Physical Education, 95 
Physics, 95 
Political Science, 98 
Premedical, 12,100 
Pre-ministerial, 1 3 
Pre-law, 1 3 

Presidents of Davidson, 39 
Psychology, 1 01 
Publications, 33 
Purpose, Statement of, 38 

Refunds, 47 
Religion, 1 04 
Religious Activities, 32 
Requirements for Graduation, 23 
Residence Halls, 28 
ROTC, 14, 46, 88 

Scholarship Holders, 1976-77, 137 

Scholarships, 44, l'"9 

Social Life, 29 

Sociology, 1 08 

Self-Instructional Language Program, 17 

South Asian Studies, 1 1 1 

Spain, study in, 21 

Spanish, 112 

Speech, 63 

Special Interest Groups, 33 

Statement of Purpose, 38 

Student Body, 1976-77, by i\p code, 145; 

by alphabet, 166 
Student Government, 27 



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CAPSULE INFORMATION 

A private, liberal arts, undergraduate college. 

Coeducational since 1972. Founded as a men's college in 1837. 
Enrollment for 1 976-77 was 1 ,300 (see pages 1 44, 1 45 and 
166). 

A strong, teaching faculty of 96 persons. Eighty-eight percent of 
them hold earned doctorates. 

Offers the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees (see 
page 23). An unusually high percentage (about 80%) of those 
who enter as freshmen obtain a degree from Davidson; and 
approximately 70% of Davidson's graduates go on to grad- 
uate or professional schools. 

A residential college with a strong sense of community; a church- 
related college with opportunities for spiritual growth; an 
informal college which encourages student-faculty contact. 

An honor system governs campus life and sets a tone of trust, 
responsibility, commitment, and personal freedom. 

The school year is divided into three ten-week terms (see calendar, 
inside front cover). Normal course load: three courses per 
term. 

The comprehensive fee for 1977-78 is $4,665.00. This includes 
tuition, room rent, meals (two plans available), routine med- 
ical care, laundry (sheets are furnished), and activity fee (see 
page 47).